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Ruger .44 Carbine, Security-Six, Service-Six, Mini-14, .30 Carbine Blackhawk
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I don't find it to be a bad looking carbine and it will have appeal to those who want a PCC but want to stay away from tactical looking ones. (which seem to be most of them now)

I have a friend that chose a wood stocked Mini-14 over an AR for that reason.

ETA: I'm happy with my Marlin Camp 9, so I'm not looking for another 9mm carbine. :)
 

· Viceroy 🟩🟩🟩
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I don't know what to think. At first I was really excited that someone's actually making a halfway attractive PCC with a wood stock.

But then I realized that I'm ambivalent about pistol caliber carbines in general. And especially when they tend to be really heavy and cumbersome.

In my mind, the one and only significant purpose for a carbine like that is around the house. A "leaning up against the bedside table" sort of thing. In theory, such a gun would be:

  • A nice blend of moderate (but not necessarily over-penetrative) power
  • Small / light / nimble to use in a house
  • Relatively lower noise / lower flash than a 5.56 rifle, or a handgun in the same caliber

The Beretta CX4 Storm is advertised as 5.6 pounds and 29.7" overall length, and that's the most I'd want it to be. It may look like a Star Wars prop gun, but the specifications and ergonomics are good.

The Ruger PC carbine is advertised as >1 pound heavier, and >4 inches longer than the Beretta, and I always found it to be surprisingly fat and clunky for what it is -- a rifle chambered for a medium-powered pistol cartridge. Thus I've never really been impressed with the Ruger.

Maybe I'm missing the data in the articles on the Henry, but I have not yet seen the specs on the Henry in terms of weight and overall length.

Also, regarding that wood stock and receiver finish......

In the world of shotguns, that wood is what you'd call "crate wood". It looks slightly better than some old Walmart 870 Express, but not a lot better.

This photo, pasted below, makes me worry that the finish is a dull matte that will easily be scuffed up. Proper, glossy bluing is more durable in the long run.

To be honest, Henry could have gone more up-market for my tastes, even if it added on another $200 or $300 to MSRP. This rifle is put to shame by some of the nicer Browning BAR versions. This looks like a gun I'd expect from some more "popularly priced" brands (including Ruger), but not from Henry.

(And no, I'm not saying the gun is in the same market category as a BAR. I'm just saying Browning knows how to make a lovely rifle that stands out from the Tupperware Gun riffraff, and Henry should have followed suit.)

On the up-side.....

The pressed "checkering" (or whatever you'd call that) at least looks to be good and sharp, for grip with sweaty or gloved hands.

The butt pad is a traditional, flat attachment to the wood. Lately a lot of shotgun and rifle manufacturers have been building stupid / proprietary curved butts that only fit their own pads. Take a look at the Franchi Affinity shotgun butt as a horrific example. Seems like Henry got this one right so you can always add on a longer pad, as an easy way to adjust LOP.

I also like the safety position and size / shape. It looks easy to find and use with gloves on.

White Sleeve Air gun Grey Material property
 

· Viceroy 🟩🟩🟩
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Screen grabs from one of the SHOT Show videos showing the wood and metal up close.

The wood is bland but "good enough" for a pickup truck gun or casual plinker. (But that's not it's price point. At least... not by pre-pandemic price standards.)

There is already a nick taken out of the wood at the front of the comb. It's probably soft and will not age well.

The texturing does look very grippy.

The metal finish is also looking very "popularly priced" in appearance. Yes I know it's dusty and dirty from being demoed outdoors, but this is certainly not a "hang over the mantle" gun in my estimation.

In my opinion, this isn't the 9mm carbine Henry should have made.

I'll be interesting to see what it weighs in at, and how good / bad the trigger pull is.


Wood Thigh Fender Tints and shades Knee


Wood Knife Hunting knife Everyday carry Material property
 

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SBH, SP101, GP100, AR MPR, G19.5, G20.4
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“It’s probably soft”. Well it’s walnut.
 
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· Viceroy 🟩🟩🟩
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Well it’s walnut.
Which means it could be all over the place.

I've got low-budget guns that have "walnut" stocks that are nothing to write home about, and they seem quite prone to dents and chips. And I've got guns with walnut stocks where the wooden butt and forearm set alone cost >$2500, and they still look like new despite very heavy usage.
 

· Viceroy 🟩🟩🟩
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If it were a 10 mm I’d have my FFL looking for one. A 9 mm, not so much.
I was thinking the same thing. If you ever read "Jeff Cooper's Commentaries", he promoted the idea for several rifles including the "Scout Rifle" concept that is widely used today.

Another idea was the "Thumper" rifle, being a short, light, semi-auto carbine in a relatively large round like 10mm. A google search will bring up lots of stuff from him about it.

I recall that he was still alive when the Beretta CX4 Storm came out, and he posted a "commentary" that he had asked Beretta to try and chamber it for a bigger bore and more powerful cartridge to meet his Thumper criteria. They said it couldn't be done with that platform. He said that it could be if they put their mind to it. Typical Cooper. :)

Whether or not his concept has merit or any practical application is another conversation -- but I always think of Cooper when people mention pistol caliber carbines chambered in 10mm or the like.
 

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If you don't need over 100 yard capability the PCC with shared mags has quite a bit going for it. Cheaper fairly light weight ammo, Shared mags, easily suppressed and in some models light weight. Ruger PCC is too heavy. Mine either fold or take down. The Henry does not look like a California Liberal's nightmare and is fairly light weight. I think it will sell. My Keltec Sub2K will remain my go to 9mm PCC. If I need a little more power within the PCC concept I will go with my 357.
 

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Ruger .44 Carbine, Security-Six, Service-Six, Mini-14, .30 Carbine Blackhawk
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I think you you what I was talkin about, but no problem.
I think you knew exactly what you said, but no problem.
 

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It still is not on the Henry website. I am seeing weight called out at 5+ lbs and 6.6 lbs. We won't know for sure until Henry puts out a spec sheet. Under 6 lbs would be interesting. 6.6 lbs not so much.
6.6lbs would be pretty close to my Marlin Camp 9 @ 6.75lbs. It's a heavy sucker.
So yeah, under 6 would be good..
 
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· Grand Inquisitor
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I like that gun. The classic lines remind me of Crossman BB rifles of my childhood. I own one "Black Rifle" and that's enough. It's fun to shoot but ugly. I've never warmed up to it. I shoot about 100 rounds / year to keep trained with it, all slow-fire.

On the other hand, I feel happy whenever I pick up my Henry lever-gun in .357. It's the rifle I WANT to shoot. I'm Type-A, so the wood and blued steel on my oldest gun (and old Mossberg New Haven) still looks as good as the day I got it, in 1985. And it's been used heavily for hunting. I just am careful where I put a gun down.

Yeah, aesthetics dictate a lot for me. I hate polymer frames on handguns partly because they look ugly. My first 9 was a Star BM that belonged to my late brother. It looks cool. I like the heft. The CZ-75 I have is my "new gun," and it's a joy to shoot. Like the Henry, I look forward to it.

Yep. I see a plinker like this Henry semi in my future, as 9 is cheap and unlike .22, I can reload for it.
 

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Which means it could be all over the place.

I've got low-budget guns that have "walnut" stocks that are nothing to write home about, and they seem quite prone to dents and chips. And I've got guns with walnut stocks where the wooden butt and forearm set alone cost >$2500, and they still look like new despite very heavy usage.
It’s rather common knowledge and bragging rights Henry uses good Missouri Walnut.
 
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I like the look and wood on the Henry. Can't wait to hear some real reviews from real owners once these are out on the street.
A PC Carbine is on the top of my "next" list, but I really have no need for a takedown rifle. I do have an SR9 and a bunch of mags, so that's a plus. But a takedown is just not necessary for me.

It's nice to have options, but it sure makes it harder to decide .
 

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First that I've heard of this. I find PCC a bit odd but having the caliber in my hand- and long- firearms is appealing. I know the 5.7x28mm have both and revolver rounds do also. I shot Ruger's PCC and was not really impressed but it had little felt recoil and could shoot further than I could see. They do look like a fun gun as opposed to a working gun. A PCC in 9mm is only my buy list for the future.
 

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I would certainly take a look at the Henry. Own 14 other Henry's, whats 1 more. The stippiling on the stock mimics my CZ Varmint & provides nice purchase. Picked up a Beretta cx4 storm in FDE last May. instantly fell in love with its ergonomics. Shoulders so quick & tucks right in. Threw on an EoTech & never looked back. Like ferralcatkiller stated earlier, I to found the Ruger pcc9 clunky, chunky and just not that comfortable of a rifle to shoot so I sold the ruger last fall.
 
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