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Hey guys,
New to the 45acp, just picked up my new sr1911, just looking at some hornady tips and they have .451 and .452, what do I get, Im assuming the .451's, can I use the .452's, can someone explain the difference please ?
Thanks
 

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the difference is the diameter:D

Use .451" for jacketed ammo
 

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Discussion Starter #3
the difference is the diameter:D

Use .451" for jacketed ammo
Thanks Darkker
I just read a bit online about this, .451 for jacketed tips and .452 for lead tips, either way I would like to hear some more on this subject.
 

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Thanks Darkker
I just read a bit online about this, .451 for jacketed tips and .452 for lead tips, either way I would like to hear some more on this subject.
Go to the forum "CastBoolits" and learn more than you want to know.

"Boolits" is what some people have decided is the correct spelling for bullets made of cast lead, reserving the term "Bullets" for jacketed projectiles.

Lead is softer than copper (the most common jacketing material). But it melts when exposed to the hot products of combustion (the gasses blowing by the sides of a bullet that does not fill the bore and seal it).

If the hot gasses can get past the base of the lead bullet, the lead tends to melt a little, and inevitably deposit on the inside of your barrel's bore. "Leading" is the term and to be avoided if possible.

So, if the lead bullet is just a little oversized for your bore, it will get squeezed down to an exact fit. This squeezing is called "swaging".

If you think this is complicated, try shooting a revolver, where the bullet passes through the chamber throat, past the cylinder/barrel gap and enters a forcing cone before encountering the barrel proper, and the rifling.

Anyhow, that exact fit seals the bore. It is hard to get a bullet to bump UP in size (It is doable, and called "obturation", or "upset", look it up with google or the search feature.)

So that is why lead bullets should be slightly larger than the diameter of your bore (measured at the grooves, not the lands).

Copper-jacketed bullets are harder to swage to fit, thus must be closer in size to your bore. But the copper fouling is lighter in amount less problematic to shooting than leadin(harder to clean out, though not needed as often).

Get a copy of ABC's of reloading or most any loading manual that talks about fouling of barrels and most of your questions will be answered. I hope this little intro serves to whet your appetite for more knowledge.

The lay terms "tip" or "head" for bullets is common enough, but ballisticians use specific terms. The most egregious mis-use is to call an assembled cartridge (consisting of a primer, propellant, bullet and case) a "bullet". Precision of terminology (especially in print, where nuances are often lost and feedback is slow) is vital to communication. Plus, some people get uptight. Nobody in this thread so far (just a little teasing), but sometimes.

To recapitulate:

You want a lead bullet to be guaranteed to swage down to seal the bore to prevent leading and get good accuracy. Bullet manufacturers cannot depend on all bores being exactly the same size, so oversizing (just a little) is standard with lead.

You want a jacketed bullet to be closer to the actual bore size because it does not swage down as easily as lead (and you don't want to increase pressures unduly). Fortunately, copper does not melt and foul your bore like lead does.

Good luck and thanks for asking our advice

Lost Sheep
 

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.451" jacketed bullets are meant for the .45 ACP. They are what you want to use in your SR 1911.

.452" jacketed bullets are meant for the .45 Colt.

If you want to use swaged lead (like Hornady makes) or cast lead bullet loads, the general practice is to use a bullet that is .001" larger in diameter than your pistols bore. In the case of the SR 1911, this means a .452" lead bullet.

Gunmakers aren't perfect and sometimes an off size barrel makes it off the assembly line. This is why shooters "slug" their bores so that they are sure of the pistols exact bore diameter and then use bullets .001" larger in diameter. ;)
 

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Tips? Is this something like "heads?"
They are bullets.
Reloading manuals are your friend.
0.451" is standard for jacketed. 0.452" is standard for lead bullets in barrels with a groove diameter of 0.451" or less.
You can use bullets up to 0.454" without issue (0.453" and 0.454" lead bullets are often more accurate than 0.452").
Just remember--start with the lowest starting load you can find and work up.
 

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Reloading manuals are your friend.
+1 gazillion!

It's just not smart to reload without having read atleast 2 reloading manuals.
My favorite is Lyman's 49th Reloading Handbook.
It's available at almost any bookstore/reloading supply store ($20 or so).
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/21...dbook-49th-edition-reloading-manual-softcover

My 2nd favorite is a series called One Book, One Caliber.
It has reloading data from about a dozen resourses all in one book for about $6-$9

Loadbooks USA 45 ACP Reloading Manual

If that isn't available to you, try your local library, they may have a reloading manual.
(that's how I started - I wanted to know what I was getting into before I plunked down any money)
 

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Did you slug the barrel? I use .451 jacketed bullets in my 1911's and I size all my cast bullets to .451!
 
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