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Maybe a dumb question but seems the only place since this includes "sights". I have trouble getting my neck bent enough to easily get the sights lined up on my 10/22. I think it must be "old man syndrome". if the rifle is slightly pointed at a downward angle, there is no way I can get things lined up and bring the sight at the end of the barrel down into the sight closest to me. In order to do that I can't keep the butt fully flat against my shoulder. I have to go to the extreme of only putting the corner of it against me. If I am sighting on the level I can just barely bring the sights together. If I am pointing somewhat upward from level, then no problem.

I may be the only one that has ever had this trouble. Maybe I will have to forget the 10/22 and stick with the pistol. Any suggestions on how to make this more comfortable?
 

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Not dumb...unless you are young and/or have a rubber neck and eagle eyes the factory sights are a real pita...

Also with the sights being so low...the heel drop on the butt is not enough...again if you have a rubber neck and can lean/bend enough to shoulder the stock correctly and see the factory sights fine...

Otherwise get aftermarket sights that are higher up...

And/or a red dot or scope...

And/or a stock with more heel drop...

Personally...I had to do all four...:mad:

but it's great now... :D

Sight options... Williams peep sights...Tech Sights...Nodak NDS-26 rail sight combo...True Sights....google them...some of them put the sights as high as a scope...that will put the stock back down on your shoulder...then add a cheek rest to make it solid...

Just got a Bushnell TRS-25 red dot...like it for 100' or less but a 1-4 or 2-7 scope is way better imo...the red dot has no magnification so while it is infinitely better than iron sights it is not as accurate a good but small scope...
 

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I bought this stock specifically because it had more heel drop than any other and also a removable 1.5" extension on the LOP and a removable cheek rest...then I modified the cheek rest to fit me perfectly...

A shorter LOP plus more heel drop plus raising the eye-level of the sights/scope/red dot an additional 3/4" above the factory sights will allow you to keep your head upright...



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sort of hard for me to tell from your posting..

But instead of just laying your check down on the stock's check area, one should stretch your neck forward as far as you can (what they call "turkey neck" for check weld on the stock), as you do your check will come down to meet the stock.
With the 10/22 and iron sights, or even a center fire rifle, no worries about getting the end of a scope kicked into your eye or worrying about eye relief, just getting a good turkey neck and check down into the stock.

usually with the 10/22's , for most people, when they turkey neck, iron sights line up well, but with scopes they find themselves look at the bottom edge of the ring of the scope.

The arm that's the has the trigger hand/finger on it, it's elbow should be held high so the arm is parallel to the ground, this forms a good high pocket on the shoulder for the but stock.

Again, hard to discuss on the web, tried to find some good pix to share, but can't find one at a good angle. In person it's easier to show and correct.
But for someone with injuries to the neck or shoulders, it's comfortable do-able.
We've had hundreds of bone stock 10/22 at events.. and teaching the check weld on them.. the biggest problem is the cheap scope with tall rings straight from the sportinggoods store that is just too tall and a check pad is needed. We've fashioned them out of duct tape and cardboard at the events since the stock sights are a PIA to adjust even for 4moa shootings.
 

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The biggest problem is the cheap scope with tall rings that is just too tall and a check pad is needed. We've fashioned them out of duct tape and cardboard at the events since the stock sights are a PIA to adjust even for 4moa shootings.
You should give stretch wrap and foam a try over the tape and cardboard for the same purpose I guarantee you will love it... :D

I had rifles for over 40 years and never liked scopes...only had a scope to begin w/ due to my son who was into competition air rifles in the 90s...it had a thumbhole stock with sculpted cheek rest at the right spot for a 40mm scope with 1/2" tall rings (I consider those way too high for a 10/22) which were correct for that gun due to the stock and that the rings attach directly to the receiver like any other bolt action 22...when the gun got sold...the scope stayed with us...I put in on the 10/22...hated it...however...I didn't make the connection regarding cheek rest and ring height...for the 10/22 it needed shorter rings and raised cheek...

Some 15 years later I get back into shooting the 10/22 for myself...initially it was bought for the family to plink with and I was not really into 22s that much at the time...now I find I can't see worth beans with or w/o my glasses... :mad:

So I put the honking brick of a scope back on...

Still hate it...and the gun even at a light weight 7.5 lbs is too heavy for me with shoulder problems...:mad:

So then I was committed to coming up with the right combination of peep/post/height to be able to make it work right w/o the weight of the scope...went to the trouble of making my own custom sights...

Fine for 100' but I was wanting 100M...the sights could do 100M well enough when I was 30-40 even 50...now forget it...not happening...

Bought an aluminum barrel to offset the weight of the scope...and that Fajen stock at the same time for more heel drop and cheek rest...infinitely better...still hated the scope for weight...and overall size and still didn't FULLY appreciate the value of the perfect cheek rest...hated the brick of cheek rest that Fajen stock had out of the box...

Went back/forth for a while between custom irons w/ cheek piece removed and honking scope with funky cheek piece added...loved my irons for as far as I could see...but that is only 100'...:mad:

Decided to split the difference and get a better quality, smaller, lighter scope...and mount as close to the same eye level as my raised peep sight as possible...

Along the way somewhere a forum member suggested youtube theNSSF and found this video from Ryan Cleckner...if you take his advice VERY seriously you will like the results...if you have to move/adjust anything once you open your eye it is less than perfect...and you CAN make it perfect if you want to...


Set up Your Scope for Success - Rifle Shooting Technique - NSSF Shooting Sportscast - YouTube

I use pipe insulating foam and stretch wrap to find out what shape/height I need for perfection first...going shooting with it that way is no problem if you do it right...much cleaner, faster, easier than any other method of prototyping/fitting a custom rest...

It took me a long while and a whole bunch of iterations to zero in on the perfect cheek rest and eye level and I got very, very close on matching scope eye-level to peep sight eye level but never spot on for both...until I mounted my 28mm scope directly to the receiver with no rail...had to modify a set of rings to do it...worked great...eye level was matched up perfectly...only problem was I could no longer swap back and forth easily as the peep sight mounted on the tip off rail...and the scope had to be removed from the rings to get the rings off the receiver...

Close but no cigar...:mad:

Good news for me was that as I got used to the scope and fine tuned the ergonomics and cheek rest of the stock it occurred to me that I had NO use for the irons any more...bad news is the gun is still a WHOLE LOT LIGHTER w/o the scope...so I really don't want to have to leave on all the time no matter what...that kept bringing me back to irons...and the reason the cheek rest is sloped down to the rear is that I was close enough on eye level between low mounted scope and peep sight that slightly rocking the gun up just a tad to slide my cheek down a bit off the perfect perch for the scope (including ideal eye relief)...still within the "sweet spot range" but less than perfect as it was not the purely natural position...but not at all up high with the point of the heel poking the shoulder...

Finally...I got a Bushnell TRS-25 red dot...it mounts to the tip off rail with the exact same eye level as the 2-7x28 scope with Weaver Low rings mounted to the same rail...swapping back and forth takes less than one minute...red dot is a full 1/2 lb less weight...great for fast shooting at 50 yards or less...probably at least double that with young eyes...

No need for irons at all now...no reason to go back...the red dot is 4oz with superior sighting to the irons (actually aluminum) that weighed 2oz...splitting hairs on the weight with much superior "optics" and the identical eye level as the scope with fast change out...

I LIKE IT... :D

Best for last...while out evaluating the red dot and swapping from scope to dot I decided to see how good I could shoot with NO SIGHTS...NO RED DOT...NO SCOPE...

What made me try it was due to the fact that when I first got the red dot installed (my first time using one)...it was as I hoped the perfect eye level due to the fact that at that point my cheek rest is/was the exact same one shown in picture above...already perfected...I couldn't have it up against my face and shouldered in the "pocket" in its most natural position and NOT have my eye focused right on the POI if I pulled the trigger...

Of course there is a lot more error compared to the scope and/or dot...however...I was pleasantly surprised to see I had no problem hitting the pop can at 10-20 yards with NO sights...didn't even have to attempt to line up the barrel as you might a shotgun...just put the gun in firing position and hit the can...past 20 yards out to 100' I was not hitting every time but if it were a gallon milk jug...no problem...

Now that is not any skill on my part...it did prove to me that the stock as a 'package' including a grip that I can't change...a butt pad that goes right where it should every time...combined with an ideal cheek rest is worth every bit off effort it took to get it there and I shoot close range off hand and any reasonable size target with no sights way more accurately and with NO EFFORT than I would have ever thought possible...

Then it occurred to me that is exactly how I have shot shotguns all my life with just a bead on the muzzle without ever thinking about it...
 

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This is one stretch wrapped on...pipe insulating foam...thick...already has a curve to "saddle" onto the stock back...

The foam compresses a lot...just wrap one piece of foam on super tight...check it...keep adding layers and cutting layers to shape until the contour is perfect for you...once you done it a few times over it is very fast and very easy...very consistent...very comfortable...



The plastic stock w/ black leather is a combination of that stock with the cheek piece removed...then I built it up out of expanding foam...then sculpted it...I like it a ton better with a nice cutout for the jawbone...makes it easy to get eye over the bore w/o rubber necking and putting a kink you your neck...after that was all shaped I wrapped in leather...then once I got done experimenting around with scope and sight eye level heights I added a final piece consisting of pipe foam shaped to fit and covered that with leather...

That plastic stock did not have a good back bone for simply adding a wood piece shaped to fit with screws like Cleckner does...but with any factory stock you can just screw on a piece of finished hardwood the way you like it after using temporary method with foam and stretch wrap to get the ideal size/shape...done...no need for a wrap...

I am actually planning on modifying the wood dsp stock similar fashion to rockdrill's....

I really, really like what he did with his henry...
 
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