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Discussion Starter #1
The other day I decided to shoot my 10/22 and my Henry .22 lever gun side by side to do a little casual comparing and contrasting. Now, it's true they are different guns, one being an auto loader and the other a tube fed lever gun. But it's not really apples to oranges. More like mac's vs. granny smiths, I guess.

They are both carbines with 18.5 in barrels. They are the same length and weigh the same. The Henry costs a bit more, but it does have a walnut stock. The Ruger deluxe sporter probably costs close to the same as the Henry.

Shooting them? I don't shoot groups from a bench, and I don't have scopes, so I just plink at cans, bricks, shoot n see targets, etc. I mostly stand and shoot, but sometimes I'll sit, or even use a tree stump to rest on.

The biggest difference I noticed when shooting them side by side is recoil. Now, I don't know that any .22 rifle really has any appreciable recoil; however, when I shoot the Henry, where the bolt stays closed until the lever is manually cycled, there is no noticeable recoil at all. With the Ruger, the rifle does move a little against my shoulder. It also twists a little along the axis of the barrel.

The second biggest difference is the triggers. Both have stock triggers, and the Henry's trigger is way better than the 10/22's. It seems as though the 10/22's has gotten better with use, but the Henry has a really crisp break and not much travel.

My 10/22 is completely stock. My Henry has a HiViz front sight added. As such, the sights on both are about equally easy to use.

I have no idea if either of these rifles is inherently more accurate than the other. In practice, I find they are pretty close to equal. With careful aim, a good cheek weld, and no flinching, I can shoot pretty much the same with both. I would say that, due to the trigger, and no recoil, the Henry is easier to be accurate with, but it's not a huge difference.

The Henry holds 15 +1 .22LR rounds. The Ruger of course has either a 10 round or 25 round mag. The Ruger, being an auto-loader, obviously can shoot faster than a lever gun.

For some reason, I have found, though, that I enjoy shooting the Henry a bit more. Can't really say why.

A couple of other things- with the lever gun I don't go through ammo as fast as with the 10/22. Also, it's really easy to keep clean. It does not get nearly as dirty as with a blow back action.
 

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Good comparative review.
Have a H001T on my wish list.
 

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I concur with everything you said except about the Henry being able to be cleaned easier. The Henry is easy, but I prefer the 10/22 as I can get down into the trigger (if need be) and also, it only has 1 bolt to take out, as compared to the 5 on the Henry, all of those show. Great review on two great guns that I would feel my gun collection would be lacking if I sold either one of them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Shot some more today. I'm convinced both rifles are pretty much equally accurate. The Henry is definitely easier for me to shoot, though.

I didn't say anything about ammo in my original post. It's really not an issue in either rifle. They both will shoot anything. Of course the Henry will also shoot 22 shorts as well as 22lr.
 

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Target photos??
 

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Thanks for the write-up. I enjoyed reading of your casual approach to target shooting. We do things about the same way. Using a 4 inch and 2 inch spinner target (ring the gong) we count how many hits out of ten in a mag, instead of measuring groups (most of the time). I like using the Shoot-N-See targets too.
 

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Thank you ditto......
How pleasant to read a casual yet informative
range report.
Seriously !
No imported micro-brew beer...
just down-home selections that normal folks
can find in the local coolers......
and afford.
Kudos, Brother.
 

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Great comparison and you hit on why I bought the Henry and like it a lot.

I have a 1976 vintage Winchester 190 22 cal semi-auto. In many ways it is similar to a 10/22, so I haven't felt the need to buy the Ruger.
The 190 is very accurate with the inexpensive scope that came with it, but I enjoy shooting the Henry more.
 

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I hope to own both this year

in fact today I was holding a Henry Frontier at the LGS, the octagon barrel version with the brass receiver, used a little, saw a few spots of rust on the barrel and magazine tube, few scratches on the walnut and brass, asking price was $345. It was made in Brooklyn, NY not NJ so I guess that means it is an older version? He also had a brand new one at $429? I think. So is $345 a decent price? This LGS, you will never steal one from him and sometimes he is pretty fair on price, you will pay what the market will bear in his shop.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
in fact today I was holding a Henry Frontier at the LGS, the octagon barrel version with the brass receiver, used a little, saw a few spots of rust on the barrel and magazine tube, few scratches on the walnut and brass, asking price was $345. It was made in Brooklyn, NY not NJ so I guess that means it is an older version? He also had a brand new one at $429? I think. So is $345 a decent price? This LGS, you will never steal one from him and sometimes he is pretty fair on price, you will pay what the market will bear in his shop.
That's sounds pretty good. The blued barrel Frontier is usually around $350 new, so to get a brass one for that price is probably not bad at all.
 

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Henry started manufacturing in Brooklyn, NY in 1996 and moved to Bayonne, NJ in September 2002, so that rifle is at least 10 years old.
 

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The action

felt very smooth and I'm honestly looking for a gun with a few character markings on it so I won't be babying it too much. This one had a cut out sock on the brass to try and protect it.

Initially I went to the shop looking for specifically a 10/22 or a Henry Frontier Octagon barrel(anyone know if that is a 20" barrel?) or a Marlin 39A, wanting to get a feel for what is out there and what the fair market price would be. He has some old 39A's but not out for sale yet. One thing that I am considering: the big loop lever. Marlin(Brownells) wants $148 for one. $48 for one from Henry. By the way, what is the purpose of the big loop lever? I'll research prices via auction at some point this week, may put that Henry on lay away.
 

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Nice write-up. The .22s are fun, cheap to shoot and accurate as many would like. I have a stock 10/22 and a Henry H003 pump. My experience is that I tend to shoot the Henry a bit better when plinking. I have rationalized that as you have pointed out, I tend to shoot the 10/22 more quickly with multiple shot and the pump is shot "one shot at a time" as I concentrate more. I shoot paper, but I bought the orange metal swinging targets at Academy that I set up at a 25yd range to "plink" and get that feedback.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The Frontier has a 20" octagonal barrel. The large loop? It's mostly for shooting with gloves on in the cold, but some just like it better in general. I think it's a fashion thing for some folks, too.

I'd get the Frontier with the regular loop and see if you like it. If you still want the large loop, $50 later for one from Henry is a good deal, well worth it if that's what it takes to get the rifle set up the way you want it.
 
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