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Ruger .44 Carbine, Security-Six, Service-Six, Mini-14, .30 Carbine Blackhawk
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In my area it is the exact opposite. Us "old guys" like black rifles. Our youngins like the crap we had in the 70's. I like it all, but having been around the block now, I like things that work. Lose barrel nuts, cracked stocks, pretty wood, just gets torn up. Just me though.
I'm in my late 50's, and that's likely why I like both, old and newer school stuff.
What I mean is, my generation saw a lot of both while growing up. We were in the era where Cowboy movies with old school lever action guns was still a very big thing, and guns like the M16, Uzi, MP5, and AK's were the types of guns often seen in military use around the world. So, yeah, I grew up during part of that transition time for guns. Where guys liked their AR's for their modern looks and features, but also liked their Mini-14's for their more traditional appearance.

The biggest changes I've seen in more recent times, is the total transitioning to folks going more onboard with plastics in guns, it currently dominating the handgun market by so many guns now having polymer frames like Glock is so well known for. Also, the battery operated optics have gotten so much smaller and reliable and have gained a position now of being the new norm.
Yup, I myself like all sorts of guns, and my age and era of being raised up, has a lot to do with that 👍
 

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It’s a big pond, plenty of market share for all tastes.

I’m sure we’re all aware that some models of Ruger’s PC Carbine have an MSRP of $1009.

The starting MSRP for a new basic Henry PCC is in the $925 range.

The starting MSRP for a basic Ruger PCC is in the $780 range. And... the Ruger PC Carbine will already come with both a Ruger magazine compatible magazine well adapter and a Glock magazine compatible magazine well adapter... There are no extra fees added for both adapters being included with the gun.

On the other hand, Henry is planning to offer their PCC at a slight premium for having a Glock magazine compatible mag well over one that is set up to take their proprietary Henry magazine.

Also, the Ruger PCC has now gained some years of proven track record, while the Henry PCC will still have to prove itself.
 

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Ruger: Model 19122 pc 9
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Pdw is one of those terms I really do not get. I kind of get the gist on one hand, but on the other, nope.
Personal Defense Weapon. I have been schooled on it a few times here in forum land.
The issue is, the term can mean anything to the peson saying it. As it should. The problem is folks say it like it has some specific application.
I just think its odd.
If I am under personal attack by drug runners, maybe a rpg is a pdw, or a laws, or a patriot missile?
 

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Ruger .44 Carbine, Security-Six, Service-Six, Mini-14, .30 Carbine Blackhawk
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Both would fit in the PDW catagory I would think.
I suppose, but I still take exception to calling the M1 Carbine a PCC.
 

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I suppose, but I still take exception to calling the M1 Carbine a PCC.
I 100% agree with you. The .30 caliber M1 Carbine cartridge, while obviously not designed to be a powerful rifle cartridge, was indeed designed to be fired from a lightweight, short overall length, rifle, (hence the cartridge being called the 'M1 Carbine'.
Although the M1 Carbine round may have similarities to some handgun cartridges, it was not intended for handgun use... It was intended for use in a Carbine, (Rifle).
So, you are correct in not considering an M1 Carbine to be a 'PCC', (Pistol Caliber Carbine), because the M1 Carbine cartridge is not a pistol cartridge.

M1 Carbine Cartridge...

The .30 Carbine (7.62×33mm) is a rimless carbine/rifle cartridge used in the M1 carbine introduced in the 1940s. It is a light rifle round designed to be fired from the M1 carbine's 18-inch (458 mm) barrel.
 

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Ruger .44 Carbine, Security-Six, Service-Six, Mini-14, .30 Carbine Blackhawk
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I 100% agree with you. The .30 caliber M1 Carbine cartridge, while obviously not designed to be a powerful rifle cartridge, was indeed designed to be fired from a lightweight, short overall length, rifle, (hence the cartridge being called the 'M1 Carbine'.
Although the M1 Carbine round may have similarities to some handgun cartridges, it was not intended for handgun use... It was intended for use in a Carbine, (Rifle).
So, you are correct in not considering an M1 Carbine to be a 'PCC', (Pistol Caliber Carbine), because the M1 Carbine cartridge is not a pistol cartridge.

M1 Carbine Cartridge...

The .30 Carbine (7.62×33mm) is a rimless carbine/rifle cartridge used in the M1 carbine introduced in the 1940s. It is a light rifle round designed to be fired from the M1 carbine's 18-inch (458 mm) barrel.
Technically, the M1 Carbine is a CCC (Carbine Caliber Carbine) :ROFLMAO:
 

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Ruger .44 Carbine, Security-Six, Service-Six, Mini-14, .30 Carbine Blackhawk
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I actually never referred to an M1 Carbine as such. My comparison was only to a light weight semi auto rifle.
My mistake then.
The thread is a discussion of Henry's new 9mm PCC and you posted that your M1 Carbine fills that need and I saw no reference to any other light weight semi auto rifle prior to your post, so it seemed you were comparing to the PCC.
 

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SBH, SP101, GP100, AR MPR, G19.5, G20.4
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It looks like a Crossman? Really? from a couple photos! And when did Crossman use Missouri walnut furniture?
I’m actually a bit anti Henry and very pro Ruger, but this looks far better quality than a Ruger PCC
 
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SBH, SP101, GP100, AR MPR, G19.5, G20.4
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I think the block shaped forearm is what he’s referring to about the Crossman. The shape of the receiver made me think of a Franchi shotgun. I like it.
The receiver looks like they took a Big Boy in rough and machined it different and with the semi auto trigger group a new carbine is born. Lol
 

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The .30 Carbine is classified as an "intermediate" cartridge and not a pistol cartridge.
I guess that's why I take exception to it being called or compared to a PCC.
 

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Pdw is one of those terms I really do not get. I kind of get the gist on one hand, but on the other, nope.
Personal Defense Weapon. I have been schooled on it a few times here in forum land.
The issue is, the term can mean anything to the peson saying it. As it should. The problem is folks say it like it has some specific application.
I just think its odd.
If I am under personal attack by drug runners, maybe a rpg is a pdw, or a laws, or a patriot missile?
Since PDW's can be anything from sharp pencils and car keys to shoulder-fired AT weapons, you are correct - PDW can mean anything to the person saying it.

The way things are going now, I wouldn't mind having a couple of shoulder-fired AT weapons. A Stinger or two would be nice also.
 

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Since PDW's can be anything from sharp pencils and car keys to shoulder-fired AT weapons, you are correct - PDW can mean anything to the person saying it.

The way things are going now, I wouldn't mind having a couple of shoulder-fired AT weapons. A Stinger or two would be nice also.
A personal defense weapon (PDW) is usually defined as a light, compact and easy to use firearm, generally intended for self-defense and security rather than warfare and infantry.

I'm not sure if shoulder fired AT weapons fall into that category. :ROFLMAO:

However, you are correct that the definition changes due to the context.
 

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... generally intended for self-defense and security rather than warfare and infantry.
I'm not sure if shoulder fired AT weapons fall into that category. :ROFLMAO:

However, you are correct that the definition changes due to the context.
We are getting off-topic here, but I like being facetious responding to some replies. With the militarization of the nation's police forces (BearCat's and Sentinel's come to mind) and biden's threat of F15's, shoulder-fired AT and AA weapons just might be needed by the citizenry for self-defense and security.
 
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