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My Dad died in 1979 (age 57) when I was 31. I could have seen him a couple of weeks before he died of a heart attack down in Dallas one weekend. My father in law passed of a heart attack in 2005 (age 90) and I had not seen him in a month as I was working in Ohio at the time. I still miss them both and think of them often. Dad was a quail and dove hunter and loved to fish in the lake near our home and down in the Gulf near Port Aransas and Rock Port. We spent a lot of time hunting and fishing when I was growing up. My father in law was a deer hunter but hunted **** with hounds and just about anything else when he was a younger man. We hunted white tail together for 30 years before he began to suffer from dementia and heart problems and I was working farther and farther from home all the time. We never know when they will leave us so love them and enjoy being with them all you can, especially as they grow older.
 

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RMichael ... No Shame in that Dust in Your Eyes .... I Watered Up just reading your thread ... Why ?? Because I lost my Father when I was a young man of 21 and now an old man of 55 ... I Still to this day Water Up ... I inherited all my Father's reloading equipment and still using it to this day . I had a lot of opportunities to buy a new press and even a Dillon but I just can't bring myself to doing it and I won't either No matter what because every time I pull that lever down I remember him saying " There's Another Round to Shoot " So Don't Worry About That Dust ....

Best Thread I Have Ever Read ....

Thanks
 

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Life is bittersweet that way. Be thankful for every moment you two get. My dad, who passed in 2002, and I never shared a hobby, aside from a love of travel. So when I go places we went together, I remember him.

My father-in-law taught me how to use farm and earth-moving equipment, for which I am forever grateful. I own and work three of his old tractors, some more than 70years old. They will go to family when I pass.
My Dad had a vintage Ford 9N with a Model A 4 cyl engine. That thing ran as quiet as a sewing machine! It was completely restored to it's original paint scheme.
 

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My Dad had a vintage Ford 9N with a Model A 4 cyl engine. That thing ran as quiet as a sewing machine! It was completely restored to it's original paint scheme.
We have a 1952 8N on our farm, a machine that my in-laws got to teach us how to operate a tractor. I use it to bush hog rather frequently. It is in good shape but is not babied.

what would otherwise just be ”Stuff” has value, like the OP’s reloading supplies, when you use it and think about those who had it before.
 

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Sir ... it would be a blessing to shoot one more time with him. But his pride won't let him be fussed over in public. The ranges I go to are all wheelchair accessible but he would never permit us to take him.
You would have to tell him your not making a fuss over him. You are just doing what is needed to get him to the range. Tell him it's a go-cart not a wheelchair.
 

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Sorry to hear about your dad health issue. what he gave you is more of a reloading stuff, it's treasure. hopefully you value it and bring out the brightest smile while using it
I won't go into the gory details, but visiting my parents today I got talking with my dad about reloading. He taught me what I know. He got me into firearms. Unfortunately, health issues have robbed him of his ability to do things for himself. So talking with him he told me to take some reloading supplies that he will never ever get to use. He even told me to take his reloaded ammo that he did a few years ago. I offered him money for everything he was giving but would have none of that. So, I'll use these supplies with a smile and shoot his reloads with a even bigger smile knowing mine will never be as good as his. Now I'm getting this damn dust in my eyes so I had better just stop while I'm ahead. View attachment 153012
 

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My dad never showed any interest in shooting, probably the last time he had shot anything was before he was himself shot and captured during his 'walking tour of Europe' in 1944 so we did not have that in common.
More similar to rmicael63's situation was my college room mate and best friend of 40 years who passed from cancer about 5 years ago. I have a number of his guns here, including ones that we shot together in the 70s. Ironically, what gives me pause is whether or not to shoot some ammo that we loaded back then. Each time I think about it I look at the label in his hand writing and decide to leave it. Shooting the Winchester 71 that it fits hasn't bothered me, just those rounds he loaded so long ago.

Bruce
 

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When I was a little kid, my father was a reserve police officer, and eventually, captain of a reserve force of about 20 men, most of them, including my dad, were Korean War vets. He took me to the basement range at the police station once. That was my introduction to firearms. I also went with him to a police supply shop in the the Bronx, NY, where he bought a Colt .38 Detective Special; a "snubby." Those were the days of "Fort Apache, the Bronx." For real. A snubby was not exactly your typical patrolman's duty weapon, but, that's what he liked. Well after retirement from his regular work, he bought a S&W .357 Magnum revolver. That thing was a hand cannon.

My father passed in 2011, just shy of his 81st birthday. I still have his pistol cleaning kit; a vintage item, in a metal case. During his retirement, after sessions at the range, he and I would sit at my mom's kitchen table, with old newspaper spread out, cleaning our guns and making wisecracks about our "shootin' irons," talking like old geezers from a Hollywood western movie. By then, I had my own handgun (now plural). I also still have a half-full box of .38 ammo that belonged to him, but, I don't own any .38s.
 

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At least you learned from Dad while he was still able. I didn't. I've got all the equipment, and it collects dust.
 
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This whole thread puts dust in my eyes, but has great therapeutic value. I'll be leaving in about an hour for one of my twice-a-week visits to my 88 year-old parents. Dad is a USMC Korean war combat vet who just started using a walker. In his better years he was an avid hunter and taught me everything I know about firearms. One of my most cherished possessions is the Winchester model 250 lever action .22 he bought me in the '60's. To finally return the favor, I bought him an M1 Garand through the CMP last year. The folks there did a great job in finding me one in the right serial number range corresponding to a weapon that might have been on the ground in Korea during same time he was. You should have seen the look on his face when he was reunited with his old friend. We went to the range and he shot well and taught me all the tricks to avoid the "M1 thumb"! One of the greatest days of my life.
 

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Lost my Dad in 2009 at age 84.
He was a WWII Marine and when I was growing up, to me he was 10 feet tall and bullet-proof. He could fix anything.
He was not a shooter, but was a hardcore freshwater fisherman. He taught me the love of the outdoors, and that no matter what, every outing is an adventure. Even if something breaks, or you have a flat tire, etc, it's part of the adventure.

I live surrounded by water and spend a lot of time fishing - and always still think of my Dad. Be thankful for every adventure.
 

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My Dad passed away at 86, back in 1993. He taught me everything about hunting, fishing, camping boating. Although he had a Remington Model 11, he never did much shooting except for hunting, and the occasional Trap shoot/turkey shoot, which he always seemed to win with that relic Model 11, and was proud to bring home the ham or whatever it was that he won. He never got into reloading, that I got into in my late teens, and always seemed somewhat skeptical of my new found abilities. Fishing was also one of his expert like trades, fresh water that is, rarely did we ever come home empty handed, and man could he handle a 16' Fishing vessel, with a 25 HP Evenrude out in to Lake Michigan, even in the stormy waters that we always seemed to encounter. I eventually went into the Marine Corps, and hence went to Vietnam, against my parents wishes, but I remember my return home and the joyous reception we as a family all had. Naturally we went hunting partridge, and my Dad was just as good a shot as I remembered him, even though he missed a shot or two, which he blamed on his "Getting Old", which was the first time I realized he wasn't kidding. I shortly, after my return, I moved out to California, got married and settled down as a Police Officer. My Mom and Dad came out to visit us a couple of times, and oh yeah, my Dad and I went hunting quail, and fishing for Striper in Lake Mohave. I can still see the smile on my Dad's face, as he worked to bring in a 10# Striper, and later advised me, those fish definitely out fight the Northern Pike. Not only that, hunting for quail with my German Shorthair Pointer was a thrill he never had before.(he always had Spaniels, and beagles) So to make a long story short, I felt that I was able to repay my Dad for the many great memories he afforded me as I grew up. It wasn't too many years after that, my Dad began suffering from dementia. Being as I was the only surviving son, I returned home and he gave me that Remington Model 11, to which I will pass on to one of my sons, when the time comes.
 

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I won't go into the gory details, but visiting my parents today I got talking with my dad about reloading. He taught me what I know. He got me into firearms. Unfortunately, health issues have robbed him of his ability to do things for himself. So talking with him he told me to take some reloading supplies that he will never ever get to use. He even told me to take his reloaded ammo that he did a few years ago. I offered him money for everything he was giving but would have none of that. So, I'll use these supplies with a smile and shoot his reloads with a even bigger smile knowing mine will never be as good as his. Now I'm getting this damn dust in my eyes so I had better just stop while I'm ahead. View attachment 153012
God Bless Dads like Yours. I had and Lost Mine, decades ago(I'm now 68). Funny thing was My Dad took up handgun hunting after I introduced Him to it, but He Dove in and even got Me into Bullet casting.
God Bless such Great Dads !!!
 

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Hey Guys
I'm 74 in age but think I'm 40 , I'm at the age , when ever that phone rings at a strange time I get that bad feeling . Happened Tuesday , my 33 year old cousin committed suicide , just a kid and I thought he had the hole world ahead of him. A great age , you never know. At my age I still love shooting , my eyes aren't as sharp even with glasses , hands aren't as steady . I build handgun rests to shoot with , adds to the fun. Life goes on even being heavy hearted. Be Well , enjoy every day to the fullest.
Chris
 

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Hey Guys
I'm 74 in age but think I'm 40 , I'm at the age , when ever that phone rings at a strange time I get that bad feeling . Happened Tuesday , my 33 year old cousin committed suicide , just a kid and I thought he had the hole world ahead of him. A great age , you never know. At my age I still love shooting , my eyes aren't as sharp even with glasses , hands aren't as steady . I build handgun rests to shoot with , adds to the fun. Life goes on even being heavy hearted. Be Well , enjoy every day to the fullest.
Chris
Chris ... sorry to hear about your cousin, prayers for his family and you.

You are right we are not promised tomorrow we are only given the rest of today ...
 
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