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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everybody, I'm planning to go to the range this Saturday and shoot my new SR1911 and I had two ammo questions I need you're feedback on.

This is my first outing with an auto-loader. My background is all S/A and D/A revolvers, so if my questions sound strange, that's why, I am a rookie in this arena...:eek:

1) I bought 200 rounds of Federal Champion 230 gr. FMJ. What are your feelings about this ammo for target shooting purposes? I paid $29.00 per 100 rds. at the local Wal Mart here. I thought that was a pretty decent price...

2) is it not good for the spring mechanism in a magazine to remain loaded for long periods of time? Say like keep a couple of magazines loaded and on hand as in a home defense scenario?

I'd appreciate your feedback...:)
 

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I have been told (but don't have any facts to back it up) that spring tension doesn't weaken under compression. It weakens under movements. I don't know if its true or not so i rotate mine as well a few loaded a few unloaded.
 

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The Federal ammo works good in my Colt & I don't think it hurts to have loaded mags for extended periods of time in my experience
 

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I have heard the same about spring tension, it is the repeated loading/unloading that weakens them.

As far as Federal Champion ammo...it has been all I have used in 9mm with only a couple of boxes of Tula and WWB. I have never had any issues with the Federal ever.
 

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That ammo shoots well in my SR1911. It's as accurate as anything else I've tried. From some previous posts on mag springs it should'nt hurt them to leave them loaded. The flexing is what weakens them.
 

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The Federal works good in all my .45 autos and yes the loading and unloading of the magazines will weaken the spring metal.Leaving them loaded will not do any damage...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks so much guys for your responses! ;) In my newness to the auto-loader platform it helps me feel more at ease that I am doing the right things within my new shooting category. It's great to know I have this terrific Forum as a trusted resource.

I'll continue to monitor this thread for additional responses...thanks again! :)
 

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Just an additional point....

IF you have problems with FTF, FTE, etc, don't get too upset. Pistols often need to be broken in (the parts seating in) when first fired. This can not be any kind of an issue (SR's are usually 100% out of the box) or maybe it will. Don't loose faith in your SR if you do have problems at first, just keep going.

Also, be sure you've taken it apart (field strip) and did the clean/lube routine. Brandy new guns can often have too much grease or other 'stuff' left behind from the manufacturing process. RTFM for proper lube and don't over lube!

Good Shooting!
 

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Thanks Spike, good intel!

I'm going to break it down for cleaning and lube tomorrow in preparation for Saturday.

I read awhile back somewhere, I can't recall at this moment where, "when shooting any Model 1911 for the first time, only load 4-5 rounds in the magazine for the first 50 rounds"...have you or any of the other folks ever heard of such?
 

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I never had any ammo failures with my SR1911 other than a few early reloads when I just started loading for 45acp.

You are going to love that gun. I do think the SR has fairly tight springs, so real light plinker loads may not function well, but don't think you'd run into that with factory ammo.

I haven't tried Federal Champions so can't help you there.

If you reload or aspire to, be wary that some of the Federal 45 comes with small primers instead of large. Nothing wrong with that, just make sure you sort them before loading them. Not sure which the Champions have.

I haven't heard the 4-5 round thing. My only bit of advice is that the trigger is a lot different than a revolver so be cautious of that as it will probably go off sooner than you expect it to. That always makes me hit better though :)
 

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I read awhile back somewhere, I can't recall at this moment where, "when shooting any Model 1911 for the first time, only load 4-5 rounds in the magazine for the first 50 rounds"...have you or any of the other folks ever heard of such?
I would file that under 'nonsense.'

Any quality 1911 will shoot dead reliably with a decent quality* ball ammo unless something is wrong with the pistol. Most of the 'wrongs' are an extractor that needs tuning or bad magazines.

*Any American made ball ammo should be considered 'decent quality.' I've tried wolf ammo in .45 which had velocity variations of over 100fps and jammed often.
 

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andybothel, I did not know that about some 45acp having small primers. Something I'll pay attention to in the future when collecting used brass. Thanks for mentioning that.

JK55, Federal is name brand American quality ammo so you should be fine with it.
As for springs taking a set from bring kept compressed I believe a web search on this will relieve your anxiety about this. It did mine. If I'm not carrying or planning on shooting a pistol I leave the mags unloaded, but I have pistols that I carry on a regular basis that are always kept loaded.
But, to each their own. Do what you are most comfortable with.
 

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A1: Federal Champion from Walmart is good in my 1911s and the boxes that I bought have all been large primer. $29 per 100 is a great price and one that, as far as I can find, is tough to beat even when buying ammunition on-line once you factor in shipping costs.

A2: I found some magazines I loaded 25 years ago tucked away in one of my locked gun cases. They, and the ammo inside 'em, worked just fine. Load up your magazines to full capacity and don't worry.

If your SR1911 is a bit finicky it will loosen up and set in after a few hundred rounds. I tend to run my new 1911s a bit on the wet side. That is, I want a light but visible coat of oil on the rails, slide and barrel. These days I also sometimes use Stainless stick grease from Brownells as the grease does not run away from heat and does not bleed out so much. Any good lube will do fine though, so if you are a froglube fan have at it.
 

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that federal is fine in the SR1911. That's about the cheapest you'll find new ammo in a store for-those boxes can be hard to find, too. my advice--buy all of it you can at that price.

and, to echo the comments above, it'll take a good hundred or so to get her broken in, at least--so don't give up on the ammo right away
 

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...when shooting any Model 1911 for the first time, only load 4-5 rounds in the magazine for the first 50 rounds"...have you or any of the other folks ever heard of such?
Serious folklore! I cannot even guess where that came from.

Any FMJ (aka 'ball') ammo should work 100% in a 1911. In fact, that's usually the only stuff a 1911 manufacturer will stand behind. I'd offer that you should stick with that for the first few hundred rounds, then start experimenting on what else *your* 1911 will handle.

I have a 3" 1911 (Para Slim Hawg) that is pretty much a 50% jam-0-matic on any ammo that has is JHP with flat sides. I tried a Colt Defender - basically the same routine.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
My continued thanks guys for all the good feedback and pointers!

I'll keep monitoring this thread as I do need and appreciate you're expertise on the topic!

I'm lookin' forward in providing a good range report of this Saturday's SR1911 debut.

Again, many thanks for your help!
 

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If your SR1911 is a bit finicky it will loosen up and set in after a few hundred rounds.
I never understood why people use ammo to break in their pistols...
Detail strip and clean first. Grab the back of the slide and cycle it back and forth a few hundred times- it'll do the same thing and won't cost $50 in ammo to do it.

Try this procedure for best results: Reliability Tweaks1: Make it Smooth - THR
The man who wrote that post has forgotten more about the ins and outs of 1911s than most gunsmiths know to start with.
 

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This so called "break in" period needed with 1911s before they can be expected to become reliable shooters has been repeated so often as to become folklore. Sure, now and then you might find yourself with a jam-o-matic, but the three 1911s I've owned, so far, have been as reliable, right out of the box as any other semiauto pistol I've owned. In fact, the very few issues I've had could be traced to the magazines, rather than the guns, themselves. The guns, when feed with 230 grain hardball and used with a good magazine, were more than reliable enough to use for SD work, right out of the box.

Moreover, if I bought a 1911 that had chronic problems with FTEs or FTFs, right out of the box, and I had done my part to solve the problem by trying different ammo and magazines and by using proper shooting form (no limp wristing), I would not accept some lame recommendation or demand from a manufacturer to keep shooting the gun and spending more money on ammo to see if the problems go away. That's a load of horse manure. No one should have to shoot 500 or 700 rounds before they can get a reliable pistol.

The odds of you having any serious issues with the SR1911 are remote, anyway. My SR1911, shooting 230 grain hardball of all makes, has been utterly reliable, right out of the box, from the very first shot. Over a 1000 rounds, now, and not a single hiccup. My Springfield Range officer needed a little magazine help, but once I found a magazine it liked and did a little tweaking on the factory mags, it's been perfect. My Remington R1E was equally good, once I got the right magazine.

The good news is that the magazines supplied with the SR1911 are decent. Okay, not Ed Brown quality, but they work. In fact, I've used the Ruger magazines as a control to isolate the magazine as the culprit when shooting the Springfield and the Remington. Both liked the Ruger magazines better than the factory supplied mags. :)

Just keep that SR cleaned and lubed and, like brimic says, do a little cycling of the action at home and you'll be fine. Enjoy your SR. My SR is the last gun I would ever sell.
 
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