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Looking to start shooting silhouette matches.
What's more accurate, or is there really not much of a difference.?
 

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I have both and the target is more accurate, plus I think the target model points a little more naturally. You'll want to have the trigger improved on either rifle you choose. My vote is buy the drop in trigger/hammer assembly from Kidd Innovation. Very crisp, no take up and has an over travel adjustment. About 1.5 lbs of trigger pull. Cost is $105 and take about 10 minutes to drop into your trigger housing.
 

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I have an SR22. It has the target barrel and has a great heft to it. I have shot silhouette years ago with a bolt Marlin. I would love to give it a try with SR22.
 

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The target barrel is more accurate and is easier to hold steady in the offhand position. I tried one yesterday and almost bought it as I really liked its balance. For standing silhouette you will want as good a single-stage trigger as you can get - light, quick, crisp, and smooth will help get the shot off when the reticle is where you want it.
 

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I have a carbine. By the time I have emptied a 25 shot magazine I have drove a couple plastic golf balls so far away I have to hold over to hit them. How big are these silhouettes you want to shoot?
 

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I have both, the target model is more accurate of the two.
 

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The difference in accuracy is hard to tell, in off hand shooting. Off the bench the target groups are about half the average size of the carbine.
The biggest difference is the weight and stability the heavier barrel provides, it is simply a more stable platform. I would buy the target model, change the trigger as I mentioned earlier, add the bolt buffer and the trigger group pins from Kidd and do a bunch of ammo testing to find the ammo that rifle likes best. I actually have 3 10/22's, each rifle shoots a different ammo best. My wife shoots the target model, it performs best with Hi Velocity from Aguila, Fiocchi and CCI Mini Mags. The carbine prefers CCI STD Velocity. My custom Kidd 10/22 is the most accurate with Eley Tenex but I don't think that gun really should be compared to the other two.
 

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Ammo accuracy is pretty simple. CCI standard velocity is as accurate as anything out there. Standard velocity is stout enough to make a semi auto function but it is sub sonic. My 10/22 shoots about 1.5" groups at 50 yards with mini mags, it shoots well under .5" at 50 yards with standard velocity. No telling what it would shoot off a bench. I am just resting on a tree. 22lr always does better with sub sonic ammo. About 1080 fps is the velocity sweet spot for the 22 lr. Look at the velocity of the high end target ammo.
 

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I just got some new plastic golf balls to shoot in my field. The plastic golf ball is 1 3/4". When you throw the plastic golf ball out into a field the majority of the golf ball is covered by grass plus some of them roll into depressions in the field. So with CCI Standard Velocity ammo everyone in my family is consistently hitting a target smaller than 1" either standing shooting offhand or braced on a tree. I really doubt there is a difference between the carbine and target model of the 10/22 other than the money you spend on a rifle. I haven't done anything other than mount a Simmons 8 Point 4x fixed power scope and a 25 round magazine on the rifle. Oh yes, I have put thousands of rounds down the pipe since 1986 when I bought the rifle.

People say cleaning the barrel on a rifle will wear it out. That is horse hockey. I have cleaned the barrel on my rifle hundreds of times. If you attend a NRA smallbore match the shooters clean the barrel between each string of shots. The competitive shooters are hitting a target the size of a pencil eraser every time at 50 yards. The results are usually so close the judges need a micrometer to score the cards.
 

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I,ve got a stainless steel carbine and I'm quite pleased with the accuracy. I'm using cheap $30 a brick topshot competition ammo.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1440873032.331297.jpg

Thats a 10 shot group from 50 meters.
 

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Ammo accuracy is pretty simple. CCI standard velocity is as accurate as anything out there. Standard velocity is stout enough to make a semi auto function but it is sub sonic. My 10/22 shoots about 1.5" groups at 50 yards with mini mags, it shoots well under .5" at 50 yards with standard velocity. No telling what it would shoot off a bench. I am just resting on a tree. 22lr always does better with sub sonic ammo. About 1080 fps is the velocity sweet spot for the 22 lr. Look at the velocity of the high end target ammo.
So you shoot LESS than half inch groups, with a standard 10/22 carbine, with any old standard velocity 22 ammo, with a $30 scope, leaning against a tree at 50 yards..........is that the story? That would be some mighty fine shooting.

To the OP.........buy the target model. The barrel is much better, has a tighter "match" style chamber. That along with the increased weight, will make it considerably more accurate than a carbine when using good ammo.
 

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So you shoot LESS than half inch groups, with a standard 10/22 carbine, with any old standard velocity 22 ammo, with a $30 scope, leaning against a tree at 50 yards..........is that the story? That would be some mighty fine shooting.

To the OP.........buy the target model. The barrel is much better, has a tighter "match" style chamber. That along with the increased weight, will make it considerably more accurate than a carbine when using good ammo.
OK, I am the idiot. I do not know anything about winning a smallbore match.
 

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I didn't say you were an idiot, nor did I say you were not doing what you claimed. What I DID say, is that given the parameters you set forth.......if you consistently shoot that good.......that was some mighty fine shooting. Personally I can't find that kind of ammo consistency aside from match grade stuff. And I sure couldn't do it shooting off a tree branch. You must be way more steady than I.
 

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I didn't say you were an idiot, nor did I say you were not doing what you claimed. What I DID say, is that given the parameters you set forth.......if you consistently shoot that good.......that was some mighty fine shooting. Personally I can't find that kind of ammo consistency aside from match grade stuff. And I sure couldn't do it shooting off a tree branch. You must be way more steady than I.
CCI standard velocity is match grade ammo. In the event an ammo oder is late or back ordered CCI standard velocity is used in NRA smallbore matches. People who shoot smallbore matches use CCI standard velocity to practice. When you enter a NRA smallbore match ammo is part of the entry fee. That way everyone is shooting the same ammo.

If you look closely there is only a small difference in the shape of the bullet. until recently the velocity of CCI standard velocity was 1083 fps.

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http://www.midwayusa.com/product/84...ox-of-500-10-boxes-of-50?cm_vc=ProductFinding
 

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I admit I practice with CCI STD Velocity to keep the cost down, but I shoot the open class BR50 competition, using Eley Tenex, there is a relative comparison between the two ammo's. Eley Tenex averages .168 out of my Kidd Bench Rest rifle, CCI is .328.
The original post was what rifle to get to shoot silhouette matches, the carbine or the target. There is nothing wrong with the carbine, but the target rifle is more accurate and some easier to hold steady.
Barrel harmonics, air density and temperature are all factors in rifle accuracy. There are numerous other factors that come into play as well, far too many to list all here but, bedding, free floating the barrel, pressure screws in the forearm and ammo selection are just a few. The factory Ruger trigger is not conducive to good accuracy, that is why my carbine and target model have Kidd single stage triggers and the Bench rifle has the two stage trigger, set at 3 oz. on each stage. Go to www.accurateshooter.com, there is a comparison chart of 55 different ammos tested at 50, 75 and 100 yards, using a world class Bleiker rifle for the tests.
 
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