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I have a Mini-14 Ranch 195 series, late 90's manufacture. Are these the ones with the thin barrels?
I have the same Series rifle myself. It is the thin barrel. I bought an Accu- Strut stabilizer to put on it, but as yet have not. Mine was a gift in late 1996 or early 1997. I had it a few years before I started acquiring AR's, AK's & SKS's. It has always been my go-to for plunking. I never was a blast through a magazine kinda guy, preferring to hit what I aim at once or twice, instead of spray and pray. Just how I was raised. So, I never really hand the issues others seem too. But I bought the Accu- Strut to put on it anyway.
 

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A dual-clamp barrel strut is likely to enhance accuracy, particularly on early, "Pencil-Barreled" Mini-14s. As per mfr, single-clamp units maybe not so much.

ETA: Various reports (pro/con) about accuracy enhancement due to dual-clamp strut installation on later Mini-14s which have the heavier-profile barrel, and on Mini-30s which appear to have always had a heavier barrel profile than the old Pencil-barreled Mini-14s.

It may well be that such dual-clamp struts enhance accuracy in the heavier barreled rifles, but also possible that the degree of improvement is less than with "Pencil-barreled" Mini-14s. Add to this that there may be many other factors "masking" improvements on any rifle, regardless of barrel profile; Ammo quality/uniformity/Fitment of barreled action to stock/Muzzle condition and Shooter skill are but a few examples.

Adding the dual-clamp, "Drilled" version (lighter weight/less mass near muzzle) of the Accu-Strut to my (Pencil-barrel) 186 series Mini-14 definitely enhanced accuracy. I should add that the rifle was carefully modified prior to installing the strut, and already shooting better than most "Pencil-barrel" Minis. YMMV.
 

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Just a bit of advice, owning a 181-series "pencil barrel":

Try it out first and see if it satisfies your intended needs and desires before spending a bunch of coin. My 181 fired 2-3 MOA after a few mag-dumps to see how it would perform "hot". This was unmodified from the factory as it left it in 1977. And that was shooting 2-3 MOA M193 ammo, poorly supported, and with an impatient shooter (me).

All Mini-14s are different. Mine is at least a low S/N 181, a GB model with a bayo lug and flash hider. Some report GB models had the best barrels, and some report that the Flash Hider and Bayo lug attenuated the barrel whip. Not sure about those - all I can report is my 181GB is as accurate as I intended for it to be, and likely more accurate than I am (or the ammo I shoot). It was never intended as a sniper rifle, but rather a handy carbine deadly out to about 300 meters with iron sights. It is a "pencil barrel".

There are some low-cost checks before you spend some coin on a strut (although an AccuStrut will most likely improve things).
1) Check the gap between the upper and lower halves of the gas block. The gap should be uniform fore-and-aft and starboard-to-port. There should be equal torque in all four gas block screws (usually between 25-30 INCH-pounds). A spark plug gap gauge works well for uniformity, but things like a penny or dime of nickel will work okay - the critical piece being a uniform gap and torque. 9/64 Allen is the wrench to use.
2) If used, check the crown of the barrel and either clean it up yourself through a kit from Brownell's, or have it done by a gunsmith for little coin. A bad crown will certainly affect accuracy.
3) Accept that the Mini-14 is a CARBINE - NOT a sniper rifle. Manage your expectations and try and keep it as light and handy as a carbine should be.
4) M193 ammo works well, but is a 2 MOA ammo at best. Don't chase accuracy your ammo doesn't provide.'
5) Most red-dots are 2-3 MOA, depending on light conditions and intensity of the 'dot. If you use one, consider the lowest common denominator...

For humane rabid 'yote/fox kills out to 300m, I chose to get a Savage Axis II in .223. It came with an OK 3-9X40 scope, is very accurate out to the range interested, and the cost was less than modifying any of my Mini-14s for that range and accuracy. And about as light as any of my Mini-14s...

Just food for thought...
 

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All the above points made by RJF are valuable info.

The "Pencil-barreled" Mini is a good example of the "80/20" (Pareto) Rule, which roughly states that "80% of improvement can be achieved at 20% cost". Improvements beyond that point require steeply-rising cost/effort.
 

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Exalted One
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All the above points made by RJF are valuable info.

The "Pencil-barreled" Mini is a good example of the "80/20" (Pareto) Rule, which roughly states that "80% of improvement can be achieved at 20% cost". Improvements beyond that point require steeply-rising cost/effort.
"The cost of diminishing returns" was pretty much the phrase we used in the Army. Also "perfect is the enemy of good enough". That rankled me for a bit, but is realistic. Mowing my pastures and lawn have devolved into "good enough"...
 
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