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Discussion Starter #1
I purchased a new Commander and took it to the range and fired 100 rounds through multiple magazines and three different brands of ball ammo. Three FTF and 28 failures to go completely into battery, I gave up and called Ruger. They are wonderful and the weapon will go back but my question is has anyone else had these issues with this weapon? Any input would be appreciated.
 

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in my first 50 rounds i had a few ftf and and not into batt completely
but after i went home and cleaned it again, my second trip to the range and thereafter was flawless
maybe 300 rounds through it since the first trip, no problems
i am very satisfied with my SR1911 CMD
 

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Thanks for your service Marine as well as the reply. Ordinarily I would have done the same but this was excessive, in my opinion. I do appreciate the help though.
 

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Thank you for the info. I'm happy with their customer service but the weapon is FUBAR as far as I'm concerned. I'm sorry, no weapon should NEED to be broken in. They should run perfectly right out of the box.
 

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Hickok 45 had a video of the CMD with several failure to go into battery. So it does seem to happen to more than one pistol. Most of his failures were with hardball as I recall.
 

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Badge ... My CMD has been perfect since day one (now over 1,000 rounds). Sorry to hear of your issue but suspect that Ruger CS will make it right :)
 

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Thank you for the info. I'm happy with their customer service but the weapon is FUBAR as far as I'm concerned. I'm sorry, no weapon should NEED to be broken in. They should run perfectly right out of the box.
I guess you should never consider buying a Kimber 1911 (or other custom/semi-custom 1911). They state in the manual that break in is required for proper function.

Kimber said:
Kimbers firearms are quality custom pieces. Our firearms are hand fitted to tight tolerances. For proper Break-in of the firearm shoot 400-500 rounds of Quality Factory Ball (230g. FMJ) Ammunition, cleaning and lubricating the gun every 100-150 rounds.
http://www.kimberamerica.com/media/wysiwyg/manual-download/1911Fullsize45.pdf

Dan Wesson said:
We recommend a break-in period of 300-500 rounds before the gun is competition/combat ready
http://cz-usa.com/hammer/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/CZ_1911_Hdbk_lores.pdf
 

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My CMD is a long story, Ruger replaced the first one, it worked fine but shot way low, said the frame was mismachined. Replacement shot low, threw brass in my face, loosey goosey bbl hood fit. Sent it back, they put in a long link to tighten the bbl. Didn't do anything about shooting low, said they don't care. They did install a black sight at my request so I could file it down. All this but VERY few malfunctions on either gun with the exception of one bad Ruger magazine. It is a favorite shooter for me, I don't know if the long link will hold up but so far it's working. I did determine that there is no leade/throat in the bbl so if a bullet is the least bit long, it won't go into battery so take note if you hand load.
All this and I still like the gun, I usually get rid of anything that's this much trouble. Thru the years Ruger has been really good, better than most in quality and service so I'm still a fan. Right now it seems that most of the gun companies are having problems but most of the time you can make it work one way or the other, either warranty or DIY if you really want it to work. Very few are ready to go out of the box. A sign of the times I guess.
 

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Badge, it's your gun, but I sure wouldn't be sending it back so fast. Shoot it, clean it, shoot it, clean it... repeat.

Watch the Hickok45 video someone mentioned. The lightweight CMD he had for his video was doing the same thing, but by the time the video was getting near the end, it stopped jamming.

Some 1911's are tighter than others when new. Some are 100% reliable right out of the box, while others need a little breaking in.

I'd get another 200 rounds of ammo, and clean and lube it after each 50 round box. Get it good and clean, and then get it "wet" with lube. New 1911's tend to like to be run wet.

Good luck, and keep us posted. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sorry Marine. It's a disgrace for a Ruger firearm. While checking the weapon for packing I noted that the slide now will not lock back on an empty magazine. Ruger should be ashamed of themselves turning garbage like this out.
No,.... I do not believe ANY weapon needs hundreds of rounds to " break in ". That's why I use a Glock to protect my lie. They always fire and I have had seven of them in various calibers. But, to all who offered help I thank you.
 

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I'd shoot at least 2-3 hundred rounds to break it in!
 

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with mine I had to polish the feed ramp and add just a little more roll crimp to my reloads. also, since I am as old as dirt and Arthur has moved into my hands and knees, I had to focus on my grip more so than my other auto loaders. I also noted the mags Ruger sends with the pistol worked better than even my Wilson Combat mags with +10% springs. one thing is sure, Ruger CS is second to none, if there is an issue with your CMD they will sort it out. my CMD goes out in the next few days again. I just added some new grips and want to see how they feel.
 

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Thank you for the info. I'm happy with their customer service but the weapon is FUBAR as far as I'm concerned. I'm sorry, no weapon should NEED to be broken in. They should run perfectly right out of the box.
Well... polymer framed semi-autos, such as Glocks, do tend to be extremely reliable right out of the box. With 1911's, however, do just a tiny amount ofresearch and you will quickly find that many do in fact need to be shot a bit to break them in. The slide and frame are both all metal, and you've got quite a bit of metal sliding along metal. 1911 customers tend to want tight guns with little or no "rattle."

So, if you buy a 1911, and expect it to be 100% reliable from day one, it's not unusual to be disappointed. You may get one that is immediately reliable, or you may get one that requires a bit of shooting to smooth it up. If you get one of the latter guns, you have not received a dud.

What you do about yours is certainly your decision, as it is your gun, and Ruger does have excellent customer service. If it were me, as I stated earlier, I'd clean it and lube it well, and shoot it some more before sending it back. Just my two cents.
 

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Well... polymer framed semi-autos, such as Glocks, do tend to be extremely reliable right out of the box. With 1911's, however, do just a tiny amount ofresearch and you will quickly find that many do in fact need to be shot a bit to break them in. The slide and frame are both all metal, and you've got quite a bit of metal sliding along metal. 1911 customers tend to want tight guns with little or no "rattle."

So, if you buy a 1911, and expect it to be 100% reliable from day one, it's not unusual to be disappointed. You may get one that is immediately reliable, or you may get one that requires a bit of shooting to smooth it up. If you get one of the latter guns, you have not received a dud.

What you do about yours is certainly your decision, as it is your gun, and Ruger does have excellent customer service. If it were me, as I stated earlier, I'd clean it and lube it well, and shoot it some more before sending it back. Just my two cents.
This. I've got several(what I tell my wife..) of Colt, Rem, and Ruger and these guys need to be broken in. Some are quick and some are not depending on the tolerance stackup in a particular gun.
 

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Over 1500 rounds through my LW Commander. Flawless so far. To this date I have had no issues with any Ruger firearm. Just my experience.
 

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No. I'm a Ruger man as well. Have a number of them. Just had a problem with one in the past and it was fixed forthwith with no hassles. This however is a horse of another color in my opinion. FedEx is supposed to pick it up tomorrow. I will keep you posted and thank you for all of the comments and help.
 

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As mentioned, 1911's have a lot of bearing surface between the slide and frame. Some break in may be required.

I have a CZ that came quite tight and required about 250 rounds to do so. I researched the gun before purchase and was quite alright with it. It was the best bargain I've ever had in a pistol.

Once you fire them enough, they all rattle, but it's nice to have a tight gun for at least a few years.

Most modern polymer guns have very little surface contact between the slide and frame and are built looser. They are different animals altogether. If you want a low maintenance appliance that's the gun to get. 1911's need more care, proper lubrication, and proper feeding.

In 17 years my 1911 has only had problems related to ammo (reloads) or magazines (one went bad). Once right they stay right until they've had a lot of rounds through them as long as magazines are maintained (replace mags/springs as needed) and recoil and firing pin springs are replaced as needed.
 

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ditto1958 said:
Well... polymer framed semi-autos, such as Glocks, do tend to be extremely reliable right out of the box. With 1911's, however, do just a tiny amount of research and you will quickly find that many do in fact need to be shot a bit to break them in. The slide and frame are both all metal, and you've got quite a bit of metal sliding along metal. 1911 customers tend to want tight guns with little or no "rattle."

So, if you buy a 1911, and expect it to be 100% reliable from day one, it's not unusual to be disappointed. You may get one that is immediately reliable, or you may get one that requires a bit of shooting to smooth it up. If you get one of the latter guns, you have not received a dud.
That is a good summary of the 1911. Add to that the statement of
tolerance build up (in a later post) and you have defined what, most of the
time, is happening with a 1911 that is "being difficult". If you decide to
spend $2,500 to $4,000 on a 1911, then you can very reasonably expect
one that is perfect, out of the box. If you decline to spend that much,
you will find examples of 1911s that are not perfect, no matter who the
manufacturer is.

A 1911 . . can . . be difficult, or a dream. Borrowing a line from a Bill
Murry movie "That's a FACT Jack". ;)

1911 geeks have developed their own process for new 1911s. They do
every one, be it a $2K or a $400 example. In fact, you can go over to the
1911 forum and read many an example of what most of them use.
Here (in no particular order) are just a few of the items in their lists:
~ Hand cycle the slide/frame many times (in hundreds)
~ Check/adjust the extractor
~ Check the disconnecter and then function check
~ Detail strip, clean, oil and reassemble
~ Function check safeties
~ DRY FIRE . . . . a LOT
~ etc.
~ THEN go to the range
 

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All of your comments are spot on for the 1911 platform. Unfortunately I got a pile of POO from Ruger that should have never left the factory. I get the " breakin " stuff but this was not a breakin issue. I'm hopeful and having dealt with Ruger in the past for issues with a weapon, I have no doubt it will return better than it started. Sadly, everyone sends out a crappy weapon once in awhile. I'm looking forward to it's return and hopefully it will be consistent and trustworthy enough for an EDC. Keep you posted.
 
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