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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone!

My cylinder seized up recently on my .44 mag Redhawk. It turns but very roughly, and the cylinder will no longer shut. I went to disassemble it to give it a good cleaning, the revolver is only about 6 years old. I have removed the cylinder arm and crane assembly from the main body, but I cannot for the life of me remove the cylinder from the crane and arm. Is there some special way to remove it? As far as I know, I thought it was a simple pair of retention balls, that should give with some force. Any thoughts?
 

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To remove the cylinder from the crane, you must first remove the front latch parts and then the ejector rod from the crane. From your photo, it appears that you already removed the front latch pivot.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
To remove the cylinder from the crane, you must first remove the front latch parts and then the ejector rod from the crane. From your photo, it appears that you already removed the front latch pivot.
I've removed all of that plus the ejector rod. (See photo)

I have consulted the manual and multiple tear-down videos. Everyone literally just "pops" off the cylinder after removing the ejector rod and front latch. I don't know what else I could possibly be missing.

I've put a lot of effort into trying to pry it apart, any more and I feel like I'd risk damaging the crane or the cylinder internals.
 

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Ah, I think I understand what's occurring. The two retaining balls that are staked in the crane tube are likely choked-up with debris/fouling. When you remove the ejector rod, those two balls are supposed to move slightly into the bore of the crane tube, releasing the cylinder from the tube. Use some solvent, such as Hoppes No.9 in there, and gently blow it out with compressed air. A seal pick with a slight bend near the tip inserted in the crane tube can help in moving the balls to dislodge the crud.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ah, I think I understand what's occurring. The two retaining balls that are staked in the crane tube are likely choked-up with debris/fouling. When you remove the ejector rod, those two balls are supposed to move slightly into the bore of the crane tube, releasing the cylinder from the tube. Use some solvent, such as Hoppes No.9 in there, and gently blow it out with compressed air. A seal pick with a slight bend near the tip inserted in the crane tube can help in moving the balls to dislodge the crud.
Ok thank you, ill give it a shot. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ah, I think I understand what's occurring. The two retaining balls that are staked in the crane tube are likely choked-up with debris/fouling. When you remove the ejector rod, those two balls are supposed to move slightly into the bore of the crane tube, releasing the cylinder from the tube. Use some solvent, such as Hoppes No.9 in there, and gently blow it out with compressed air. A seal pick with a slight bend near the tip inserted in the crane tube can help in moving the balls to dislodge the crud.
Took a flashlight and pick like you recommended and interesting thing is that I see one ball, but the opposite one isn't there. Just a hole where it should be. Is it possible for them to break in between the tube and the cylinder?
 

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Took a flashlight and pick like you recommended and interesting thing is that I see one ball, but the opposite one isn't there. Just a hole where it should be. Is it possible for them to break in between the tube and the cylinder?
The machining tolerances in there are very tight, so I suspect that one ball is tucked up in the retaining groove machined in the cylinder center bore, but still captive in the crane tube. A good flushing with solvent and turning the cylinder and shaking the crane/cylinder assembly should bring it out.
 
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