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I've always used cannelure bullets for heavy recoil guns to set the crimp but is it possible to load a bullet without a cannelure and still be confident that nothing is going to move? I load 240gn XTP with 296, Unique, 2400, H110 etc. around 15-1600 fps. shooting a Redhawk 5.5 barrel and Henry rifle.
 

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Ruger .44 Carbine, Security-Six, Service-Six, Mini-14, .30 Carbine Blackhawk
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I think it is possible.
I load .44mag for my Ruger .44 carbine with a very light crimp, mostly just removing the flare and I have never experienced any movement.
 
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That Henry has a different type of magazine than a Ruger carbine. I recommend a good crimp into the cannelure.
Aren’t they both tube magazines?
 

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I've always used cannelure bullets for heavy recoil guns to set the crimp but is it possible to load a bullet without a cannelure and still be confident that nothing is going to move? I load 240gn XTP with 296, Unique, 2400, H110 etc. around 15-1600 fps. shooting a Redhawk 5.5 barrel and Henry rifle.
You made me go check, all of my .44 and .45 XTPs have a canelure but that was not your actual question,

There probably is not enough powder in those loads to fill the case to the bottom of the bullet. Even then the powder could compress and allow the bullet to be set deeper into the brass while in the tubular magazine.
With the revolver you only need to be concerned with the bullet 'jumping crimp', moving forward and tying up the cylinder. Having the bullet telescope back into the brass could cause feeding problems (at the least) and over-pressure problems which are more dangerous.
The test for jumping crimp is to shoot several cylinders through the revolver leaving one (the same one) round unfired and check to see if the bullet is creeping out.

The test for the bullet creeping back into the case would be similar but not quite as easily done. Load the magazine fully and fire several rounds. Unload the rifle and check to see if any of the unfired rounds have shortened. If none have load it back up with the same round first into the magazine and repeat the process, perhaps several times to be sure. In recoil the weight of all the rounds in the magazine is pushing forward on that first round so, all rounds being equal, it should be the one to show shortening if any is occurring but I would still want to check several.
You may not need to have a canelure on the bullets but you will want a reasonable solid crimp. For my .45 Colt Trapper I like the Lee Collet Style Crimp Die (NOT to be confused with the Carbide Factory Crimp Die). The Collet Style Crimp Die has a segmented, collet 'crimp' which applies the crimp while pressing inward from the sides. It will crimp things like plated bullets which generally don't have canelures, just don't crimp so hard that you 'break' the plating.

Bruce
 

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Depends on bullet but for 44 mag in revolver I prefer a cannelure and heavy crimp for full power loads, especially with H110 or W296. I have had some bullets that did not have a cannelure jump the crimp. I would say experiment with bullets and crimp and see what works.
 

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I have not had any issues with bullets jumping crimp, with or without cannelure. I mainly load 240 grain Keith style SWC from Missouri Bullets, but I did load a box of Berry's 220 grain
plated flat point without a cannelure, about 1200 FPS with HP-38, and never noticed any problems. Just a grain of anecdotal evidence from a wild eyed Southern boy.
 

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Personally why bother. The proper cannelure bullets are readily available whether lead (like I use), coated, or jacketed.
 
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Sounds like you're referring to the Collet Crimp Die, FireEscape. Yes?
You may not need to have a canelure on the bullets but you will want a reasonable solid crimp. For my .45 Colt Trapper I like the Lee Factory Crimp Die (NOT to be confused with the Carbide Factory Crimp Die). The Factory Crimp Die has a segmented, collet 'crimp' which applies the crimp while pressing inward from the sides. It will crimp things like plated bullets which generally don't have canelures, just don't crimp so hard that you 'break' the plating.
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Crimp or no crimp all depends, in my experience, on the load and type of bullet you're using. I've used fairly light (median) loads with lead & coated bullets in .38, .357 and .44 mag with just a taper crimp for years without problems. If you can't find a taper crimp in your caliber, you can simply use a size die raised so that it puts about a 1/16" or so taper crimp on the case mouth (I use the same method to taper crimp .223 ammo just to avoid using the cannelure).

If you are using a heavy load, with any powder but especially with 296 or H110, using a roll crimp for revolvers is necessary for consistency of ignition and to prevent bullet creep. A taper crimp might work for once around the cylinder but if #6 wasn't shot and was again loaded as #6, creep (thus locking the cylinder up) is possible! Plus you will not have the consistency of ignition needed for best accuracy.
Cheers,
crkckr
 

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Sounds like you're referring to the Collet Crimp Die, FireEscape. Yes?

View attachment 181537

YES, Thank you!
For some reason the ones that I have for my lever guns are "Factory Crimp Dies" but the ones for handguns are "Collet Style Crimp Dies", I never caught on to my calling the handgun ones by the wrong name before.
They only make them for the longer of the straight wall handgun rounds (and lots of bottleneck cartridges but those are "Factory Crimp"), I do not know if the design would not work on shorter brass or if they don't think there would be enough demand.
I have them for .45 Colt, .44 Magnum and .41 Magnum. Can't recall if I have tried the .44 Mag one on .44Special but the .41 Mag does NOT work on .41 Special.

Bruce
 

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.22 Single Six and Ten, three Wranglers, 2 44 Vaqueros, MkII, 10-22, 22 Charger, 77-357, GP100s.
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I use the Lee factory crimp dies for all my .44spl loads, usually Skeeter loads for the Keith bullets, mostly for my 44 Vaqueros. Also the Keith style .357's in my .38spl's, with Skeeter loads, for my GP100, and a couple of S&W's. Tried the roll crimps on both cast 44's and 38's, and found them to be inconsistent. Found that the smooth crimp into the cannelure worked. Especially after I collected a lot of Berrys' 44 and 357 plated bullets, with no cannelures. Get very similar results from them as the cast bullet loads, as long as all are crimped the same.
 
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