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Discussion Starter #1
Going to be purchasing either Mark III or the 22/45. At age 65 I am buying partially for my use but also very much for use by my "kids" and grandkids...both now and hopefully for many years in the future.., even after I am long gone.

What are the thoughts on the long-term durability of a 22/45. I have a couple of guns I inherited from my father and they are still in fine working condition...is the Polymer frame expected to endure for 2-3 generations of probably light to moderate general use. Is there any issue with heat/cold and time or wear having any impact on the Polymer...what about de-coloration?

BTW...how long has the Polymer frame been in use by Ruger and what about other mfgs? Is the Glock frame Polymer?

Thanks...back to football :) Tom R
 

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The polymer frame came out with the Mark II 22/45 IN 1992. I have never heard of problems with wear or long term durability. There really isnt anything that causes high friction wear on the frame, as the bolt reciprocates inside the steel receiver. Buy your 22/45 with confidence
 

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The polymer frame came out with the Mark II 22/45 IN 1992. I have never heard of problems with wear or long term durability. There really isnt anything that causes high friction wear on the frame, as the bolt reciprocates inside the steel receiver. Buy your 22/45 with confidence
^^^^Ditto
neither cold, heat, water, cleaning solvent, or anything short of a hammer or fire will have any effect on the frame. I would say you could buy it with confidence that who ever is lucky enough to inherit it will be able to enjoy it for generations to come!
 

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^^^^Ditto
neither cold, heat, water, cleaning solvent, or anything short of a hammer or fire will have any effect on the frame. I would say you could buy it with confidence that who ever is lucky enough to inherit it will be able to enjoy it for generations to come!
You do need to watch what you use to clean a polymer frame. Some cleaning chemicals WILL attack polymer frames. CLP and Hoppes are safe.
 

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You do need to watch what you use to clean a polymer frame. Some cleaning chemicals WILL attack polymer frames. CLP and Hoppes are safe.
Good to know! since those are the exact two I use I have never had a problem. Do you know of any specific solutions which affect poylmer frames so I can stay away?
 

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I plan on handing mine down over a few generations..... ;) :D
 

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All I can say is that there are a lot of old Glocks in circulation. I had a heavily used second generation G22 and as far as I know, it still works perfectly.
 

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Well if any if this madness goes through it will be against the law to hand down anything. And they are flawless they are extremely durable. I take every pin and spring out tk scrub it down and the thing is perfect.
 

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I have had a 22/45 for 11 years and it still looks and shoots as good as new after over 5000 rounds. They are designed to last a lifetime or longer, but like others have said, use a Polymer safe cleaner such as Birchwood Casey as some solvents will stain the finish or damage it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I am leaning toward a Target, 5.5" barrel, replaceable grips and then changing to optic front sight. Is the front sight a screw on change?

I do really like the MKIII Hunter, stainless with 6.88" barrel but after shooting it I believe I prefer the grip angle of the 22/45...seem quite a few others have the same conclusion.

I rented a Hunter at my range and need to rent a 22/45 to confirm that I like the grip feel better...but will be awhile before I can get there.

I have watched a couple of field strip videos and I am pretty confident that will not be too hard...I need to google a detail strip video...that has me a bit more intimidated :) I have a WWII CK 27 .32ACP semi-auto that I found a field strip video and I have had it apart 4-5 times now and cleaned a couple of times...have not tried detail disassembly yet though.

Thanks...Tom R
 

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Takedown is not "hard" just different then your normal handgun. I strip mine to nothing every time. Just takes a few times of doing it then there is no issue whatsoever. In fact I have fun doing it. 5.5 is what I have. It's great out if the box. Sights are hard to see wit black targets so I'd recommend the fiber optic ones. Also the mag release disconnect. Other then that. Fantastic pistol. Heavy but awesome.
 

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Sorry again. The hunter is very expensive compared the bull barrel and I didn't see it being worth the money. Plus grip angle on it 22/45 is incredible!
 

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The front sight is held in place by a screw. The rear sight is drifted into a dovetail and held by a set screw. It is not simply held in place by a screw like the front. After you remove the set screw, it takes considerable force to remove the sight body. If you use something like Williams Fire Sights(recommended) you dont remove the rear sight "body" but simply the rear sight blade, and replace the blade with the one from Williams with the fiber optic rods. To do this... remove the elevation screw(the big one on top, in the center of the sight blade. Drift out the small pin on the side of the rear sight body. Carefully lift the rear sight blade up and out of the rear sight body, and catch the two tiny springs that are under the sight blade. Im pretty sure you need to re-use them for the replacement blade. Replacement springs dont come with the Williams Fire Sight kit. Install in reverse order. Easier, and quicker to do than type up the description how to do it. Good luck. The 22/45 Target is one of the best 22 Autoloading pistols ever.
 
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