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Discussion Starter #1
First let me say I'm completely new to firearms including cleaning them. Just thought I'd share a tip I did to my bronze brush. I'm not sure if it's necessary but I had them laying around so I figured I'd try it out.

I just bought a 22 piece Winchester cleaning kit from Walmart.


The bronze brushes have an exposed piece of the steel wire sticking out of the top. Just thought it had the potential to scratch the barrel if it went in at the wrong angle or brushed too aggressively.


So I had these laying around that you can get at an auto parts store.


So basically just found the one that fit and cut it down a bit to fit snug on the brush tip.


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Didn't budge while cleaning and didn't worry about scratching anything with that steel tip. Hope it helps but like I said not sure if it's necessary.
 

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I use Pro-Shot brand which doesn't have that steel core. Instead it has a brass core.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It was a cheap set so I didn't expect great brushes. But they will work for now until I can get something better. I think it should hold up. I had to do the same thing to one of my wheel brushes for my car to avoid scratching up my summer wheels. That one has been doing fine so far.
 

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Nice idea!


Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks guys.

Quick question. Do you guys clean your bronze brushes when your done? If so how?
 

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Thanks guys.

Quick question. Do you guys clean your bronze brushes when your done? If so how?
Yes. I wrap the rag I am using on the gun around the brush. Naturally, you can't drag the brush over the rag because it invariably snags, but merely wrapping the rag around the brush removes a surprising amount of carbon from the tips of the bristles; which, after all, are the only contact point with the gun anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yes. I wrap the rag I am using on the gun around the brush. Naturally, you can't drag the brush over the rag because it invariably snags, but merely wrapping the rag around the brush removes a surprising amount of carbon from the tips of the bristles; which, after all, are the only contact point with the gun anyway.
Thanks. I'll try that next time.
 

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G35, The tip protectors won't hurt anything but they really don't have a valid function. Assuming you use the proper size bore brush, the steel wire tip will NEVER touch the bore.

Here's some other "tips" for bore brushes:

1. Always use a caliber specific bore brush. It's the tips of the bristles that do the scrubbing so if you use a bore brush that is larger than the bore (ie 40 cal brush in a 357 bore) the bristles will fold, will not scrub well, and can damage a bore.

2. Bronze bore brushes are the best for normal cleaning.

3. Never use stainless steel bore brushes in any gun you intend to keep ... they will scratch the bore.

4. Use Nylon bore brushes if you use jacket fouling solvents such as Sweet's 7.62. Any solvent that will dissolve jacket fouling will literally eat the bristles off a bronze brush. Further, Sweet's and some other solvents contain dye that will turn a cloth patch blue if jacket fouling is present. If you use a bronze bore brush, you will always get blue patches ... not necessarily from the bore but from the brush itself.

5. Bore brushes are cheap ... about 2 bucks each. When they wear to a point where they don't fit snug in the bore or appear to be off center, it's time to toss them in the trash. That said, if you take care of your bore brushes, they will last for many years.

6. Keep your bore brushes clean. If they get cruddy, you will be adding abrasive fouling, not removing it. Because most bore brushes have dissimilar metals (bronze bristles, steel wire) any cleaner that is acidic will cause galvanic action and will ruin the brush. Mix up a little water and Dawn dish washing detergent and soak the brushes up to an hour. Drop the brush on a hard surface to get rid of excess water and detergent then allow the brush to air dry before using it again.

7. NEVER reverse direction while the bore brush is inside the bore. This will ruin the bore brush and may even damage the bore. ALWAYS run the bore brush all the way through the bore until it is fully disengaged.

8. When possible, bore brushes should be "pulled" through the bore ... not pushed through the bore. This will prevent the cleaning rod from flexing and rubbing against the bore. With some guns, this is not as easy as with others so you may have to run the cleaning rod all the way through then screw on the bore brush. It's always best to use a "bore guide" on the muzzle end. A bore guide is a tapered device ... looks like a cartridge with a hole in the center that fits snug on the cleaning rod and the tapered cone end centers on the bore. A bore guide does two things ... it prevents the cleaning rod from touching the muzzle crown and more importantly, it keep the bore brush centered in the bore. This will make bore brushes last much longer and will virtually eliminate bore damage caused by the rod touching the bore.

You can "push" a bore brush thorough the bore if you use a thicker cleaning rod that doesn't flex and of course use a bore guide. For my centerfire revolvers, lever action rifles, and other guns where I cant' access the breech end of the barrel easily, I use a solid brass 1/4" diameter cleaning rod ... very stiff ... no flex at all and I clean from the muzzle end and use a bore guide. Where you may have problems is when you use a wimpy 22 cal cleaning rod (13/64") in a large bore. When the rod is pushed, the friction from the bore brush will cause the rod to flex and rub against the bore, which can cause bore damage.

I make my own cleaning rods from solid brass rod stock. I use 13/64" rods for 22 cal, 7/32" for 24 & 25 cal, and 1/4" for all larger calibers. Most of my bronze bore brushes are several years old and are still in excellent condition, however I don't hesitate to toss one if it gets worn. I do clean my bore brushes after each use so I don't contaminate the next bore I clean. Another suggestion is to use a cleaning rod with a free spin handle. This will help prevent the bore brush from unscrewing as rifling twists the brush.
 

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***
Here's some other "tips" for bore brushes:

1. Always use a caliber specific bore brush. It's the tips of the bristles that do the scrubbing so if you use a bore brush that is larger than the bore (ie 40 cal brush in a 357 bore) the bristles will fold, will not scrub well, and can damage a bore.

***
I have religiously followed this rule. However, I have been entertaining the idea of getting a .40 brush for the cylinder of my .38/.357 GP100. The 9mm brushes I have been using just appear to pass thru the cylinder with a lack of resistance which makes me wonder if it is doing anything worthwhile. Think this is a mistake? :confused:
 

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Well, theoretically a 9mm brush would be smaller than a .38/.357 brush.

I dunno if this is true in the real world, but that's what the numbers would indicate.

:)
 

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Ale-8(1), 9mm, 38 Spec, and 357 Mag all use the same sized bore brush ... just .002" difference in diameter. 40 cal and 41 cal also share the same brush. Pistol bore brushes are shorter than rifle bore brushes and to the best of my knowledge, here's the only sizes available: 22 cal (for .222 or .224" bores), 25 cal, 32 cal, 9mm/38/357, 40/41 cal, 44 cal, and 45 cal. This covers virtually all handguns.

For rifles: 17 cal (also works with handguns), 22 cal, 6mm/243 cal, 6.5mm/257 cal, 270 cal, 7mm/264 cal, 8mm/308 cal, 338 cal, 375 cal, 416 cal, and 45 cal.

With exception of 17 cal, all other rifle and pistol bore brushes have 8x32 threads. 17 cal requires a thinner cleaning rod (5/32") and have 5x40 threads.

sailmotion,
......idea of getting a .40 brush for the cylinder of my .38/.357 GP100
Many people do this, however 40 cal brushes are really about .412", which would make the bristles fold in a .380" chamber, thus ruining the brush for 40 or 41 cal purposes. Further, it would violate "rule 7" .... NEVER reverse direction while the bore brush is inside the bore (or chamber in this case). If you run a 40 cal brush through the cylinder throats (typically .357~.358") it will really ruin it.

It's rare to see a chamber in any revolver cylinder or pistol get gunked up with residue to a point where a snug fitting bore brush is even needed. The throats do get dirty but a standard 38 cal bore brush will work just fine. If you shoot 38 Specials in a 357 Mag chamber and get the "dreaded crud ring", a bore brush (even a 40 cal) won't do a good job. What I do .... cut a piece of green 3-M pad and wrap it around an old 22 cal bore brush. Hose the chamber with Hoppie's #9 then rotate the 3-M pad inside each chamber. It only takes a few twists to get the crud ring out and green 3-M pads are not abrasive enough to damage the chamber ... in fact they polish it.

I even make special cleaning rods for cylinders that have a 3" shaft. Works much better than trying to manipulate a long 8~10"pistol cleaning rod.
 
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