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I believe it's price will be a big turnoff for most folks. It also has way too much of a bland look about it. If they were going to price it at over $900 MSRP, then it needed to look the part in some way. As it now stands, (based on the pictures available), it doesn't have an exciting modern "black rifle tacticool" look about it, and doesn't have much in the way of an "old school classy" look either.
Maybe if it was being sold as an inexpensive alternative 9mm PCC, but it's price will likely make it mostly a dud on the market, (in my opinion).

Now, if this gun had a MSRP of about $650 - $675, and could maybe be found at a nicer $550 - $600 street price... well, then I feel it would have a better chance of becoming a winner on the market... Again, just my opinion 👍
 

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IMHO ... the wood stock gives it the classy look that I want. The black rifle tacticool tag is a big turn off for me. I get it, the younger crowd is into that look and that's fine to each their own.
One point we can agree on is the MSRP ... it needs to be lower for blue collar guys like me to afford one.
I'm not saying that it should have been made "tacticool" or "old school classy", only that, imo, it doesn't hit the mark on either.
I mean, yes, it absolutely leans on the traditional end of things, with blued steel and wood... But, imo, it misses the mark at being a classy looking gun. Just like those Crossman BB guns shown above, this new Henry is just a bland looking firearm. And, if you are MSRP'ing it for over $900, then it just seems it should have been made to look the part of a nice traditional firearm with some more class to it.
The version with the Glock magazine well is slated to have a MSRP of over $950... Nope, this 9mm is simply overpriced for what it is.
It's price being high wouldn't be such a bad thing, if what one was getting seemed reasonable for what one was paying.
$900+ for a bland looking PCC... Well, we shall see how it sells. I have never been a fan of Henry's products, and this doesn't change my feelings about them at all.
When it comes to Henry's lever guns, they got a real nice boost in their popularity when Marlin was starting their decline and it went totally bad and even belly up after being sold to Remington. They simply screwed the pooch with their Marlin gun manufacturing. Well, with Ruger slowly, but surely, inching forward with their Marlin lever action guns, the reintroduced competition will certainly be affecting Henry's sales. Especially since Ruger is keeping the forged steel receiver and lever in place and doing a great job in making a quality Marlin gun again. So, I don't blame Henry for looking to open their base by producing guns that have not been their big focus in the past. That said, this new $900+ PCC of theirs is missing the mark, and mostly because Henry is not keeping this new offering very viable for many folks because of it's price point. It's not that most gun owners couldn't buy one if they wanted to, but at that price range that they are in, many will just balk at having to dish out that much hard earned cash for such a bland gun.
Again, just my opinion.... But, we shall see 👍
 

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In my area it is the exact opposite. Us "old guys" like black rifles. Our youngins like the crap we had in the 70's. I like it all, but having been around the block now, I like things that work. Lose barrel nuts, cracked stocks, pretty wood, just gets torn up. Just me though.
I'm in my late 50's, and that's likely why I like both, old and newer school stuff.
What I mean is, my generation saw a lot of both while growing up. We were in the era where Cowboy movies with old school lever action guns was still a very big thing, and guns like the M16, Uzi, MP5, and AK's were the types of guns often seen in military use around the world. So, yeah, I grew up during part of that transition time for guns. Where guys liked their AR's for their modern looks and features, but also liked their Mini-14's for their more traditional appearance.

The biggest changes I've seen in more recent times, is the total transitioning to folks going more onboard with plastics in guns, it currently dominating the handgun market by so many guns now having polymer frames like Glock is so well known for. Also, the battery operated optics have gotten so much smaller and reliable and have gained a position now of being the new norm.
Yup, I myself like all sorts of guns, and my age and era of being raised up, has a lot to do with that 👍
 

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It’s a big pond, plenty of market share for all tastes.

I’m sure we’re all aware that some models of Ruger’s PC Carbine have an MSRP of $1009.

The starting MSRP for a new basic Henry PCC is in the $925 range.

The starting MSRP for a basic Ruger PCC is in the $780 range. And... the Ruger PC Carbine will already come with both a Ruger magazine compatible magazine well adapter and a Glock magazine compatible magazine well adapter... There are no extra fees added for both adapters being included with the gun.

On the other hand, Henry is planning to offer their PCC at a slight premium for having a Glock magazine compatible mag well over one that is set up to take their proprietary Henry magazine.

Also, the Ruger PCC has now gained some years of proven track record, while the Henry PCC will still have to prove itself.
 

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I suppose, but I still take exception to calling the M1 Carbine a PCC.
I 100% agree with you. The .30 caliber M1 Carbine cartridge, while obviously not designed to be a powerful rifle cartridge, was indeed designed to be fired from a lightweight, short overall length, rifle, (hence the cartridge being called the 'M1 Carbine'.
Although the M1 Carbine round may have similarities to some handgun cartridges, it was not intended for handgun use... It was intended for use in a Carbine, (Rifle).
So, you are correct in not considering an M1 Carbine to be a 'PCC', (Pistol Caliber Carbine), because the M1 Carbine cartridge is not a pistol cartridge.

M1 Carbine Cartridge...

The .30 Carbine (7.62×33mm) is a rimless carbine/rifle cartridge used in the M1 carbine introduced in the 1940s. It is a light rifle round designed to be fired from the M1 carbine's 18-inch (458 mm) barrel.
 
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