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"The Real Deal"
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Here is my primed supply waiting to be loaded rifle on left, pistol on right.
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I have a lot of brass always ready to load, but I leave them unprimed. I have plenty but as you never know how long a shortage will last, I don’t ever want anything tied up until I am ready to use it. That way I don’t have a bunch of say 9mm primed and need a batch of .39 special or have most of my small rifle tied up in .223 but want to load some blackout. It’s also easier to see what I have in inventory. But whatever works for each of us.
 

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Discussion Starter #143
i process my brass, size it, trim it, seat the primers so they are ready to be loaded when i feel like it.
Jason, you should do a little research on what happens to a sized piece of brass as it sits waiting to be loaded. Neck tension is increased which is evident in the amount of force it takes to seat the bullet. This in itself can lead to run-out. Maybe not a big to most but it can effect your down range performance. I’m specifically talking about rifle not pistol.
 
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"The Real Deal"
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Jason, you should do a little research on what happens to a sized piece of brass as it sits waiting to be loaded. Neck tension is increased which is evident in the amount of force it takes to seat the bullet. This in itself can lead to run-out. Maybe not a big to most but it can effect your down range performance. I’m specifically talking about rifle not pistol.
Never thought of that but your right. In any case the brass is checked again before loading, just my OCD. That brass wont sit long anyways, you know i like shooting. 👌
 

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Never thought of that but your right. In any case the brass is checked again before loading, just my OCD. That brass wont sit long anyways, you know i like shooting. 👌
and maintaining a healthy supply ... 👀
 
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I have started to amass all the equipment to reload. Just about ready to start. Been reading and studying.
Have cleaned some brass (9mm) with a RCBS Sonic Cleaner using 50/50 mix of vinegar and Distilled water. Finding some of the cases have a pinkish tint to them. With a little elbow grease I can polish it away. I assume this is the vinegar reacting to the brass. What are the pit falls in the long run of cleaning brass this way?
 

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I have started to amass all the equipment to reload. Just about ready to start. Been reading and studying.
Have cleaned some brass (9mm) with a RCBS Sonic Cleaner using 50/50 mix of vinegar and Distilled water. Finding some of the cases have a pinkish tint to them. With a little elbow grease I can polish it away. I assume this is the vinegar reacting to the brass. What are the pit falls in the long run of cleaning brass this way?
No real pitfall, i have friends that toss them into the tumbler for a bit to polish up the brass after the sonic cleaner. Myself i just use the tumblers with treated tuffnut (lyman) so no need to sonic clean.
 
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I had a friend that was having a problem last night and called and asked me my thoughts, i decided to share. He was loading 45 long colt and his bullets were easily pushed back into the casing by hand. He could not figure out why.

So after some questions i found out he was using new brass and did not size them first. I told him i always size new brass since you do not know if the case was sized at the beginning, middle , or end of the production run, and could be loose or tight. I always size mine to make sure they are all the same. Then i trim, chamfer, debur if needed. However its been a long time since i bought new brass, i have had no need to because of my supply i have.

So if you buy new brass, remember to size it just the same as you do your others. will save you a few headaches. Just because its new doesn't mean its perfect.
 

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Keep powder from getting mixed: This is a no brainer. I have two Dillon's set up plus a RCBS RC press. On citizen made a suggestion that was embarrassingly simple. He would put a piece of paper with powder ID in to the measure.. Paper would rest on top of the power, Problem went away here, Tape on the outside with written ID sucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #151
He would put a piece of paper with powder ID in to the measure.. Paper would rest on top of the power,
I’ve been doing that years.....multiple powder hoppers for multiple calibers on my Dillon. Albeit I don’t leave powder in them when not in use, I do include the charge weight for a given caliber......
 

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For me it's good with one hopper full.
I’ve been doing that years.....multiple powder hoppers for multiple calibers on my Dillon. Albeit I don’t leave powder in them when not in use, I do include the charge weight for a given caliber......
Here, It works for me with one hopper full. It's a good practice for me to have 24/7.
 

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I only have one powder on the bench at a time when loading. I have no need for 2, can only load one at a time anyways. When done, it gets stored.
 

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I only have one powder on the bench at a time when loading. I have no need for 2, can only load one at a time anyways. When done, it gets stored.
This slip of paper trick works great for us that may have more than one loader going. Also, helps from accidentally pouring powder into the wrong container. I think it's a good tip.
 

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This slip of paper trick works great for us that may have more than one loader going. Also, helps from accidentally pouring powder into the wrong container. I think it's a good tip.
Yeah i agree. I just only do one caliber loading at a time, im totally focosed on just the load at hand and being anal about it. 😉
 

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Yeah i agree. I just only do one caliber loading at a time, im totally focosed on just the load at hand and being anal about it. 😉
That's great that we do it our way, I suppose if we were all of the same mind we'd stll be pounding away with a mallet on the old Lee loaders. The 550'a are set up and run one at a time. The powder is marked with the paper tag. No container of powder is left on the bench. One makes long runs loading one caliber at the time. Move to the other press when it's time to swap over. I got a Master Caster the feed this set up. Marking the powder in the measure is a conservative safety step for anybody,
 

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I’m not a reloader but interested in it. What’s the best book or site to get started? Was told to start with a single stage press, what would be the best press to start out with? If/when I do get started, I have a bunch of .357 brass, my buddy has a lot of .45acp & 9mm brass; that would be my primary interest in reloading. I’ve heard on the .45acp that there are small & large primer cases & the large primer cases are ideal for reloading. Can the small primer .45acp cases be reloaded or is it a waste of time?


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I’m not a reloader but interested in it. What’s the best book or site to get started? Was told to start with a single stage press, what would be the best press to start out with? If/when I do get started, I have a bunch of .357 brass, my buddy has a lot of .45acp & 9mm brass; that would be my primary interest in reloading. I’ve heard on the .45acp that there are small & large primer cases & the large primer cases are ideal for reloading. Can the small primer .45acp cases be reloaded or is it a waste of time?


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There are starter kits available from RCBS, Hornady, & Lee; any of them will serve your purpose.
Since you have an abundance of 357 brass, I'd start with them. The 357 is an easy round to learn on, very forgiving.
There is a great deal of data on it and normally, an abundance of components.
As far as books go, most reloading manuals have detailed instructions on press set up, procedures, etc., and a starter kit will come with a manual.
Additionally, Lyman makes a great manual and is, in fact , my go to.
I see no reason why small primer 45 brass can't be reloaded , however, if
small primers are the exception rather than the rule you may experience problems locating data for them.
I don't know
In any event, best of luck on your reloading efforts. I've been reloading for about ten years now and really enjoy it.
GH1😀
 

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I’m not a reloader but interested in it. What’s the best book or site to get started? Was told to start with a single stage press, what would be the best press to start out with? If/when I do get started, I have a bunch of .357 brass, my buddy has a lot of .45acp & 9mm brass; that would be my primary interest in reloading. I’ve heard on the .45acp that there are small & large primer cases & the large primer cases are ideal for reloading. Can the small primer .45acp cases be reloaded or is it a waste of time?


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Hello Eshooter, I will give you my advice on the subject, other members will be able to help you too. A couple of books that I would recommend are NRA Guide to Reloading and Cartridge Reloading in the Twenty First Century but there are many more out there. Something else that I would recommend is to get yourself some reloading manuals from bullet and powder manufactures. They often have some great advice in them and you will need to refer to them for load data. For a press, a lot of what type, single stage, turret, or progressive, will depend on how you plan to reload. You will have a better understanding after you have read up on the subject. As far as what cartridge to start with, personally I would start with .38 special and .357 mag. These are great to learn on. They are straight walled cases, lots of data on them, and most die sets will reload both cartridges. I can tell you that I have been reloading for years and I continue to learn about the subject.

Anyway, have fun, stay safe, and burn some powder every chance you get. Best aroma therapy there is.
 

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How often do you change the media in the tumbler? I have ran about several batches of brass through the tumbler and added some additional media.
 
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