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Discussion Starter #1
I ran across a 1968 Standard with 4 3/4" barrel with fixed sights that looks very nice. Looking at the Ruger website I determined the six digit serial number is 468xxx was the last of the run before the change to the dash serial numbers in 1969. It looks clean and well taken care of. The price being asked is almost the same as the newer model offered at the LGS. I know I can deal a little on this unit but it has no box or original paper work. My question is, "Would I be better served to buy a new Standard model?" Are there reasons to buy the older model (pre dash) vs the newer model.
I value your opinions on this.
 

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Hi ...

Just my opinions: Older guns are cool. If you feel that way, get the 1968. It will have some functional differences, but nothing I (opinion) would consider significant. If it's in solid shootable shape, you most likely never wear it out. If it had the box, etc. I'd grab it first, but it doesn't.

However, a newer gun has a more solid warranty (Ruger stands by it's stuff, but you'd be on more solid ground as the first owner of a new gun). Counterpoint - it's probably a Mark III. Many of us don't care for them (lock, loaded indicator, etc.). Easier to get parts and assessories for, though. Plus, one day it too will be an old gun.

Dollar for dollar (same price), I'd go new. I don't think the older one would add anything but a certain amount "coolness" due to age.

Humble opinion ... Joe
 

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I'd go with new. Lots of subtle innovation in the newer models. I'd go for the MKIII, target model with the bull barrel. Adjustable sights, highvis tubes, scope mount included and you can return it immediately if there is a problem. Personally, I like the chamber indicator and the internal safety key system for when my grandchildren come to visit.
I checked out the 22/45 in plastic and didn't care for it.

Bottom line, if your a collector you'll want the old model. If you want state of the art target shooting with lots of options you'll want the MKIII. Of course this is just my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi ...

Just my opinions: Older guns are cool. If you feel that way, get the 1968. It will have some functional differences, but nothing I (opinion) would consider significant. If it's in solid shootable shape, you most likely never wear it out. If it had the box, etc. I'd grab it first, but it doesn't.

However, a newer gun has a more solid warranty (Ruger stands by it's stuff, but you'd be on more solid ground as the first owner of a new gun). Counterpoint - it's probably a Mark III. Many of us don't care for them (lock, loaded indicator, etc.). Easier to get parts and assessories for, though. Plus, one day it too will be an old gun.

Dollar for dollar (same price), I'd go new. I don't think the older one would add anything but a certain amount "coolness" due to age.

Humble opinion ... Joe
Thanks JAS! Good points you make. I am not a collector and if I was being a late run Standard without box etc wouldn't make sense. Also your point on the new gun warranty makes sense to me also. Most of the guns I have I bought new (although many years ago) so there is something about being the first that is special. I do appreciate your opinions because when I read what others think it helps me to come up with a better understanding than what I might do on my own.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'd go with new. Lots of subtle innovation in the newer models. I'd go for the MKIII, target model with the bull barrel. Adjustable sights, highvis tubes, scope mount included and you can return it immediately if there is a problem. Personally, I like the chamber indicator and the internal safety key system for when my grandchildren come to visit.
I checked out the 22/45 in plastic and didn't care for it.

Bottom line, if your a collector you'll want the old model. If you want state of the art target shooting with lots of options you'll want the MKIII. Of course this is just my opinion.
Thanks Mohawk! I was in Phoenix today and went by a small GS and handled a plastic 22/45. I didn't like it either. I have had a plastic gun before (Taurus PT111 in 9mm) and really liked it. But not the 22/45 plastic. I also handled the Mark III target and really liked it for all the same reasons you mention.

I think I will wait until I can save up and get the Mark III target with all the new goodies. Thanks again. CCKen
 

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My friend recently bought the same "68 pistol in very good condition for $225. The seller had some other buyers lined up if my buddy backed out. Seems like the older models in nice condition are getting harder to find. I've seen some Standards & MKI's get sent back to Ruger to get parts replaced & re-blued for very little $. They all came back like factory new. Good luck on your choice.
 

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Thanks Mohawk! I was in Phoenix today and went by a small GS and handled a plastic 22/45. I didn't like it either. I have had a plastic gun before (Taurus PT111 in 9mm) and really liked it. But not the 22/45 plastic. I also handled the Mark III target and really liked it for all the same reasons you mention.

I think I will wait until I can save up and get the Mark III target with all the new goodies. Thanks again. CCKen
I just picked up the MkIII/512, 5 1/2" bull barrel at JGSales in Prescott for 339.00. Ordered the HiViz front and rear sight from Ruger in Prescott and I couldn't be happier with my choice. Ran 300 rds through it right out of the box and it never missed a beat. Shooting's fun again at 3cents a round.:) I have a collection of large caliber rifles and a Ruger P90 but somehow I couldn't stop thinking "50 cents!" every time I pulled the trigger. Now it's 10/22 and MkIII all day and maybe one mag of 5.56 just for giggles.

In addition to "shoot-n-see" targets, We bring a bag of old golf balls and charcoal briquettes. Golf balls sure do fly when you hit them right. The charcoal briquettes explode in a cloud of black dust. No doubt when you hit. Target shooting is fun again.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I just picked up the MkIII/512, 5 1/2" bull barrel at JGSales in Prescott for 339.00. Ordered the HiViz front and rear sight from Ruger in Prescott and I couldn't be happier with my choice. Ran 300 rds through it right out of the box and it never missed a beat. Shooting's fun again at 3cents a round.:) I have a collection of large caliber rifles and a Ruger P90 but somehow I couldn't stop thinking "50 cents!" every time I pulled the trigger. Now it's 10/22 and MkIII all day and maybe one mag of 5.56 just for giggles.

In addition to "shoot-n-see" targets, We bring a bag of old golf balls and charcoal briquettes. Golf balls sure do fly when you hit them right. The charcoal briquettes explode in a cloud of black dust. No doubt when you hit. Target shooting is fun again.
Mohawk - Hey I like your idea of used golf balls and briquettes as targets! Makes me grin just thinking of those briquettes exploding.
JGSales - my buddy talks about that place all the time and I have never been there. I would have to drive 2/3 or the way across AZ to get to JGSales but sure is nice country. I'd wait until summer when I can escape the moccasin melting heat here in the sunny shifting sands of SW Arizona. Thanks for your thoughts. happy trails to you!
 

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Mohawk - Hey I like your idea of used golf balls and briquettes as targets! Makes me grin just thinking of those briquettes exploding.
JGSales - my buddy talks about that place all the time and I have never been there. I would have to drive 2/3 or the way across AZ to get to JGSales but sure is nice country. I'd wait until summer when I can escape the moccasin melting heat here in the sunny shifting sands of SW Arizona. Thanks for your thoughts. happy trails to you!
You may also want to consider crackers, like generic Saltines. They're easy to see, generally break very visibly when hit, and feed the birds when you're done (or dissolve in the rain).

If there's anything I hate more than retrieving shot-up targets (cans, balloons, broken clays, etc.), it's using a range after some else who didn't bother to pick up after themselves.

Crackers and similar frangible foodstuffs (as long as their use isn't excessive or prohibited) don't need to be picked up.

Good luck ... Joe
 

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You may also want to consider crackers, like generic Saltines. They're easy to see, generally break very visibly when hit, and feed the birds when you're done (or dissolve in the rain).

If there's anything I hate more than retrieving shot-up targets (cans, balloons, broken clays, etc.), it's using a range after some else who didn't bother to pick up after themselves.

Crackers and similar frangible foodstuffs (as long as their use isn't excessive or prohibited) don't need to be picked up.

Good luck ... Joe
I second the frustration on going to your favorite shooting spot and finding a pile of gargage from the previous shooters. I like the idea of soda crackers. That's a new one on me and makes perfect sense. Thanks for the tip.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You may also want to consider crackers, like generic Saltines. They're easy to see, generally break very visibly when hit, and feed the birds when you're done (or dissolve in the rain).

If there's anything I hate more than retrieving shot-up targets (cans, balloons, broken clays, etc.), it's using a range after some else who didn't bother to pick up after themselves.

Crackers and similar frangible foodstuffs (as long as their use isn't excessive or prohibited) don't need to be picked up.

Good luck ... Joe
Thanks Joe! This is a great idea also and frugal too! If I hang around here long enough I might get some good learning!

My mother said she used to shoot at candle flames at night with her 22 rifle. Said near misses cause the flame to flicker, hits on the bottom end of the flame put the flame out immediately and if you hit the candle it was time to go home. This was back around Beloit, Ohio in the mid '30s. Different time and different place.
 
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