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Discussion Starter #22
Does this mean that in rural areas attackers come smaller and less robust so a less powerful cartridge is enough? Seen this line of reasoning before, often in discussions of the 22LR as a defensive round. Small calibers for small towns.
No, it doesn't mean that. If anything, people here are larger in general; these are farmers, loggers and fishermen around here; they tend to be larger and tougher than your average city goer. But when I pay attention to this rural/small town area -- compared to larger cities I've lived in (Bangor, Portland OR, Albuquerque) -- I see that violent crime rates -- especially assaults, attacks, homicides, murders -- are far lower here than in the bigger cities, metropolis's, megopolis. Even the local police will tell you that; yes, I called the police station before I moved here to inquire, and spoke to an officer. So I feel less need to carry a large-capacity, higher caliber handgun. It's based more on intuition than logic, observation than statistics. Doesn't mean that I won't regret not carrying something larger. But I feel just a bit less need here. And for me, survival in part is a game of odds. (Maybe because I'm formally trained in probability theory and statistics, so I tend to see the world in probability terms.)

But that's kind of an "also ran" factor, not a major one driving this decision. I'm aware of the differences between 380 and 9. A 9x19 would still be unequivocally better than a 9x17. Check. But since I'm having trouble with the former -- adequately handling it, less able to deal with pistol trouble (read "jam") and slower followup shots -- I feel that a 9x17 is still better than a .22 for me, especially since it seems my probability of trouble is lower here.

If I'm wrong and die because of it, feel free to say, "I told him so." ;)
 

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Yes, the odds of being attacked are lower but the nature of the attack if it comes would not be affected by the odds of it happening. They can be just as big and come at you just as hard.
Like your write up, interesting stuff, keep at it.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I have a SW 380 EZ. I like it very much. Accurate little gun too.
Glad to read that. It's consistent with reviews I'm reading.

My hope is that someone owning -- or having owned -- both will choose one of these: Either the EZ380 is {substantially; noticeably; significantly} easier to rack than the LC380, or there's not really much difference between them in terms of racking ease. Yes, yes, I know that what's hard for one person may be a piece of cake for another. But my reasoning is, if an Olympic weight lifter can detect a difference between the two, then I'd call that substantial.

Of course, even better if it's addressed by someone with hand strength issues (or arthritis, or whatever). Then the difference will likely be even more noticeable.
 

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I have arthritis in my index and middle finger on my dominant hand. I can rack my 1911's with them. But with a modified grip. The ez i can rack it with a pinch grip. I also have a Walther pk380. It's easy too. But not as easy as the SW. Unless i cock the hammer first.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
PriseDeFer, thanks.

And about your point, I agree with you, and am trying to be clear that I'm not implying otherwise. Attacks are attacks independent of probability or frequency. For sure.

Like always, it's a matter of balancing factors to try to achieve some kind of optimal for the person and situation. That's where I'm at. If I was 47, 250 lb and agile, I might be carrying a .45 ACP.

But I'm not, so striving for that best alternative for me now. In my 50's and 60's, that was 9x19. Perfect for me once I found the right pistols (compact, single stack). Now that's changing, and it seems that a 9x17 is going to be both easier to rack, to clear a problem and to do double and triple taps with. My bullets won't be as big, fast and bad ass as a .45 or a 9x19, but I can get the 2nd and 3rd down range and on target more quickly, so ... I dunno, we'll see. It's all just a hypothesis for now.
 

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^Yeah, I'm feeling that too. Not necessarily too big, but on the big side.
If you go IWB, slide length is not so big a deal. If you go OWB it is definitely a consideration. If you are thinking pocket carry, that is probably too long. I pocket carry a Shield 9mm (not the EZ) and it is about as big as you can conceal in a pocket holster, and I only wear slacks or cargo pants with large pockets.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
NP, thanks. I hear you. I sometimes pocket carry my current pistol -- that EC9s -- but except for summer when it rides in Carhartt trousers -- usually in a cavernous front pocket on my insulated overalls (this time of year for sure) or in my coat pocket. I think at least the latter two would swallow the EZ380, but not the Carhartt's so easily.

But in warmer seasons, often in a shoulder holster, but soon in a chest holster. There, the extra length won't matter so much other than for velocity.
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
Late Friday night update. (Another rip roaring night here in rural eastern Maine.) After watching more video "reviews" about the EZ380 -- to a point of feeling boredom now with the same specs over and over and over -- it's beginning to grow on me. Even the larger size as I compare my EC9s, visualizing how the EZ380 would fit my hand differently, and potentially better.

There's one nagging question that I can't let go of, though, and I haven't seen it addressed yet. I get it why it's being marketed to certain groups: new shooters, people with hand strength issues for what ever reason. But I don't understand why most reviewers allege or imply that they are the only people who will be interested in or need this pistol, despite how they rave about how much they like the EZ380, including the sub-5 lb smooth trigger, the grip and its texture, how it takes down. Several have claimed that it's not going to be popular among shooters who shoot thousands of rounds at the range per year.

Why not? Is it a machissimo thing, that real guns are not so easy to operate and control? Is it a durability issue, that the lighter recoil spring (etc) won't stand up over time to large numbers of rounds? Or something else?
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Right. So since there are actually two factors in my post just above, I'll highlight the second -- and for me, more important one. Is there any reason to believe that the EZ380 is less robust, less durable long term because of the way it's engineered to be "easy" to operate, etc?

I strongly suspect the answer is no. Why would a reputable company build a less robust, less durable firearm? But I've always felt that the stupidest questions were those left unasked because the answer is assumed. So I'll ask it anyway. Leave no stone unturned.

For kicks, I'm planning to call Smith Wesson to inquire about this issue, and hear the way a rep addresses it. I have another couple of questions for them about it anyway.
 

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What is the 380 ez going for these days? When i got mine. It came with a range pack. Shooting glasses, ear muffs, bore rope and a range bag. I think i paid 300 OTD.
 

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What is the 380 ez going for these days? When i got mine. It came with a range pack. Shooting glasses, ear muffs, bore rope and a range bag. I think i paid 300 OTD.
Wow, that sounds like a bargain.
 
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Discussion Starter #35 (Edited)
I can't really find any prices on any gun right now, at least the ones I'm interested in. There's just nothing around, and when it gets there, it doesn't stay long. My local gun shop can't even guess a price; but she expects supply to not return until summer. Hope she's wrong. But even Bud's Gunshop -- usually a bellwether for prices -- lists the EZ380 as out of stock.
 

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No, it doesn't mean that. If anything, people here are larger in general; these are farmers, loggers and fishermen around here; they tend to be larger and tougher than your average city goer. But when I pay attention to this rural/small town area -- compared to larger cities I've lived in (Bangor, Portland OR, Albuquerque) -- I see that violent crime rates -- especially assaults, attacks, homicides, murders -- are far lower here than in the bigger cities, metropolis's, megopolis. Even the local police will tell you that; yes, I called the police station before I moved here to inquire, and spoke to an officer. So I feel less need to carry a large-capacity, higher caliber handgun. It's based more on intuition than logic, observation than statistics. Doesn't mean that I won't regret not carrying something larger. But I feel just a bit less need here. And for me, survival in part is a game of odds. (Maybe because I'm formally trained in probability theory and statistics, so I tend to see the world in probability terms.)

But that's kind of an "also ran" factor, not a major one driving this decision. I'm aware of the differences between 380 and 9. A 9x19 would still be unequivocally better than a 9x17. Check. But since I'm having trouble with the former -- adequately handling it, less able to deal with pistol trouble (read "jam") and slower followup shots -- I feel that a 9x17 is still better than a .22 for me, especially since it seems my probability of trouble is lower here.

If I'm wrong and die because of it, feel free to say, "I told him so." ;)
I own a Bersa Firestorm .380 that I can shoot very well. With regards to a defensive firearm.. shot placement plays a HUGE roll. I'd rather carry something that I can put shots on target with. Hits with a .22 or .380 are far better than misses with a bigger gun.
 

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I have an interest in a reliable .380 because I have a bunch of .380 ammo and no firearm in that caliber. I’ll be keeping an eye on your decision and results.
 

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Late Friday night update. (Another rip roaring night here in rural eastern Maine.) After watching more video "reviews" about the EZ380 -- to a point of feeling boredom now with the same specs over and over and over -- it's beginning to grow on me. Even the larger size as I compare my EC9s, visualizing how the EZ380 would fit my hand differently, and potentially better.

There's one nagging question that I can't let go of, though, and I haven't seen it addressed yet. I get it why it's being marketed to certain groups: new shooters, people with hand strength issues for what ever reason. But I don't understand why most reviewers allege or imply that they are the only people who will be interested in or need this pistol, despite how they rave about how much they like the EZ380, including the sub-5 lb smooth trigger, the grip and its texture, how it takes down. Several have claimed that it's not going to be popular among shooters who shoot thousands of rounds at the range per year.

Why not? Is it a machissimo thing, that real guns are not so easy to operate and control? Is it a durability issue, that the lighter recoil spring (etc) won't stand up over time to large numbers of rounds? Or something else?
I have a hypothesis, there is no proof or facts provided just an idea.....to be EZ it would make sense that parts are not tight fitting and springs are lighter or broken in (like a well worn handgun). It's still durable-coating is new, and more accurate than most shooters but probably not a target/competition quality pistol.....thus people don't think it's for that crowd, you know the ones that go to the range and shoot thousands of rounds.;)

As long as S&W backs these with a warranty just like their other firearms then it would seem they are comfortable with the durability/longevity.

I am interested to hear what S&W has to say if you get a chance to ask them.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
DLbind, that's a very reasonable hypothesis. I hadn't thought of it, but reading it made instant sense to me. I mean, SW does have their performance center, and a line of usually more expensive models that come out of it with smoothed actions, more attention to details, etc. It makes sense, to me at least, that they'd do something like that with a standard production model with special needs -- just build the performance treatments right into production. Makes it like it's well broken in with already thousands of rounds through it to get it to that point.

There may be other factors involved -- in fact, probably are; one hypothesis is rarely enough to fully explain a complex phenomenon. But that could well be one of them.

I plan to call SW sometime early next week -- they have a M-F call schedule. I'll not lead with this hypothesis, but see what the rep says on his/her own. I'll certainly raise this possibility if they don't. I may actually make two different calls on different days to speak with more than one rep. I find that some reps are more knowledgeable than others, have insights that others don't. Better to get multiple opinions.

I'm going to do that with Ruger, also -- a second call soon. Last week, I spoke to a rep there trying to get an estimate (or even an actual measurement) of the recoil spring weight on an LC380. He sounded like a younger fellow with a bit of an eager "I know the answer to this, and I know what I'm talking about -- don't question me" tone, and for perhaps my first time (calling Ruger) I didn't trust his response. He seemed to believe that it would be the same or nearly so as an LC9s. When I pressed him a bit, he got a bit annoyed, so I just thanked him and let it go.
 
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