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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to get some ammo for my newly acquired (from my father-in-law) 44 Carbine Ser. #71342
I looked on-line for ammo and yes, like all the other pistol ammo is quite scarce, but I also found many of the ammo reviews out there denote issues with some target ammo not "cycling through" well in the Ruger Carbines and Deerfiels. I'm guessing the gr must be sensitive and need a certain amount of gas to cycle the round properly. I definitely don't want to use inferior ammo as it will not only be hard to find, but pricy as hell right now. Just wondering what the experts have to say about the ammo issues with these Carbines.
 

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I use decent 44mag ammo, not the lighter loads. Haven’t really had any issues with mine. Reloads include mid to upper load data for 240gr bullets using H110, W296, 2400.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. Pretend I am an idiot (which I'll gladly admit in this arena) and tell me what the "H110, W296, and 2400 means?

I'm no expert in these guns (just downloaded the manual) and I have a gunsmith that lives near me that I know that is going to give the gun a once-over.
 

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Thanks for the reply. Pretend I am an idiot (which I'll gladly admit in this arena) and tell me what the "H110, W296, and 2400 means?

I'm no expert in these guns (just downloaded the manual) and I have a gunsmith that lives near me that I know that is going to give the gun a once-over.
H110, W296, 2400 are all slower burn rate pistol powders suited for magnum caliber handguns to obtain higher velocities. they are also suitable for some rifle caliber cartridges. If you reload the powder info is useful. Otherwise you just have commercially available ammo and whatever powder they use.

Most any commercially available ammo should be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
H110, W296, 2400 are all slower burn rate pistol powders suited for magnum caliber handguns to obtain higher velocities. they are also suitable for some rifle caliber cartridges. If you reload the powder info is useful. Otherwise you just have commercially available ammo and whatever powder they use. Most any commercially available ammo should be fine.
Thanks, I like learning and I definitely am smarter for reading your reply. So the real thing I should look for the is 240 grain and no other detail really matters for these carbines.
 

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I have one, love it. As the owners manual says, don't use lead bullets, they will plug the gas system. I like the Leverevolution for hunting.
 

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H110, W296, 2400 are all slower burn rate pistol powders suited for magnum caliber handguns to obtain higher velocities. they are also suitable for some rifle caliber cartridges. If you reload the powder info is useful. Otherwise you just have commercially available ammo and whatever powder they use.

Most any commercially available ammo should be fine.
You don't want to use commercial downloaded 'cowboy' loads.
Most 'Full Power' 44 Magnum loads will work well.
Look for ratings of ~1100-1300 fps or better.
 

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I have never had any problems with ANY commercial .44 magnum in my .44 Carbine.
Most cycling problems with the Ruger .44 Magnum Carbine are probably related to fouling of the gas ports and do not buy cowboy loads. (leverevolution which is designed for lever guns.)

My go to ammo before I started reloading was plain Winchester 240gr.
Your rifle may or may not stabilize the heavier 300gr ammo.

Which rifle do you have?
Does it have a tube magazine or a rotary magazine?

I have a 1963 .44 carbine and its a tack driver within 100yds.
 
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You can shoot Leverevolution ammo in your 44 Mag carbine. Its definitely NOT loaded to cowboy levels and is meant for hunting or self-defense applications. I wouldn't leave that ammo loaded in the 44 Mag Carbine tube mag for long periods of time. The Leverevolution poly-style tipped bullets will deform if stacked end to end in the mag.
 

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Loved those early 44 magnum carbines. Best brush country and thick woods deer gun. I too heard the 240 grain ammo functions best. Tough to find a good used one now.
 

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As the others have said, full power 240 gr jacketed bullet ammo is the way to go (JHP or JSP).
 

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To get your foot in the door, try Winchester’s .44 Magnum carbine load. It’s 240 grains, a hollow point and full power. I like it so well I prefer it to my handloads. It is a powerhouse on deer. Just be aware, these are short range rifles best used at 100 yards and under. Preferably under.

Good luck with finding ammo.
 

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Good luck with finding ammo.
That's the real trick, isn't it? :confused:

My carbine loves the Winchester 240gr, unfortunately, nowhere around me (or online) has had it in a while.

Mine really loves the 240gr Hornady XTP's loaded pretty close to max with H-110.
 

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I'm looking to get some ammo for my newly acquired (from my father-in-law) 44 Carbine Ser. #71342
I looked on-line for ammo and yes, like all the other pistol ammo is quite scarce, but I also found many of the ammo reviews out there denote issues with some target ammo not "cycling through" well in the Ruger Carbines and Deerfiels. I'm guessing the gr must be sensitive and need a certain amount of gas to cycle the round properly. I definitely don't want to use inferior ammo as it will not only be hard to find, but pricy as hell right now. Just wondering what the experts have to say about the ammo issues with these Carbines.
Three suggestions, get a book on reloading, buy reloading equipment, start reloading. You're gonna cry when you finally find some + see the register receipt. Oh, and bend over + pu all spent brass. That's 4 ain't it? :unsure:
 

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Purchased my .44 Carbine in 1971 for $75 with a scope. Still my favorite gun to shoot!

Somewhere along the line I was told to never use round nose ammo in it. Reason was supposedly it's possible for a round nose in a tube magazine to ignite the round in front of it from the recoil. Don't know if it's true or not but I have always gone with either hollow point of flat nose. And never feed it a .44 Special. It simply does not like to cycle off those.
 

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That's the real trick, isn't it? :confused:

My carbine loves the Winchester 240gr, unfortunately, nowhere around me (or online) has had it in a while.

Mine really loves the 240gr Hornady XTP's loaded pretty close to max with H-110.
I ended up doing the same thing. My handload is the same one you described. I don’t doubt it will work, I’ve just had so much success with the Winchester hollow-point it became my go to load of choice. Finding it is the challange.

Several decades ago a fellow wrote to a gun magazine about the Ruger .44 carbine. I think it was the American Rifleman. He said the little gun’s ballistics didn’t seem impressive , but it was unfailing death on deer. The published answer to his inquiry was kind if wordy and I don’t recall all of it. One line I do remember was “These guns kill all out if proportion to their paper ballistics.” As near as I can tell, those guys were both right. The .44 carbine is what made me a Ruger fan.

Mine has a Mannlicher style stock and I put a quality shotgun scope on it. I think it is a 1x4 with a heavy duplex reticle. I love it for short range heavy cover.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have never had any problems with ANY commercial .44 magnum in my .44 Carbine.
Most cycling problems with the Ruger .44 Magnum Carbine are probably related to fouling of the gas ports and do not buy cowboy loads. (leverevolution which is designed for lever guns.)

My go to ammo before I started reloading was plain Winchester 240gr.
Your rifle may or may not stabilize the heavier 300gr ammo.

Which rifle do you have?
Does it have a tube magazine or a rotary magazine?

I have a 1963 .44 carbine and its a tack driver within 100yds.
When I received the Carbine, I put the Serial Number in the Ruger Website to identify it (#71342), but it showed "no matching results." After an email I thought it took a mag, but it is definitely a tube magazine Carbine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Three suggestions, get a book on reloading, buy reloading equipment, start reloading. You're gonna cry when you finally find some + see the register receipt. Oh, and bend over + pu all spent brass. That's 4 ain't it? :unsure:
Funny... costs are ridiculous right now to be sure. However, if I were to reload, I still have to purchase the brass first anyway, 'eh?
 

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Funny... costs are ridiculous right now to be sure. However, if I were to reload, I still have to purchase the brass first anyway, 'eh?
You can buy used brass cheaper....well relatively cheaper.

Save all your brass even if you don’t reload. You may be able to use it later if you start reloading or be able to trade it for components down the road.
 
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