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Having a rough time trying to seat 260 Accubond bullets to the cannelure. Keeps folding in the neck. Any ideas?
 

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375 - sorry I'm not familiar with that caliber.
Is this a rifle caliber?

If so, you need to chamfer the edge of the case.
This is why I like boat tail bullets.
 

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Having a rough time trying to seat 260 Accubond bullets to the cannelure. Keeps folding in the neck. Any ideas?
Try seating the bullet first then crimp it in. Don't try & do both at the same time. And plus it sounds like your trying to put way to heavy of a crimp on it. And make sure your brass is trimmed to the same length.
 

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I'm not that familiar with 375, only that its made for big dangerous game such as water buffalo, Alaskan brown bear etc. Theres nothing in Texas that warrants a 375 so you won't find many of them around here.
 

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Yea it's one of those big medicine cartridges. Yea you don't need that much gun for Texas whitetail or javelin. But it's really a prety versatile flat shooting cartridge. And it's fun to shoot.
 

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My first thought is cases that might be too long...that will wreck the neck when trying to crimp.
 

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375 - sorry I'm not familiar with that caliber.
Is this a rifle caliber?

If so, you need to chamfer the edge of the case.
This is why I like boat tail bullets.
I looked on Nosler's website & it is a boat-tailed bullet. A big one:eek::eek:
 

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I would say the seating die is adjusted improperly,trying to crimp the mouth before the bullet is fully seated. I don't believe the cartridge needs to be crimped but perhaps with the substantial recoil it does. I suggest you look up the directions for your seating die adjustment . Really late to the party!
 

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As Cheap870 mentioned, you may want to seat the bullet and crimp in separate steps. There are several different crimp dies available. I like the Lee Factory Crimp Die for mt rifle ammo. It does a nice job and is reasonably priced.

Never mind... I just noticed this post is from 2012. I'm sure he's figured it out by now. LOL
 

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Good advice - seat them first then crimp them. I would hope that I should have thought of that,

I have some 260 grain .375 Accubonds , they are boat tails and have a cannelure. A good amount of neck tension combined with a crimp is essential; this will prevent the loaded rounds after slamming into the front of the magazine box being driven back into the case compressing the powder and possibly boosting pressures.

The nice hard white tip on the Accubond resists deformation from being slammed into the front of the magazine box. Hornady makes their .375 bullets with a tip that resists slamming - they might call it recoil protected or something like that.

An olde post but a good one (somebody must have dredged it up) for those with .375 H&H's and .375 Rugers and such. They shoot good with lots of H4350 and the 270 grain Hornady - a flat base bullet that can be easily seated first then crimped second. Not very much use for me but I did shoot a rock chuck (yellow bellied marmot or western variety of the eastern ground hog) with mine (.375-.338) - fun to shoot. Best use apparently is on big beasts like bears.
 
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