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New to rifle shooting can use info on how to correctly use a rifle rest, its a rock jr. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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Get the idea? :D
 

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1) Get a better rest.

The Rock Jr. is a minimalist rest, no features, lots of slack and backlash - overall really poor quality rest. A sandbag or a bipod is actually a much more solid and repeatable front support than the Rock Jr.

2) If you're stubborn and insist on employing the Rock Jr. then at least get a better bag on it. I like Edgewood and Protektor bags. Get the appropriate bag for your forend type - but recognize that the bag needs to be treated, and round sporter forends often do not benefit from a front rest very much (without a bag rider installed).

So then a few easy tips for using a machine rest:

A) Elevation: Fix the height to get yourself comfortable over the rifle, then lock the height. Make your fine elevation adjustments from there on out using your rear bag. If you're using a bunny ear rear bag, shim beneath it to get the elevation close. If you're using a squeeze tube, make sure you don't have contact with your hand on the stock to pulse the rifle.

B) Windage: Set your windage aim by re-positioning the rest. For comfort and physical reach, the rear bag won't be able to move much without taking you out of proper shooting position, so anchor your rear bag position on the bench and don't move it. Move the rest to bring you in line with the target. Be sure also that you don't induce torque on the rifle by misaligning the rest from the recoil line of the rifle - the head and bag should be perpendicular to the rifle, otherwise it'll want to jump one direction or the other upon recoil. The easy way to confirm this is by ensuring the rear support leg is in line with your rifle.

C) Place the rifle on the front rest near the tip of the forend, but not so far that it'll slip off when it recoils - and be wary of your swivel stud. Most often, this would put the front swivel stud in the middle of your bag - remove the stud, or better yet, use the old stud hole to install a bag rider. EDIT: Check out gunna1day's picture - that's a badly positioned front rest. That swivel stud is going to hit the rest when it recoils, giving an errant jump to the muzzle and likely damaging the bag.

D) Don't cheek the rifle too much. Laying on the rifle is an expression.

E) Let the rifle track on the bags freely. Unless you're shooting a 3,000ft.lbs.+ cartridge, you'll likely shoot your best Free-Recoil. Shooting with a pad isn't just for girls - pain free practice is productive practice.

F) Open the bolt and let it breathe. Don't string your shots together and let your barrel heat up. The only reason to do so is when you're colony varminting or shooting quickly through a stable wind condition during a competition. Nobody has time to come clear back down to a cold bore, but try not to string shots together - not more than one shot every 2 min. Relax on the line, open your bolt, let the heat escape both ends of the bore, re-read your range card, write another line of a letter to a friend - whatever you want to do to keep yourself from getting impatient and shooting again too soon.

G) Sit more upright than you'd naturally expect. Guys complain about recoil over the bench because they set themselves up to take the full hit of the recoil - which isn't necessary. The lower your bench or higher your seat, the more you'll be "laying" at the bench instead of sitting. The more upright your torso, the more you'll be able to move with recoil instead of taking the full hit as if you were laying prone.

H) Put the rifle more in front of you than you'd naturally expect. Guys often tend to have a bad habit of turning nearly sideways to the target when they shoot over a bench, which twists your body, takes the trigger away from your hand, brings the scope closer to your face, and puts you in an overall un-natural position. Your shoulders should be closer to parallel to the firing line than perpendicular. Remembering to position the rifle in front of you on the bench instead of beside you will help mitigate that habit in your initial set up. (If your target were alive, it should be able to read your t-shirt when you get over the rifle).

There's a lot more to it than that, but those will get you started.
 

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I like the rock jr, got so used to using it I sold my lead sled. But then again, I prefer the butt of the gun against my shoulder.
 

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I've used bags and a bipod but both were tough to make adjustments without moving the gun around. I recently picked up a Caldwell rest at 40% off but haven't had a chance to try it out yet and might only be able to use the front half this winter at the indoor ranges and get the whole thing out to the range come spring before the 3Gun starts up again.
 

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Since there's not much traffic happening to the point of the question - I don't feel quite as bad for taking time to elaborate on my comments about the Rock Jr. I'm sure lots of guys are happy with theirs, just like lots of guys think their V8 bone stock Ford Mustang goes really fast - if you've never experienced a proper machine rest, you don't realize the short comings of the Rock Jr.

The Rock Jr. is aptly named - as a front rest, it's about as useful as a rock (which isn't as bad as it sounds, but it's not good either). At least it's an adjustable rock.

How is it like a rock? Well, it's kinda wobbly, since the machining precision on the elevator isn't very tight, just like an oddly shaped rock might be. That poor machining precision also means the adjustment has a lot of slack and backlash, so adjusting it is much like picking from a couple of different sized rocks, or rolling an oddly shaped rock from one side to the next to find the proper height you need.

BUT... If a guy treats it like a rock - meaning you get it set up (find the right size of rock), don't make any more adjustments, and you move the entire rest and manipulate the rear bag to get on target, AND you're ok with it jumping on the bench and ok with the headpiece rocking in the elevator slack on the shot, then it'll work relatively well.

Is it better than a Lead Sled? Sure - the Lead Sled has all of the same poor machining fit, AND it doesn't let you get over your rifle comfortably.

Is it better than the Rock BR? The Rock BR does seem to have less lash in the elevator (haven't figured out why yet), but the windage adjustment on the head is useless, so it's basically a less wobbly, more expensive, heavier Rock Jr. The added stability is worth the price difference.

Is it better than other "rests" in its price class? Eh - probably so, but only if you prep your front bag properly. The cheap MTM plastic rest and the lightweight Hi-Skore and CTK rests in its price class don't set the bar very high. At least the Rock Jr. has a cast iron base to give it the low center of gravity and inertia that a front rest should have.

Is it better than a front X bag or bipod? Nope. A preloaded bipod or a tight packed X bag can have less jump than a Rock Jr. - been there, done that. For $50, you'll be better served to tightly roll a hoodie and spend the money on ammo for practice.

Is it almost as good as a REAL machine rest? Nope. But then again, you're not buying a Sinclair rest for $50, let alone a Ransom or a custom precision rest.
 

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Yeah, I don't do a lot of forking around, I just want a steady front rest, which the rock jr provides. I have it adjusted fairly high and I adjust myself accordingly.

I would have gone with sand bags, but I didn't want to leave them outside and toting sand bags around didn't sound like much fun, even though the rest goes about 100' from my garage to my picnic table/shooting bench.

And Varminterror, even after two lengthy posts, you still didn't cover anything asked in the OP, however, to me anyways, the first reply covered the actual question.

I think all those options you mention are fine pieces of equipment, and for their intended purposes are far superior to the Rock Jr. The Rock Jr does an excellent job of helping steady the front of a rifle, much like a tree branch in the woods, it's just a little more convenient to use when I'm not in the woods. That's all
 

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How did he not answer anything in the first post? There is barely a question from the OP. As to his opinion on the Rock Jr..........I echo his thoughts. That is not much of a rest. The best bang for the buck in rests is likely the Bald Eagle
 

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Sand bags always worked well for me.
 

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can use info on how to correctly use a rifle rest, its a rock jr.
Looks to me like he's asking how to correctly use the Rock Jr.

It doesn't appear that he's asking whether it's any good or if anyone has opinions on other rests, etc. I took it to mean he has one, and just wants to know the proper way to utilize it. They say a picture is worth a thousand words, and the first reply sorta covered that....

If he does in fact own the Rock Jr. then why the need to run it down? The guy is new to rifle shooting, no need to 'snob' him away from the forum by telling him his rest is 'crap' so to speak. Now had he asked what sort of rests would anyone recommend, that opens an entire area of debate. But that's not the question that was posed.
 

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Wow..............ease up dude. He said he was new to rifle shooting..........so he saw a picture of how it works, got an in depth explanation of how to set it up, and yes, a little critique of his choice of rests. It was by no means an attempt to "snob" him away, as you put it. Merely giving him some information, so that if he doesn't get the performance or ease of use that he desires, he might want to look at a "better" rest, because, as pointed out, the Rock Jr is not a very well made unit, as far as rests are concerned.
 

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lol, ease up.... ok
 

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New to rifle shooting can use info on how to correctly use a rifle rest, its a rock jr. Any help would be appreciated.
I prefer using a tree or fence post as a rest to a rock, especially a jr rock. :rolleyes:
 

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And Varminterror, even after two lengthy posts, you still didn't cover anything asked in the OP, however, to me anyways, the first reply covered the actual question.
Reading comprehension is not your strong suit, huh? I gave 8 points, A-H, in my first post on how to use a front rest, and how to shoot from a bench in general. I gave ONE point in my first message that states my opinion/experience on the quality of his choice, then gave item #2 as advice for how to improve his existing equipment, and items A-H as advice on how to use it. So you either didn't read my post before criticizing it, or if you did read it, you didn't understand it.

Frankly, those are written with the Rock Jr. in mind moreso than a proper adjustable front rest. With higher quality rests, you're able to essentially dial in your aim using the rest. With the Rock Jr, you cannot, as such items A and B in my original post reflect how to use the Rock Jr, moving the rest and manipulating the rear bag instead of aiming with the rest adjustments themselves.

2) If you're stubborn and insist on employing the Rock Jr. then at least get a better bag on it. I like Edgewood and Protektor bags. Get the appropriate bag for your forend type - but recognize that the bag needs to be treated, and round sporter forends often do not benefit from a front rest very much (without a bag rider installed).

So then a few easy tips for using a machine rest:

A) Elevation: Fix the height to get yourself comfortable over the rifle, then lock the height. Make your fine elevation adjustments from there on out using your rear bag. If you're using a bunny ear rear bag, shim beneath it to get the elevation close. If you're using a squeeze tube, make sure you don't have contact with your hand on the stock to pulse the rifle.

B) Windage: Set your windage aim by re-positioning the rest. For comfort and physical reach, the rear bag won't be able to move much without taking you out of proper shooting position, so anchor your rear bag position on the bench and don't move it. Move the rest to bring you in line with the target. Be sure also that you don't induce torque on the rifle by misaligning the rest from the recoil line of the rifle - the head and bag should be perpendicular to the rifle, otherwise it'll want to jump one direction or the other upon recoil. The easy way to confirm this is by ensuring the rear support leg is in line with your rifle.

C) Place the rifle on the front rest near the tip of the forend, but not so far that it'll slip off when it recoils - and be wary of your swivel stud. Most often, this would put the front swivel stud in the middle of your bag - remove the stud, or better yet, use the old stud hole to install a bag rider. EDIT: Check out gunna1day's picture - that's a badly positioned front rest. That swivel stud is going to hit the rest when it recoils, giving an errant jump to the muzzle and likely damaging the bag.

D) Don't cheek the rifle too much. Laying on the rifle is an expression.

E) Let the rifle track on the bags freely. Unless you're shooting a 3,000ft.lbs.+ cartridge, you'll likely shoot your best Free-Recoil. Shooting with a pad isn't just for girls - pain free practice is productive practice.

F) Open the bolt and let it breathe. Don't string your shots together and let your barrel heat up. The only reason to do so is when you're colony varminting or shooting quickly through a stable wind condition during a competition. Nobody has time to come clear back down to a cold bore, but try not to string shots together - not more than one shot every 2 min. Relax on the line, open your bolt, let the heat escape both ends of the bore, re-read your range card, write another line of a letter to a friend - whatever you want to do to keep yourself from getting impatient and shooting again too soon.

G) Sit more upright than you'd naturally expect. Guys complain about recoil over the bench because they set themselves up to take the full hit of the recoil - which isn't necessary. The lower your bench or higher your seat, the more you'll be "laying" at the bench instead of sitting. The more upright your torso, the more you'll be able to move with recoil instead of taking the full hit as if you were laying prone.

H) Put the rifle more in front of you than you'd naturally expect. Guys often tend to have a bad habit of turning nearly sideways to the target when they shoot over a bench, which twists your body, takes the trigger away from your hand, brings the scope closer to your face, and puts you in an overall un-natural position. Your shoulders should be closer to parallel to the firing line than perpendicular. Remembering to position the rifle in front of you on the bench instead of beside you will help mitigate that habit in your initial set up. (If your target were alive, it should be able to read your t-shirt when you get over the rifle).

There's a lot more to it than that, but those will get you started.
 
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