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I bought this pistol for deer hunting and I thought the 2x Leupold scope would be fine but what I discovered was the scope makes it hard to locate the target and also seems to make it look smaller. I can hit a 2" bulls eye @ 50 yards that's about my limit with this scope (I'd like to get out to 100 yards at least)
Have any of you ever tried a holographic sight on a pistol like this one?
Or what kind of scope would you recommend?
THX,
Anahuac1
 

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A non-magnifying sight won't benefit you as much for longer range shooting as a magnifying scope.

Picking up targets in pistol scopes is difficult at first - it takes practice. Practicing your grip is critical, as your grip dictates your eye-to-optic alignment. Then, keeping both eyes open as you level the revolver will help you co-witness the reticle and scope image with the open field view of your other eye - your brain will automatically superimpose the images together.

However, when using magnifying optics, anything over about 4x will tend to make shooters feel as though they're shaking terribly, which makes a lot of shooters uncomfortable. You just need to remember, you're not shaking any more than you were with a 2x zoom, you're only more able to notice the bobbles.

A Primos Trigger Stick with a Bog-Pod PSR topper makes a FANTASTIC revolver field rest. I shoot nearly as well on that set up as I do from a bench and front rest. The Bog-Pod Tac-3S and HD3 are a bit more solid than the Trigger Stik, since the Trigger Stik has a little bit of slop in the hand grip tenon, but it's very manageable, and the speed of adjustment is a huge advantage for hunters.

The Leupold VX-3 2.5-8x is a fantastic scope, albeit pricey. The Bushnell Elite 2-6x is a great scope as well, and the Simmons Pro-Hunter 2-6x is a great budget friendly option. Comparing these 3, you do get what you pay for at each level.

I have used red-dots/holographics on revolvers for many years, personally preferring the Ultradot Match Dot, Burris FastFire, and Trijicon RMR, in no particular order. For defensive revolvers, I prefer the RMR, for hunting, the FastFire, for targets, I like the MatchDot. My favorite mounting strategy for the microdot sights is the JP Rifle JPoint mount that replaces the rear sight, using the appropriate mounting adapter plate (JP makes a JP to burris/docter adapter, Arredondo makes a JP to RMR adapter).

Red dots are much more precise than the factory sights - Ruger front sights typically cover 15MOA when held at arms length - but they're no where near as precise as a magnified telescopic sight with 1/4MOA reticle wires.

BUT, again - it does take a lot of practice to get used to shooting a "high" magnification scoped revolver.
 

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Anahuac1;1874658 Have any of you ever tried a holographic sight on a pistol like this one? Or what kind of scope would you recommend? THX said:
I have a Millet 3 moa red dot scope on my 6 1/2" Super Black hawk and it is ok for 100 yards. If you keep both eyes open, it appears that you see the dot with both eyes, and it helps with depth perception. There is only one reference point and there is no parallax. Also, it is much lighter than a scope........robin ;)
 

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since they've started offering them, all of my newer scopes on my rifles are either mil-spec, or BDC.

I have a mil-spec scope made by center point on my 30-06.

I have a BDC scope by nikon on my 5.56

I would like to have a holographic or reflex sight on my .44 magnum, but I can see just as far with open sights, as I can with a red dot or any configuration of multi reticle dots.

I've been looking for a while for a scope, and nikon is now offering the nikon force xr eer pistol scope with bdc reticle. I like the bdc feature, its very similar to a mil-dot. the further the target is away, if youre using a range finder, you can compensate, instead of doing a holdover, by using the lower marks of the reticle.

if you have a crossbow you know what I mean. for a 50 yard shot, you use the lowest cross hair.

here is a video from nikon. forward to 9:20 for the pistol scope. shooting a 30-06 thompson contender!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBrdee9SCik
 

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Coyote special scope .223

This scope is caliber specific for the .223, but just to give you a idea of the BDC reticle by Nikon, here is a photo from the box.
 

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since they've started offering them, all of my newer scopes on my rifles are either mil-spec, or BDC.
Mil-Dot, not mil-spec...

I would like to have a holographic or reflex sight on my .44 magnum, but I can see just as far with open sights, as I can with a red dot or any configuration of multi reticle dots.
Yet again, you're missing critical experience and failing to see the real performance difference, and passing on bad advice.

Sure - your naked eye can only see so far, but your iron-sights on your 44mag Redhawk cover about 15MOA. A dot reticle sight can be had as fine as 2MOA. There's a HUGE difference in precision potential between a 15MOA open iron sight and a 2-4MOA red dot reticle.

Similarly, open iron sights have a visible void on either side of the front sight blade as viewed in your sight picture - try as you might, you'll never be perfect at aligning the sights the same way for every shot, especially in rapid fire courses. Red Dot sights do not have this weakness. If the dot is near the center 50% of the pane, it's aligned perfectly, every time.

I've been looking for a while for a scope, and nikon is now offering the nikon force xr eer pistol scope with bdc reticle. I like the bdc feature, its very similar to a mil-dot. the further the target is away, if youre using a range finder, you can compensate, instead of doing a holdover, by using the lower marks of the reticle.
BDC's are essentially useless, especially the Nikon open circle BDC reticle, and they give hunters a false sense of confidence. Shooters cannot focus on the RANGE of their target without understanding the trajectory of their bullets. BDC reticles let inexperienced shooters think they can cheat their way into long range shooting, but they focus on the RANGE, rather than the actual DROP. But when any little variable changes, the range changes, and the shooter is now forced to re-run the calculator to know where their dots are ranged, and have to use confusing numbers to estimate the hold between dots...

There is only ONE set of environmental conditions and ONE load combination that will actually hit those marks as designed. To compensate, Nikon gives away their SpotOn calculator for free, but unless you run the numbers for every environmental condition, have a laser rangefinder, and compensate for the disparity between what SpotOn says the dots represent vs. where the game is standing, it's absolutely useless.

As an example: Entering some of my own data into SpotON for a known load:

Crosshairs = 175 yrd zero
First Dot = 256 yrds
Second Dot = 334yrds
Third Dot = 397yrds
Fourth Dot = 478yrds
Low Wire =542yrds

Most hunting happens 0-200yrds - which is within point blank range for my 175yrd zero. No holdover whatsoever and the deer will die.

But say a deer walks out at 285yrds? I have a gaping hole at 256yrds and a gaping hole at 334yrds... Where does 285 really fall? I still have to hold over, and that's some arbitrary math to compare.

But wait - I took that rifle coyote hunting in colorado last winter - instead of being a 1225ft elevation and 35degrees, I was at 6500ft and 0deg...

Crosshair = 175yrds
First Dot = 267yrds
Second = 359yrds
Third = 435yrds
Fourth = 535
Wire = 617

Or maybe I take that scope off of my 223 and put it on my 300wsm...

Crosshair = 175yrd zero
First Dot = 291
Second = 417
Third = 531
Fourth = 696
Wire = 842yrds

For different cartridges and different environmental conditions, the distance assigned to each dot is inconsistent, but those shooters think they can cheat their way out of doing the math and understanding the drop on their cartridge. The increments on the reticle are inconsistent, so for every change you make for temperature, pressure, elevation, or bullet type, or velocity, you have to figure out completely new spans and run completely different mathematics. It's no easier to use a BDC than a standard ranging/compensating reticle, and in many ways, it's more difficult.

Ranging and holdover reticles should have consistent increments on the reticle, and the shooter needs to understand what those increments mean in terms of bullet DROP, not try to think about long range shooting in terms of projected range.

As seen above - that first dot might be 40yrds different from one rifle to the next. The last dot might vary by over 200yrds. In a Mil-Dot reticle, being used the proper way - I know that there will be 1MIL drop difference between every dot, no matter what cartridge I'm shooting. So I can couple that understanding with real world DOPE data (google it, learn something) to know that in colorado, my load drops a known amount less than here at home.

Don't be mistaken and lump the Nikon BDC reticle in with the responsible use of a Mil-DOT reticle. There is no cheating your way into long range shooting - there's no other way than to understand your trajectory and how environmental conditions come into play.
 

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I mount a scope on my RedHawk Hunter for shooting at the range, and remove it when deer hunting, using the open sights. But then I mostly now hunt and short range is what I'm used to.
 

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crossbow

Mil-Dot, not mil-spec...



Yet again, you're missing critical experience and failing to see the real performance difference, and passing on bad advice.

I have to disagree with you on that note. If drop dot scopes were inaccurate, they wouldn't put them on military rifles. not only that on hunting rifles. not only that on crossbows. I had a crossbow sighted in at 50 yards, using the lowest dot, and when the arrow started to drop, thats when it hit the bullseye. any higher on the "drop point scope" the arrow would fall short of the target. anyways.......

that being said, I've never had to use a drop dot scope where I am, because all my shots are 100 yards and under. I dont know alot of places where one would need one. unless you had a crossbow or something. on a sidenote, if you wanted to shoot out further than 50 yards you can get a HHA Optimizer Speed Dial, which will let you shoot out to 80 yards. possibly further.

if you were really good you wouldnt need such scopes, you could just hold you're rifle over the target and shoot. depending on how far the target was away. I'm not a math expert so dont quote me on that.

but if you follow the directions with the BDC scope, it should put you at where you want to be,

the one I have is caliber specific so you wouldnt want it on any other caliber rifle.

I dont have a range finder, I dont think I would ever need one.

My uncle shot tons of deer with open sights, from far distances.

its all in how you perceive. and the ammo you use. some ammo travels faster.

I guess if you wanted to see how accurate a BDC would be, you would have to range out a target at the BDCs max, and sight in/adjust accordingly, just like any other scope you've sighted in. maybe set up some targets in between 200 and 300 yards, and see which dot does it for you, or where your holdover would be.

you definitely wouldn't want to go on a hunt if you knew your rifle wasn't sighted in. you'd miss.
 

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it seems the scope the OP has, isn't really magnified, kind of like looking through a scope through the opposite end.

I've looked at the cost differences, I contacted EO-tech, they couldn't recommend a holographic scope for a pistol. they don't offer one.

I contacted Trijicon, they recommended a scope. to be exact they recommended RM08G: Trijicon RMR® Dual-Illuminated Sight - 12.9 MOA Green Triangle. they also gave me a link to where to find a mount.

I would have to find someway to take that scope and put it on a weaver mount. perfect if you have a semi-auto handgun.

Red Dot Mounts: Trijicon RMR, DeltaPoint, FastFire, Vortex

I would almost spend about the same amount on a Red-dot, as a magnified scope, but honestly, I have never been a fan of Red-dot scopes, except if the red dot happens to be on a shotgun.

I would rather have a scope over a red dot. even iron sights.

I have a rifle scope on my mark II ruger. it does alright. It's a 9x tasco. The scope is on a see through mount so I can use the iron sights too.
 

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You realize that the RMR RM08g is not a scope, right? You reference trijicon's recommendation - a red dot sight - then say you don't recommend a red dot sight....

If you haven't used it, or done it, your input isn't helping, and can be misleading.
 

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I use the exact same setup, Redhawk 44 Mag, Leuopold 2x pistol scope. I like the combo, any pistol scope takes getting used to, lots of practice. Took a deer at 85 yrds from my blind, used window sill as rest. When still hunting, I use a shooting stick to steady. The key is the eye / scope alignment.
 

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red dot

You realize that the RMR RM08g is not a scope, right? You reference trijicon's recommendation - a red dot sight - then say you don't recommend a red dot sight....

If you haven't used it, or done it, your input isn't helping, and can be misleading.
no, I have a red dot but its on a shotgun.

I've done some research, and contacted both companies, but decided against a red dot. every time I compare the two, magnified scope, or red dot, magnified scope always wins.

red dot vs iron sights. iron sights win. at least for me anyways.

this is the scope Trijicon would recommend for a pistol, but I think you would have a hard time finding a weaver mount for it, but I could be wrong. I just gave up looking for a mount on google.

https://www.trijicon.com/na_en/products/product3.php?pid=RM08G

"The RM08 is a battery free sight, featuring Trijicon fiber optics and tritium. The new Trijicon RMR is tougher than any alternative and suitable for military, law enforcement and hunting applications."

retail: "577.00"

I just cannot bring myself to buy a red dot, or holographic sight, when I can see just as far with iron sights.

I know what a red dot sight will do, thats why I have it mounted on my shotgun, haha. pretty much just for looks, because I have the red dot mounted on a see through mount, on the shotgun also.
 

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I had Leupold scopes on 2 handguns. I took them off and replaced them with red dots. I had a Eo-tec on my RSRH in .454 and loved it. At the time, they were illegal for hunting but now the laws have changed and they are now legal. I sold the Eo-tec too soon.
Now I have a Bushnell red dot on my S&W K-22 masterpiece in .22LR and it works great to 50 yds. The Eo-tec worked great on the RSRH in .454. Should work well on your .44 mag. How far are you planning to shoot? I try to keep my shots under 100 yds. on cow elk and deer and have done well. If I want or need to shoot farther, I use my rifle.
 

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EO-Tech

View attachment 22282

Or what kind of scope would you recommend?
THX,
Anahuac1

I finally got a email back from EO-Tech and this is the response I got, copy and pasted. This is their recommendation on options for the type of scope they would put on a Ruger Redhawk .44 magnum.
========================================

Hello

I would suggest looking at the model 512.A65 or the XPS2-0. Both of these will attach to a mil spec 1913Picatinny or Weaver rail system. They also both have the 65MOA ring with a 1MOA aiming dot for the retical. The main difference in these two are the batteries. The 512 uses two AA batteries were as the XPS2-0 uses one CR123 battery. Since the XPS2-0 uses one battery it has a smaller profile and takes up less rail space over the 512 that has a longer front battery compartment. Both the model 512 and XPS2-0 are recoil tested to withstand the kick of the .50 Cal BMG machine gun.

Thank You,
Consumer Support Specialist
 

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Are you surprised that a manufacturer would recommend their products for an application when you ask them an open ended question? When's the last time your barber told you that you DIDN'T need a haircut?

Have you ever owned an Eotech 512 or XPS2? Have you ever used a red dot on a revolver, let alone a 512 or XPS2?
 

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Years ago (50) I tried a scope on my 44 3 screw flat top and it was a scope designed for pistols it was ok but not really to my liking, searched around and found a rear insert that was a peep sight, after about 20 rounds I decided to keep it, had no problem out to 100yds on pigs, of course the unit has now been retired for a while, at 77 I can no longer take the recoil.
 

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I usually give a tip to the barber. But I only go when I need a haircut.

Just thought I'd pass along the information. Who better to recommend a
scope than the manufacturer?

As far as hunting with a red dot it wouldn't be feasible. I like to get a magnified view of the vital shot.

Of course it doesn't take much to put a deer on the ground, but for me hunting and then tracking a deer that's been shot, isn't that fun.
 
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