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I recently purchased some Federal 100 grain soft point bullets. I loaded them in front of 37.5 grains of IMR -4350. Lymans reloading manual indicates a C.O.L of 2.650. Thee bullets have a cannelure and by seating them to the cannelure the C.O.L is 2.570. I'm concerned about increased pressure. Any advice is welcome, because I would like to keep the face I have in one piece!
 

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I show a maximum loading of 39.5 grains of 4350, further the starting load is 35.5 grains. I would start at the starting load and work my way up very slowly looking for signs of pressure.

Your load is about halfway up the starting to the maximum. Further the Lyman 49th edition shows a OAL of 2.630. Hope this helps. Note I would only use a slight taper crimp, therefore you shouldn't have any problem with excessive pressure.

I've used this loading in my Savage 110 numerous times, with the cannelure style bullet, but I do start with the starting loads as indicated and work my way up to where I get acceptable accuracy and feel comfortable with the pressures.
 

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Gray wolf, Here's a classic case where "shopping for answers" in different manuals may get you in trouble. You can't just take any old bullet and seat it to a mystery depth ... then expect the cartridge to perform accurately and safely. What you really need to do is .... buy bullets that are the same brand as a reloading manual (or vise versa). The manual will give you the recommended bullet seating depth in the form of cartridge overall length and will list powder charges that have actually been pressure tested with the specific bullet.

I seriously doubt you will find any specific load data for a Federal 100gr soft point, however since Federal and Speer are owned by the same parent company (ATK) chances are a Speer 100gr soft point will be the same bullet only without a cannelure. BTW, bullets with cannelures are designed for specific cartridges where the COL is at the recommended length when the cannelure is centered on the case mouth. There are at least 4 cartridges that use a .243" / 6mm bullets (243 Win, 6mm Rem, 243 Short Mag, and 240 Wby), but it's obvious your bullets were not intended for a 243 Win cartridge. However they will work but the cannelure will not align with the case mouth when the bullet is seated to the proper depth.

The Speer manual has two 100gr bullets and one 105gr .... all with the same load data. The first 100gr is a Boat tail Spire Point (lead tip, no cannelure) with a cartridge overall length of 2.625". The other 100gr bullet is a Grand Slam SP with a cannelure and is specified with a COAL of 2.580". The 105gr Spitzer SP has a COAL of 2.625". With IMR 4350 powder, the minimum load is 37.5gr (2643 fps) and the max load is 41.5gr (2880 fps). None of these bullets have a COAL of 2.570".
 

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Lowegan, I had some Speer (Federal) 100 grain with the cannelure, in fact I had at least 200 of them. As I mentioned I loaded them using the starting load, with a very slight crimp right on the cannelure. I don't believe I went up much over 1.0 grains from starting. I noticed the round was very inaccurate, however suitable for plinking, burning up some IMR 4350. Since that time, I increased the OAL to the recommended 2.630. The accuracy increased dramatically, however I never did increase the powder much over half the starting load. Further I didn't much care for the cannelure sticking out the end of the case.
 

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If you have 1 bullet diameter worth of straight shank in the neck, the cannelure is kinda irrelevant. I tend to ignore cannelures more often than not, simply because it's exceedingly rare that the cannelures are perfectly placed to give the desired bullet jump that I'm looking for - which varies from one rifle to the next according to their particular chamber and "personal preference".

Like Iowegan mentioned, you can't just dig up data for any ol' bullet of the same weight and think that it applies to your particular bullet. Too many factors come into play, jacket metallurgy, bearing surface length, tail profile, ogive design, bullet jump, etc etc. Way too much can change from one bullet to the next that would completely negate the recommendations that were ideal for the other bullet. In general, if I can't find data for a particular bullet, I'll dig up the minimum charge for any bullet in its class for a given powder, make sure I'm not below any "DNR" load for any other bullet in its weight, check that for charge density against my seating length and particular case capacity, then start my load work from there. As long as I can confirm that the minimum low end is still safe (not too light), then I can build up from there.
 

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I take it a step further from Varminterror's post. I don't buy bullets with a cannelure for any rifle except a semi-auto where I will apply a crimp. It would be rare to find a 243 Win in anything but a bolt action where a crimp does nothing more than pre-damage the bullet so its slick side bullets and no crimp for my bolt action rifles.

As for a powder charge .... I learned to go with a powder charge that develops the same velocity as a factory load with the same bullet weight, which is 2960 fps for a 100gr 243 Win. I then use the recommended seating depth in a matching manual as a minimum COL. By extending the COL in .005" increment test batches, you can find the optimum seating depth where groups are the smallest. It is quite common for a 243 Win to develop throat erosion where bullets are seated out so far the cartridges won't fit in the magazine. In that case, you either have a single shot or you have a repeater with less than optimum accuracy.
 

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OK, I stand corrected, I've been reloading for over 40+ years, and generally don't use a rifle bullet with a cannelure, with the exception of the .223 in AR's. I got the 6mm bullets at a gun show a few years ago and noted the cannelure after I started reloading them not too often long ago. Although I didn't have any obvious trouble shooting them, other than the previously mentioned accuracy problem, which I feel was due to the projectile not protruding far enough into the throat of the chamber. Note after having the cannelure of the bullet exposed the accuracy improved considerably, and had plenty of surface for the cartridge case to seat on. Note these were PSP also, such as the original poster stated his were.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Iowegan, Loose Noose, thanks for the response. I was digging into the batch of bullets I bought, (600), I found one that still had some of the case neck attached! So I bought pulled bullets! Iowegan hit it right on the head! I'm going to call the company I bought them from ( no need to mention names) and see if I can return them. I picked up a box of Sierra 100 gr Spitzer and loaded up 5 with a starting load of 35.5 gr. of IMR 4350. The recommended length was easy to achieve, and they cycle nicely in my Remington 700 heavy barrel. Buy cheap you get cheap!!!!!!!!!
 

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I do enjoy handloading and shooting the .243 Winchester, my Remington 770 really likes the Remington factory load 100 Gr Core Lokt. It also has a cannelure which dislike a lot, so I measured a box of 20 rounds got a average OAL, bought 100 Core Lokt's from Midway USA. By measuring some of the 100 Grainers I discovered there where some inconsistencies in their lengths. So I just backed out my seating die 1/4 a turn for each round, then turn the seating back down to maintain a consistent OAL. With 45.5 Gr IMR-7828 SSC @ 2.663 OAL I feel I have a good copy of the factory Remington Load. Hodgdon web site doesn't show data for the 100 grain bullet, but the 2013 paper back shows 100 gr Speer BTSP @2.650 with IMR-4350 starting load is 38.5 for 2760 FPS & Max is 42.0 for 2958 from a 24 inch barrel.
 

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SirRuger; Hodgdon web site doesn't show data for the 100 grain bullet said:
Hodgdon does show loads for 100 grain bullets, you just have to scroll down to that weight. I load 100 grain Nosler Partitions over H-1000.........robin :cool:
 

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Gray Wolf,

The Cartridge Overall Length figures seen in the manuals are mostly usable to indicate the length at which the publisher tested the cartridges.

For the rest of us, basically forget it!!!!!!!!!!!

Our concern should lay in two areas, first a round that is as long as possible that still functions through the rifles magazine and/or in and out of the rifles chamber without hanging up somewhere along the line.

Then the second issue is that providing The hand loader is doing a proper "work up" with each powder and bullet and brass and primer and not simply jumping in at or near maximum listed loads from a reliable source, it matters NOT if your loaded rounds match the published figures.

Load for the rifle in use! If the bullet in question has a cannelure for the typical bolt action or single shot it matters NOT if the cannelure is above or below the case mouth as long as the case mouth has a good firm grip on the bullet.

In short, there is MUCH wasted effort put in to thinking about C.O.L..

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 
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