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I reloaded for years, then life got in the way. My stuff has been packed up since about 2005, and I recently unpacked it. Looking at all that stuff, I was somewhat overwhelmed. I grabbed the old manuals, and realized how out of date they were. I bought a new manual. I am reading the new manual. I dug out the Dillon instruction video. I am watching the video repeatedly.

I actually started with a Lee Loader hand load set as a teen. I do not recommend it, as it required a mallet to perform the functions of a press. The good part, though, was the instructions were so simple even I could figure them out.
 

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Discussion Starter #62
I just thought I’d pass this along, do with it what you will. We all as reloaders are all trying to get those “bug hole” groups, I have something to offer that may help.

This has to do with measured concentricity (run-out) on case necks and bullets. The fix is a #17 O-Ring on the underside of the die lock ring. Doing this allows the die to self align itself to the case that’s being sized.

If the flat surface on the top of your press is not perfectly square with the thread axis on your die it can end up slightly off angle. This happens when the bottom of the die lock ring butts up tight against the top of the press. The O-Ring allows the die to float a little which “may” reduce the amount of run-out induced during case sizing.

Now this is not a guaranteed fix, but I have a concentricity gauge so I have the ability to see the difference between O-Ring and no O-Ring. If you don’t have a way to check for run-out you should be able to see it on your targets. You may think correcting your run-out by only .002 isn’t a big deal, but you will see a difference, even at 100yds.

I also use them on my seating die.....same concept.

As with anything people are going to see mixed results, but for the price of a Happy Meal at McDonalds you can probably outfit most of your dies, ($2.49 average price for 10). Or you can purchase a coax press ($250 minimum), it will do the same thing, only much better.
 

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I just thought I’d pass this along, do with it what you will. We all as reloaders are all trying to get those “bug hole” groups, I have something to offer that may help.

This has to do with measured concentricity (run-out) on case necks and bullets. The fix is a #17 O-Ring on the underside of the die lock ring. Doing this allows the die to self align itself to the case that’s being sized.

If the flat surface on the top of your press is not perfectly square with the thread axis on your die it can end up slightly off angle. This happens when the bottom of the die lock ring butts up tight against the top of the press. The O-Ring allows the die to float a little which “may” reduce the amount of run-out induced during case sizing.

Now this is not a guaranteed fix, but I have a concentricity gauge so I have the ability to see the difference between O-Ring and no O-Ring. If you don’t have a way to check for run-out you should be able to see it on your targets. You may think correcting your run-out by only .002 isn’t a big deal, but you will see a difference, even at 100yds.

I also use them on my seating die.....same concept.

As with anything people are going to see mixed results, but for the price of a Happy Meal at McDonalds you can probably outfit most of your dies, ($2.49 average price for 10). Or you can purchase a coax press ($250 minimum), it will do the same thing, only much better.
Good info, thanks!
 

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I like this idea. I used to reload in the 1990s (38 spl/357 mag, 30-06, 7.62X39, 223 and 45) and I watched some youtube videos about reloading .380 ACP. After I bought some ammo for the .380 ACP ($18.00 a box) I thought, WOW! I have a reloader in storage in the basement. I pulled out the press (cleaned it up), and cleaned up the other pieces that I had. All I need to do now is buy the .380 ACP dies and the case sizing tool. I think it will be fun to get back into reloading.
 

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Discussion Starter #65
Flash holes

Something I’ve found that helps get a good and consistent powder burn is to debur the flash holes. After the flash holes are drilled there’s always a little left over brass hanging on which can lead to an uneven ignition.

More than one company makes these mine just happens to be an RCBS. It’s as easy as putting a caliber specific collar on the shaft, insert it in the case mouth and spinning it the same way one would on a primer pocket.

The debris on the white paper is brass shaving from 12 pieces of brass.
 

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I recently started reloading and bought a well known kit, I also bought lumber and I built a quality work bench to mount it on. In the back of my mind I knew I could do it, but I was very hesitant to say the least so the stuff sat unused for a bit. I guess I was nervous or scared to try it, but little by little I started. Reading all I could and youtube helped me greatly, my first 50 rounds of 223 took me 3 hours to produce from start to finish. It's only been a few weeks since I started but I have learned a lot and have gotten much quicker and way better, and by the way the ammo shoots great. I'm sticking with this one caliber for a bit until I feel totally comfortable, and only then will I branch out. So if anyone reading this is on the fence about starting out, it's really easy once you get those first couple of rounds under your belt. It's also a very fun and satisfying hobby.
 

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Mark204 sea: "If the flat surface on the top of your press is not perfectly square with the thread axis on your die it can end up slightly off angle."

GONRA sez - SEND IT BACK AND GET A NEW PRESS!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #68
Mark204 sea: "If the flat surface on the top of your press is not perfectly square with the thread axis on your die it can end up slightly off angle."

GONRA sez - SEND IT BACK AND GET A NEW PRESS!!!
What makes you think it’s press? Maybe it’s the press, maybe it’s the die, maybe it’s the lock ring, maybe it’s a combination of two of them, maybe it’s a combination of all three of them.

I love it when people throw stuff against the wall just to see what sticks without really thinking it though.
 

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Something I’ve found that helps get a good and consistent powder burn is to debur the flash holes. After the flash holes are drilled there’s always a little left over brass hanging on which can lead to an uneven ignition.

More than one company makes these mine just happens to be an RCBS. It’s as easy as putting a caliber specific collar on the shaft, insert it in the case mouth and spinning it the same way one would on a primer pocket.

The debris on the white paper is brass shaving from 12 pieces of brass.
Do you run a drill bit through the flash holes to make sure each one is the same diameter? I have noticed on a lot of 9mm and 45acp brass the flash hole diameter varies a lot in diameter. Some of the different 223 brass seems to have varying diameter flash holes too. I would think the same size flash hole would lead to more consistent ignition.
 

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Discussion Starter #70
bubba, that’s something I haven’t done yet but plan on it. You correct though, inconsistent primer holes will definitely effect the powder ignition from one round to the next putting your MV’s all over the place.

My plan is, after I shoot all my loads for a caliber is to knock all the primer out and take a drill bit, ( probably drill bits) and find which case has the largest hole and then punch the rest of them out to that size. The reason I haven’t done it yet is because it’s gonna be time consuming and boring.
 

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bubba, that’s something I haven’t done yet but plan on it. You correct though, inconsistent primer holes will definitely effect the powder ignition from one round to the next putting your MV’s all over the place.

My plan is, after I shoot all my loads for a caliber is to knock all the primer out and take a drill bit, ( probably drill bits) and find which case has the largest hole and then punch the rest of them out to that size. The reason I haven’t done it yet is because it’s gonna be time consuming and boring.
Did some research on Google and it seems that .082 is the size a lot of folks use for rifle brass. Next group of 223 that I load I am going to drill and deburr the flash holes plus weigh the brass and see how they turn out compared to a group not drilled or weighed.
 

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Discussion Starter #72
Did some research on Google and it seems that .082 is the size a lot of folks use for rifle brass. Next group of 223 that I load I am going to drill and deburr the flash holes plus weigh the brass and see how they turn out compared to a group not drilled or weighed.
Thanks for the bit size tip bubba. I’m thinking if you’re gonna start uniforming the flash holes and weighing brass it’s a good time to throw annealing into the mix, (if you don’t already do it). If you have a pipe sweater torch, cordless drill and some deep well scockets you’re good to go. It’s a relatively simple process.
 

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Discussion Starter #74
Mark, an article about primer flash holes for what it is worth. A lot of articles pro and con on the internet about flash holes and making them uniform.
Good read bubba, it has me rethinking that idea, maybe I’ll just stick with deburring the flash holes. That has helped lowered my SD and ES.

I was over on accurateshooter today, I forgot all about the thread for 22-250 load data. If your interested it’s under the “Small stuff” sub forum. There probably 5 pages of loads that work for other members. None I would consider hot though.
 

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Buy three books. Hornady reloading, Lyman and Nosler. Read, read and read some more. Watch vids on the step by step process. I load 6.5 Creedmoor and Grendel on a forster co-axe and everything else on a 650XL dillon.
Ask me questions and I'll try to answer. If it's a violation here, I'll give you my email address.
Reloading has been a blast. Has improved my groups and give you a little tap of joy knowing you did all the calculations required. Hell this might be a violation and if it is, it's all on me. Have been off the channel for a long time so I guess getting kicked off would be about my luck. Ha
 

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Discussion Starter #76
.243 to 6.5 CM

This is geared more for the experienced loaders, but the new guys could use it too.

I've found what I believe is the easiest way to make your own 6.5 CM cases using a spent .243 cartridge.

First I take a .243 case and anneal it, (it's a good practice whenever one is necking up or necking down because the brass is getting worked pretty hard). Next trim the case down to 1.920", lube it and run it through your 6.5 F/L die. When you remove your case it will measure 1.910", which is what most use for a trim-to length. I trim mine to 1.925", so they come out at 1.915". If you like your cases at max length trim them to 1.930". Yes, you loose .010" in this process.

I know someone will say they can accomplish the same thing by necking down a .308, and yes, this is true. But when necking down you are going to have to add one more step and have one more tool on hand to do it. You will have to turn your necks because the brass will flow and thicken the case neck. The upside to using the .243 is there is no neck turning involved, just trim it and run it through your press.

So if you're a 6.5 guy and have some .243 brass laying around that you can't or won't use anymore, you can still put it to good use.
 

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Discussion Starter #77
Case Charging

Just a little something on how I charge bottleneck cases. This is something I think will help the new guys maybe the seasoned guys too.

Once I’m ready to start dropping powder I take all the cares and place them neck down in the loading block. Once I’m ready to drop I flip one over and charge it. I leave the funnel on the charged case until I’m weighed out and ready to charge the next. I flip another case, charge and leave the funnel.

Realistically the chances of double charging a rifle case are next to none, but doing it like this sure eliminate the possibility of having to clean up a mess.......
 

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Discussion Starter #78
Neck tension and bushing dies

It would seem that some folks think that just because they switch to a bushing die that they are getting consistent neck tension whether it’s a bushing that delivers .001, .002, or .003 of neck tension. The amount of neck tension on any given round is the sum of many factors, neck reduction during resizing is just one. Knowing what some of the factors are should help you maintain a more consistent neck tension as your brass ages after multiple firing.

The size of the bushing isn’t the beginning and the end of neck tension even when the bushing size remains the same. The amount of bullet grip or tension can and will change as the condition of your brass changes.

Here are a few things that can effect neck tension;

1) How often you anneal your brass.

2) The springiness of your brass, degree of work-hardening, number of firings, (number 1 will help with that).

3) The length of time between sizing and seating, also the length of time between seating and firing.

4) The surface condition of the inside of the neck, carbon can act as a lubricant, ultrasonic cleaning make necks “grabby”, (that’s why I don’t).

5) Length of the neck.

6) Neck-wall thickness

7) The amount of bearing surface, (shank) in the neck.

8) Whether or not the bullets have any anti-friction coating on them.

9) The jacket material of the bullet.

10) The outside diameter of the bullet, (yeah they’re supposed to be the same but.....).

11) Changing the seating depth of your bullet, (more or less bearing surface in the neck).

Do I think bushing dies are better standard? Yes I do, as long as one factors in everything else and monitors it. Expander balls have known to pull on the neck as the shell is on its way back out which can really effect the concentricity. An easy fix, (or at least help) for that is to polish the expander with some 0000 steel wool.

I run both types of dies, but I find as long as I pay attention to the things listed above I can maintain an extremely low SD and ES.
 

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Discussion Starter #79
A buddy of mine called the other day with a problem. He just got into loading for the 6.5 Creed, so I guess he figured since I load for it too I’d have “the” answer, (doubtful).

He was attempting to load once fire factory offerings from Hornady. His problem was seating the primers, they felt tight going in, (always good, right?) but they weren’t fully seated. They looked good to the naked eye but they didn’t pass the “flat surface” test. I told him to check his Decapping Rod, its probably set to deep. He called back a little later and said it was indeed to deep.

If your Decapping Rod is adjusted to low the base of the rods full diameter just above the pin will come in contact with the inside of the case. The rod is steel and the case is much softer so it can stretch the base of the primer pocket outward. Let face it, you can create enough leverage to do this on the cheapest of presses. If you bell your primer pocket you have basically ruined your case. You will never get a primer to seat correctly again ......and there is no “fix”.

There are probably a thousand ways to set up your decapper. I generally start with a 1/4” exposed and run a case up, back it out, screw the decapper down a tad and repeat. I’ll do this until the primer drops, when it drops I’m done.

You should also recheck ALL your dies if you switch to another press.
 

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Discussion Starter #80
A new box of bullets

So I was putting together some Creedmoor loaded today and got into a new box of 140 ELD-M’s. AFTER I was done I was checking the CBTO number......they were all set .002” deeper. Then it dawned me.......I didn’t check the first one as I normally do when I get into a new box, I assumed it was on.

This had zero to do with the die, it had everything to do with the fresh box of 140’s. If you’re measuring off the tip there’s no need to check, if you’re seating off the ogive give it a check. Granted .002 isn’t much but it is enough impact your POI at longer distances and throw off your firing solutions.
 
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