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I'm new to reloading and have alot of cases of 38 and 357 I have speer 158 grain bullets and unique powder was looking for some reloading data
 

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I'm new to reloading and have alot of cases of 38 and 357 I have speer 158 grain bullets and unique powder was looking for some reloading data
Specify your bullet type , in 158 gr. weight , Speer sells a soft swaged lead LSWC , LSWC-HP , LRN
And Jacketed bullets in TMJ-FN, UCHP, GDHP and UCSP .

The load data is very different between the Lead and Jacketed.

So ...whatcha got ... I've got 50 years of reloading Unique in 38 special and 357 magnum but the details are important in this hobby.

Speer makes a real good loading manual...I've been using them since 1970...get one .
Gary
 

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gwpercle is right on. I was going to basically post what he did. If your 158 grain Speers are the soft swaged SWC's, I had several boxes of them some years back (90's) and you had to keep the fps down to light loads as they were terrible for leading the barrel up. My loads weren't even 'hot', below 1000 fps. They're just a 800 fps or so target bullet for 38 Special IMO. Work for that as long as you keep the loadings down. Never bought anymore, I could cast better 158 grain than them.
 

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Speer is usually Allants data. Dont get your data off of threads. Alliant has an easy to use sight.
 

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I will not use data from the internet. Reloading manuals only. I will get data online if it corroborates the date from manuals. It is amazing how much affect a tenth of grain can have one way or the other.
 

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As far as the Speer online data goes... I have the last two Speer manuals and the data online is the same. I once found a discrepancy when I had the #14 book, I called Speer and they said the online data is the new data, I bought the #15 book and behold, the online data matched the new book.
Also, near the top of the page where it says "CARTRIDGE", Speer told me see if there is data there first before choosing from the PDF files below, that is the newest that hasn't even been published yet.
I would trust the Speer online data.
 

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Hodgdon has a lot of data for their powders on their website. Alliant has a good site too. Hornaday wants you to pay for their data, but they have an App that allows you to pay for only the calibers you use. Lyman has a good manual and is the only one I've seen that give data for a bunch of lead bullets. Random reloading data on the internet needs to be checked against reliable data from commercial sources, which is why you should have 3 or 4 different manuals. Not all powders are listed with all bullets, there are many combinations of components that are not listed. Reload with listed data using listed (or equilavent components) until you know what you are doing. DO NOT mix and match components until you've had a few years of sucessful experience and talked with experienced reloaders.

Oh, the most important thing: get 10 posts and go to the Library and read everything there posted by IOWEGEAN!!!! Good luck and come back often with questions.
 

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My opinion is that a small investment can pay off big time. The Lyman Pistol and Revolver Handbook is my bible. The only time I strayed from it is during the (thankfully) past Obama-created shortage of everything gun-related. Then, I was lucky to get any powders at all, and sometimes the new powder wasn't in the Lyman book. On those rare occasions I went to the powder-makers sites to fill in the gaps.
 

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Bought my first manuals in 1969 - Lyman, Speer, and Sierra. Then picked up a Hornady because my source of supply for jacketed anything was Hornady. Have pretty much added one for every new addition - Now I've got a GOOD library!
Unique and 38/.357 go together like peanut butter and jelly (IMO) and you will find plenty of recipes. As noted earlier, be sure to match your bullets with the data - it's certainly different.
I like the Lyman books for beginners because they have data for numerous different bullets and have excellent illustrations.

WYT-P
Skyhunter
 

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Having data available online is useful. When I was a newbie reloader these resources were not as available. I agree with those who recommended having manuals. Internet down, no play time. It is also good to be able to read the useful information on reloading. You can start plotting out loading strategies. Try different powders and bullet weights until you find what works best for you and the gun. That’s harder to do on the internet unless you know what your doing.
 

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Unique use to be cheap but...dirty. H110 I used for a bit warmer loads and for the .357 loads.
Of course my guns are .357.
U..nique up on pressures though as too much ain't god thang.
 

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I'm new to reloading and have alot of cases of 38 and 357 I have speer 158 grain bullets and unique powder was looking for some reloading data
Pick up the new Sierra manual.

Also, visit the websites of the powders that you think you might want to use.

Never EVER go off of some recipe you get over the internet, or from some person without verifying it with an official reloading manual from Sierra, Lyman, etc., or from the website of the powder manufacturer of the powder you are going to use.

Some well-meaning person can have a brain fart or write a typographical error, and the consequences can be destructive and dangerous.
 

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You should never load anything from the internet (other than using manufacturers websites) without some book data to back it up, unless you have a huge amount of experience. I've been reloading for quite a while (50 something years), and have reloaded well over a million rounds in that time (I had a commercial operation at one time, but still pulled the handle on one of 2 Dillon 1000's for every round!). In all that time I have reloaded exactly 1 load where I started from scratch with virtually no data at all. You should have (at a minimum!) two manuals from which to glean information... and more is better! I use Lyman, Speer, Sierra, and Hornady books, plus online info from Hodgdon, Alliant and Western powder companies to get my reloading data. Even having different manuals can be confusing, since they often list conflicts that might seem extreme, however a close examination of the components used by each will often explain the differences. When you're just starting out, use the exact same components listed in your manuals (this is where having several sources of date can help, if you have certain components that aren't usually listed... the more sources you have, the more likely you are to have one that matches your components). It is also wise to start out with the lower to mid-range power loads, for which the 38/357 is especially forgiving. Once you have gained some experience you can start experimenting with hotter loads and perhaps different types of bullets. In general, with the mid-range loads, you can use different styles of bullets of the same weight and type. *In general and with the same type* - that means cup & core bullets (JHP, JSP, FMJ, etc.) but *not* necessarily with, for example, all copper bullets. Speer even lists seperate (and different) for the Gold Dot bullets from their "regular" jacketed bullets. Care must be taken at all times and when you're working with top end loads, *extreme* care is required!
Cheers,
crkckr
 

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I told a knowledgeable person what my specific goal was and asked if they could recommend a powder to start with. Bought the powder and then went to the powder manufacturers website for load data for the specific bullet I want to shoot. Then you can safely experiment from the low to the high powder measure to see what works best in your gun.
 

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Pick up the new Sierra manual.

Also, visit the websites of the powders that you think you might want to use.

Never EVER go off of some recipe you get over the internet, or from some person without verifying it with an official reloading manual from Sierra, Lyman, etc., or from the website of the powder manufacturer of the powder you are going to use.

Some well-meaning person can have a brain fart or write a typographical error, and the consequences can be destructive and dangerous.
If the OP is reloading Speer bullets wouldn't a Speer Manual be more in line ?
 

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Case question

Hi, All- I'm a newbie to reloading as well, and am starting 100 rounds of .38 Special. Case date indicates a case length of 1.155"... my new Starline brass is shorter than that, about 1.147-1.148"... trimming to length to square up/standardize the brass with a Lee trimmer brings it down to about 1.144".
Should I have trimmed the brass down- since I am assuming that 1.155" length is a maximum case length?? Now that they are trued and matched, I assume all I have to do is check the brass OAL after firing- and just make sure the 1.155" case length isn't exceeded- correct? Thanks!!
Wes
 
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