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Your kidding right? No brainer...

At same velocity the 158g bullet will have more recoil than the 125g bullet. At the same velocity, my .45 Colt with a 255g bullet will have way more recoil. A 700g bullet at the same velocity ....
 

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For me , the felt re-coil, is with the 125grn.

I've shot a lot of both (factory loads) in my different 357 .. and the recoil pulse for me, is more sharp and nasty with 125grn. Seems to have more bite.

But I think if you look due to the bullet weight, the velocities on factory ammo are lower on most 158grn rounds. I assume the powder charge is the same.. but I have no real idea..

All I can say, factory rounds.. 158 grn is a less of a snap and nasty feel. Heavier the gun, the less of a difference I fell..

My gp100, really can't tell the difference, but for the bark.
In the S&W K frame, can start to fell the difference.
On my SP101, oh yea.. can shoot 158grns all day, the bark and bite is more noticable with the 125 in the SP101 .

38+Ps in my LCR .... again, really don't want to shoot more than a cylinder or two of 125's.. but 158s, could go an entire box and than decide enough is enough.

In both the 357 and 38+p, it just seems the 125grm rounds are "hotter" than the 158grn rounds.

Can't disagree with the physic rclark is referring to.
But above is what I've notice when trying the different rounds.
 

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The last time .357 Magnum loads were brought up it ended in a "DD"!
Minefield..........;)
Tony

PS 125 is worse than 158 to me?
yea, anything related to a persons "opinion" or "perception", makes for a long thread..

"Recoil", seems from the past discussions, have me agreeing it's "felt recoil", we all discuss... so different experience for different people, and is different based on the gun used too.

I would love to test fire one of those Rhinos on 357 on 4" and snubby .


at least I'm not the only one.. I'm with you on the 125's.
 

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The 125 grain round will usually have more noise and muzzle flash but less actual recoil than a 158 grain. The 158 grain will usually penetrate deeper than a 125 grain.
 

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Why dose it matter which has more recoil? If you cant handle the load of a .357 then shoot 38 spl. Its that simple, the gun will chamber both rounds.
 

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Why dose it matter which has more recoil? If you cant handle the load of a .357 then shoot 38 spl. Its that simple, the gun will chamber both rounds.
I believe the OP's post was ~ within the 357 family.... ......
asking fellow members opinion ...
of 125 vs 357 ..

to me, seems like a nice discussion along with the past perceived recoil discussions...


getting out of the caliber, 45acp is a nice one to talk about in that respect...
I love the push and torque feeling of it's recoil.. nothing nasty there, just power. but that's getting a bit off topic.
 

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I believe the OP's post was ~ within the 357 family.... ......
asking fellow members opinion ...
of 125 vs 357 ..

to me, seems like a nice discussion along with the past perceived recoil discussions...


getting out of the caliber, 45acp is a nice one to talk about in that respect...
I love the push and torque feeling of it's recoil.. nothing nasty there, just power. but that's getting a bit off topic.
Those of us that own .357's are well aware of it's dual cartridge capabilities. I shot the 125's and then the 158's, my S&W 19-5 4" heats up bad on the 125's but not the 158's, when shooting the 158's it didn't appear to have as much recoil. I may be wrong and this is where Iowegan could set us straight? It's a matter of opinion and a friendly discussion so far?
Tony
PS .45 1911 seems less than the 125's?
 

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You have to compare 'apples' to 'apples' ... velocity being the common denominator. Sure you can crank up 125s to 2000fps and get some heavy recoil and blast. While the recoil of a 158g moving 800fps seems light.... But compare at the same velocity? With the 158g moving at 2000fps? Guess who wins? Easy to test if you reload :) .

Here ya go, same powder, same primer (a couple of tests I've ran over my chrono):

.357 cartridge

4.5g Red Dot under 125g TC 1020fps
5.0g Red Dot under 158g SWC 1019fps
 

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Even when dealing with factory ammo, not all 125 grain loads are loaded the same, any more than all 158 grain factory loads are loaded the same. I have noticed a difference in muzzle blast and felt recoil with the same bullet weight from one brand/load to the next in both my 357 and my 45 autos.

You can quote all the math you want, but felt recoil is such a personal thing, one shooter to the next, that the only way to know for sure is to shoot and see for yourself, but, heck, that's half the fun.
 

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I hear ya on the numbers, but the physics behind pushing a lighter projectile out (compared to a heavier one) / acceleration, torque and such ... seems to provide a different feel and experience (felt recoil) to the shooter, depending on the handgun.

lighter = faster acceleration, different feel? / different implus , and out of the barrel quicker = more flash / bang for same charge.

I 100% agree, same fps, heavier bullet / more mass = more energy.

I also think we're talking OEM / boxed / bought ammo.

to be honest... I haven't gone back and looked at the numbers from the OEMS of the box stuff I have on 125 and 158.
All premium stuff, not light target loads or anything. All sold for hunting or SD.

So if the mfg'ers are using the same primer / powder, but just stuffing a heavier bullet on top... = slower FPS , less experience recoil as well. Which would make sense.

I know I've felt it between 125's and 158's from MagTech..
Should have their info on line...

Look at one distributor...

(I've had SJHP 125's and SJSP 158's , so looking for apples and apples from the one OEM.. seems the SJSP 158's are the same as the FMJFlat 158's)


Details

.357 Mag 158 SJSP Flat
Additional Information
Manufacturer - Magtech
Condition - New
Ammo Caliber - 357 Magnum Ammo
Bullet Weight - 158 Grain
Bullet Type - Semi Jacket Soft Point (SJSP) Flat
Ammo Casing - Boxer-primed brass
Primer Type - Boxer
Cost Per Round - 0.45¢ per round
Muzzle Velocity (fps) - 1235
Muzzle Entergy (ft lbs) - 535
A1 Ammo Item - 357A
VS

357 Mag 158 FMJ Flat
Additional Information
Manufacturer - Magtech
Condition - New
Ammo Caliber - 357 Magnum Ammo
Bullet Weight - 158 Grain
Bullet Type - Full Metal Jacket (FMJ) Flat
Ammo Casing - Boxer-primed brass
Primer Type - Boxer
Cost Per Round - 0.49¢ per round
Muzzle Velocity (fps) - 1235
Muzzle Entergy (ft lbs) - 535
A1 Ammo Item - 357D

VS

Details

.357 Mag 125 FMJ Flat
Additional Information
Manufacturer - Magtech
Condition - New
Ammo Caliber - 357 Magnum Ammo
Bullet Weight - 125 Grain
Bullet Type - Full Metal Jacket (FMJ) Flat
Ammo Casing - Boxer-primed brass
Primer Type - Boxer
Cost Per Round - 0.50¢ per round
Muzzle Velocity (fps) - 1405
Muzzle Entergy (ft lbs) - 548
A1 Ammo Item - 357Q
 

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Even when dealing with factory ammo, not all 125 grain loads are loaded the same, any more than all 158 grain factory loads are loaded the same. I have noticed a difference in muzzle blast and felt recoil with the same bullet weight from one brand/load to the next in both my 357 and my 45 autos.

You can quote all the math you want, but felt recoil is such a personal thing, one shooter to the next, that the only way to know for sure is to shoot and see for yourself, but, heck, that's half the fun.

Agreed, I've noticed differences... also seems more 125's are loaded hotter than 158's.

From discussions on the S&W forum (what rubbed off onto me from them), related to shooting apart K frames and damaging forcing cones...when the K frames were originally designed SD "hot" 125grn loads weren't around... and not a problem to the K frames... 158's were the common carry load and K frames and forcing cones weren't known to be "problematic" or "not robust" , till the 125 grn "hot" SD rounds made their way onto the market.

The flash , the flame cutting, acceleration of the light projectile jumping the gap and forcing itself into the cone, causes these problems with the K frame.

All of this I can see leading to a felt / perceived different in recoil.

In my GP100, but for the blast, I don't think I could tell the difference, but as I move to a lighter revolver, the differences between rounds becomes more evident to me.
 

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Interestingly enough, My experience was with the Magtechs in both 125 and 158 grs.? I tried 125gr. Hydra Shoks and they were really flash/bang? It says low recoil on the box (but not)? They got the barrel super hot also! Your right on, my S&W model 19-5 is a K-frame, forcing cone crack possibility is all over with 125gr.. I don't reload so I'm out of the loop on that.
Tony
PS I do love that gun though!!:D
 

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Why dose it matter which has more recoil? If you cant handle the load of a .357 then shoot 38 spl. Its that simple, the gun will chamber both rounds.
If your'e going to get on someone for asking a question, check your spelling.:)
 

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Interestingly enough, My experience was with the Magtechs in both 125 and 158 grs.? I tried 125gr. Hydra Shoks and they were really flash/bang? It says low recoil on the box (but not)? They got the barrel super hot also! Your right on, my S&W model 19-5 is a K-frame, forcing cone crack possibility is all over with 125gr.. I don't reload so I'm out of the loop on that.
Tony
PS I do love that gun though!!:D

Me too, I don't reload, and look for inexpensive, but good ammo.
I've had GREAT experience with the MagTechs... and keep shooting them.

yea, love the K frames.

When I had mine rebuilt and restored by S&W, they too went thru and explained the forcing cone issue with me. VERY fortunately my 19-2 went thru two LE carry careers , and no 125 S&W expected. Just good old 357 or 38+Ps, based on the wear.

S&W said my forcing cone had some erosion, they just had to clean up the forcing cone. Very little flame cutting. Barrel in great shape. Frame good, but needed a lot of buffing out.
The bores in the cylinder , most where over sized and out of spec, and crane not happy, and lock work not soo happy.
So you can shoot out a K frame.

I stopped shooting it when I found it was spitting lead from the cylinder to cone gap, and finally sent it into S&W for the repair/resto.


When I owned it, before sending it to S&W, I put some, maybe a box of 125 SD ammo thru it.. now I wont at all. Too much of a GEM for me. My Rugers are my shooters, the 19-2 comes out rarely and I wont carry her.
It was my 1st handgun when I got my permit, got it from my friend the 2nd LEO to have owned it/carried it.
 

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My .357 was made 11/83. Went into a safe because of a death (not from the gun) in '90, and I got it right out of the guy's safe after sitting for 22 years. Took it to three LGS and all said it hardly ever been fired and doesn't have even one mark on it! I got lucky and am really enjoying it. I shoot Magtech .38's (158gr.) more than the .357's.
Tony

 

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As everyone can see, there is quite a difference in opinion and here's why:

There are two types of recoil ... "text book" and "felt". You can easily compute text book recoil by multiplying the bullet weight (in pounds) by the velocity (in fps) then dividing the result by the weight of the gun (in pounds). Examples: a 357 Mag with a 125 gr bullet @ 1450 fps, fired from a GP-100 weighing 40 oz (2.5 lb). 125/7000=.0178 lbs bullet weight. .0178x1450=25.89, 25.89/2.5=10.35 lb recoil thrust/second. A 158 gr bullet @ 1235 fps would have 11.15 lb of thrust/second from the same GP-100.

"Text book" recoil doesn't take one important factor into consideration ..... powder burn rate and that's because it takes way less than a second to happen. Typically, faster burn rate powders are used with lighter bullets. Although the "text book" recoil would be the same with any powder, "felt" recoil is going to feel much sharper with faster burning powder because recoil happens faster. Conversely, a cartridge loaded with slower burning powder will spread recoil time out longer and make felt recoil less. Of course there are other issues to consider such as the grip angle, shooter's grip strength, barrel length, etc. If you fired the same gun with the two different bullet weights, it would be a fair comparison, however if you changed brands of cartridges or used a different gun, felt recoil could actually reverse.

So in conclusion, you can't measure felt recoil ... the only way to compare two different cartridges is to shoot them in your gun and judge for yourself.
 
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