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I've got an old walnut std carbine stock for the 10/22 and was thinking of channeling it to fit the heavy bbl, .920. Anybody done this? What is the best way and how much material, & time did it take to do it? I guess the bl clamp needs to be changed? Just wondering if anybody has anything to say about this.
 

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I know what I would do.... Put the walnut stock away and buy a birch "take-off" stock to modify. Those walnut stocks are bringing pretty good $$$ and the birch take-offs can be had for $10 at gun shows. Another good option is to buy an aftermarket stock already cut to .920".

Hogging out a barrel channel is easy if you have shop tools. If you plan on sanding it out, bring your lunch. It's going to take a lot of work to get the channel opened up.

Normally, you can reform the barrel band for the larger barrel and cut a channel in the stock to accommodate the lost diameter of the band. Of course with aftermarket stocks, the barrel band is not even used.
 

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quote:Originally posted by jimbo1096

I've got an old walnut std carbine stock for the 10/22 and was thinking of channeling it to fit the heavy bbl, .920. Anybody done this? What is the best way and how much material, & time did it take to do it? I guess the bl clamp needs to be changed? Just wondering if anybody has anything to say about this.
jimbo,
I agree with Iowegan in terms of using a birch stock rather than an old classic walnut. I've been collectiing or "rescuing" old walnuts including DSP's for several years. These beauties are vanishing too quickly. Use a birch "beater".
I find the channel opening process is speeded up quite a bit by wrapping a 1/2" electrical sweep or proper size socket with 80 grit paper and progressively dropping down to finer paper.
The sweep provides a little more leverage which helps.


Here!


If I can help just let me know!

Good luck!
SD
 

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I know Gary, but this is / or was a beater walnut with cracks and chunks out of it. I've brought it back 90% but it isn't cherry by any means. I may keep it as is. I'm not fond of the black plastic, and about the only other stock besides real wood I like is the grey laminated full length, think it's the Ruger target model?

Song Dawg, not a bad idea. I've got routers, hogging files, rasps and some other stuff. Was thinking of a straight pipe necked down on one end to fit my drill and wrapped with sandpaper. Might be kind of hard to hold onto though. I could fit a bearing into the open end and a handle to put pressure. I don't have a stock vise, just a regular type. Might work if properly padded. I may wait to get a barrel first then measure if there is any taper. Then I can use it to check for fitment. Should the barrel be snug or actually float a little? Just thinking out loud. Anybody got a birch stock they want to send for me to practice on?
 

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quote:Originally posted by Iowegan
Those walnut stocks are bringing pretty good $$$
how much? My blue/walnut std model is worth more than the original 130 or whatever? It is totally stock, only change was a scope.
 

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The walnut stocks with a metal buttplate go for at least $100 in my area. More if they are pristine. Birch stocks seldom bring more than $20 with $10 being more normal.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Iowegan

The walnut stocks with a metal buttplate go for at least $100 in my area. More if they are pristine. Birch stocks seldom bring more than $20 with $10 being more normal.
Yep I agree with Gary on the price of a good conditioned or re-done walnut.
For the past 10 yrs or so I've been rescuing these guys when I can.
I'm embarrassed to admit how many I have! Most with the metal "aluminum" butt plate. My favorites are the early issue SE Overtons. They were beautiful black walnut and a totally different channel configuration. They had a slightly raked forend. Each stock varied slightly in dimensions. Ruger started doing their own walnuts six or so years later in around 1970.They still had the metal plates but were more standardized.


Here's a few of mine.The first is in progress.










Early Overton with the raked forend.


SD
 

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quote:Originally posted by jimbo1096

OOOHHH - very nice. My old liberty model has nice wood. The one I recently rescued is decent. I'm with you - the birch just don't have any class.
Jimbo,
Your old "Liberty Model" is a Ruger made walnut stock. They went to the Celcon (plastic) buttplate that year in Nov. The carbine walnuts were replaced by birch in 1984. They went to maple for a very short time supposedly because of a shortage of birch. Some of the maples are very sweet.

SD
 
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