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The thing about sheep is the brain is actually pretty small and far back in the skull. If you shoot in the “ear hole”, you’re shooting in the hardest bone in the mammalian body (it’s called the petrous bone in humans). It’s actually pretty easy to miss the sheep’s brain shooting from the side.
 

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A muzzle to the forehead would have done the trick with even a 22. As any mobile slaughter guy what they use. Most use a 22mag even for hogs or cattle unless they won't be penned or roped. Then most will switch to a deer caliber scoped center fire.

My wife actually used a 2" 357 on a rooster---he took 2 shots to put him down, but only because she missed with the first. Also forgot hearing protection----hard lesson to learn. :)
 

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Here's what they taught me in vet school about how to humanely dispatch livestock with a firearm:
Draw an imaginary line between one eye and the opposite ear. Repeat with the second eye and its opposite ear. Where the two lines intersect on the forehead is where you put the bullet in order to affect a brain shot. As usual, use enough gun.
 

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The brain of a javelina/peccary is also further back in the skull than many think. A friend once all but emptied his .38 Super before he shot the right place.
 

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I'm going to have to go along with poor shot placement.

I have three generations of experience dispatching live stock (cattle, hogs, horses, no sheep) with 22 longs and long rifles, Grandfather, father, myself.

Both my grandfather and father were tighter than a ducks butt. 38, 357, 30-30 ammo was expensive. You had better kill them with a 22. I was taught where to shoot for a one shot drop and Lord help you if you had to shoot twice.
 

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When I was the plant manager for a packing plant, I had to learn how to do every single job from killing them to selling them, hogs and cattle, that is. The killing job on the kill floor was not something I enjoyed but it was surely a special job. We used a kill gun on the cattle that used .22LR blanks to blow a six inch long 1/2 in diameter rod into the brain of the designated animal. They dropped like a stone when I put the end of the "gun" against their forehead and released the hammer to strike the blanks to drive the piston. the gun itself was about a foot long and 1.5 inches in diameter. Very effective. Sometimes I would use a .22mag blank to do the job on a big bull or huge cow. To kill the pigs, I used an electric "gun" that had a pistol grip connected to 220 volts on the bottom of the grip and that had two stainless steel four inch long 1/2 inch prongs coming from glass insullators. I placed the prongs behind the ears of the pigs/hogs and pulled the trigger and sent 220 volts through their brains and brain stems. It worked so well I could stand a 275 pound hog on its hind legs with one hand. When I stopped shocking them, they lay on their side and kicked as they were technically still alive. I would slip a chain around their hind legs and connect the other end to a vertical conveyor system that lifted them about twenty feet in the air where they then slid via the chain down a transfer bar to the first position where someone cut their throats and bled them out, which was when they were killed. If we had one of those four foot tall at the shouders sows or an even larger boar, then I used a .22LR single shot rifle to dispatch them. One shot through the ear into the brain always did the job. I learned how to do all that in one short morning. We would slaughter 50 of our raised "bacon" hogs (250 to 275 lbs.) every day and twenty head of our feed lot beeves every day. And that did not include all the "custom" beef and hogs we did for individuals who brought them in for slaughter and processing. All that killing will wear on a guy after a while. Luckily I only did it when the regular "kill floor" killer was sick or otherwise absent. He really loved his work. Never did understand that.
 

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Definitely bad shot placement, I've shot sheep, cattle and horses and all with a 22lr.

One shot base of the ear and they stop breathing, go strait and start twitching.
 

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Hmm, this story smells like low tide.

How do you NOT know what your own gun is loaded with, even after checking it to see if it were loaded? You can see from the head stamps what kind of "bullets" are in it without having to take them out.
 

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I think the OP was just trolling...he hasn't posted again .
Made up story ?
Gary
 

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>> Use to use a 22 to kill cows that we were going to butcher. Draw lines from ears to eyes. Shoot them where it crosses.

How important is the bullet type in these situations?
Jody
 

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"Stopping Power" can be had in the use of proper shot placement or suitable application of a high speed train.

Caliber brings little into the equation if one insists upon missing.
 

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The other day I put a half gallon milk jug filled with frozen water out at 100 yards. I shot it with 22, and nothing much happened. I shot it with 9mm, and still nothing. Same with .223.

Hmmm... what to do?

One round of 30-06 blew it to smithereens.
"Ain't many problems a man can't fix, with $600 and a 30-06!" :thumbsup:
 

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Sounds like some lousy shot placement..................
 

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I had a ewe sheep that had problems a few days following giving birth. She was on the ground and couldn't lift her head, more dead than alive. It was a hot day and she was lying in the direct sun. I decided the humane thing would be to put her down. I took my GP100 from where I keep it. I thought a 38 spec. should do the job. The gun was already loaded. It had been awhile since I had shot it. I took careful aim at the base of the skull and fired. Nothing. She didn't even flinch. Her breathing didn't change. I couldn't see an entry wound. No blood. How could I have missed from 3 feet away. I shot again. Same result. The third shot I saw it enter at the center of the base of her skull. About an ounce of blood seeped out. Still there was no reaction or change in her breathing. I had checked to make sure the gun was loaded before shooting it but had not removed a bullet. I assumed they were hand load 38 specials. Perhaps they were anemic. I went to my bullet shop and got a box of 357 mags. When I opened the cylinder it was already loaded with Hornady 158 g 357 hollow-point mags. I returned with my 308 deer rifle. There was no change in the ewe. Her respiration was as before. The 308 finally did the job and killed the poor thing instantly. Is it possible the first two hollow points mushroomed and didn't penetrate her wool and the third just barely penetrated the skin? I didn't check. I was fearful that I had already freaked out the wife who was attached to the ewe and I quickly got rid of the evidence.
This kind of experience is ugly and painful. I've had botched mercy shootings. I'd rather have appendicitis again than endure some of the awful mistakes I've made having to put down animals.


Watched a dog get killed with a pocket pistol. One to the head, two to the neck. Like it was poleaxed. Very weak round.

Lots of people have been executed with small handguns. One guy killed over 7,000 Polish officers, priests and college professors with a Walther 2 in 25 ACP. I don't know if he required a second shot. He killed one every minute a half for ten hours a night. Katyn Forest shootings.

The Nazis used to use Air Rifles on "last leggers". They were worried that the sight of a last legger would freak out the ordinary people being sent to be gassed.

Two prisoners would help the last legger strip down, they would escort the condemned person through a doorway. The SS creature would come out of the corner with an air rifle. One shot to the right spot in the skull while the escorts leaned out of the way. Down went the last legger.

Everyone else will say, I'll say it. No substitute for good shot placement.
 
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