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I know a longer barrel is probably a better choice. Seems to follow then, that a rifle would be the best choice but not the only choice. Some people use bows and arrows. My question is, knowing that my 454 Alaskan is not the ideal hunting weapon, is it a viable option for hog or deer hunting? I imagine someone here has hunted successfully with theirs.....right?
 

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If you get close enough to hit reliably, the Alaskan should be a dandy deer or wild hog gun. Of course, "close enough" is the key; it will take some pretty good stalking skills (or luck) to get close enough that your probability of hitting the target in a vital zone is better than random chance.

You could also use the Alaskan as a squirrel gun, since it will kill, dress and cook them all at the same time.



Jim
 

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No stalking skills involved if you sit in a box, pop-up blind or a tree stand. I don't do any of those, but you should be paper plate accurate at 50-75 yards with plenty of practice.
 

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I think the biggest drawback would be the sight radius. I notice that Ruger does not put the scope mount cuts on the top so they don't intend them to be primarily hunting revolvers.

Here is how you find out.

Do this in any position you anticipate shooting from. Kneeling, standing, etc.

Starting at 15 yards, shoot at a paper plate target. If you can hit it every and I mean every shot, you can take a deer from that range. Move the target out another 10 yards. Repeat. Pretty soon, you should be able to get a clear picture of what range you can hunt with that revolver from different positions. If you take a shot from a greater range, then you are unethical and should not be allowed in a woods with a gun. Not that you would, but that's the concept.

I like that 454 Casull 5" barrel distributor exclusive on Ruger's site and would love to have one except I don't want to add another caliber to the stable.
 

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You can hunt and kill with a rock. Its not very effective. Early hunters learned a bow and arrow was better. Still not very effective, but better than a rock. Then they learned a flintlock was better. Still not very effective, but better than a bow and arrow. Then they learned to rifle the barrels. NOW they were getting somewhere.

Your Alaskan has a rifled barrel. Its better than a rock, bow and arrow or flintlock. Is it better than a rifle? No, but its effective at killing. Are there better choices? YES. I would limit the range to 50 yards.
 

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Righteous Dude
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Interesting question. If the Alaskan had the scope scallops like the SRH, I wonder if a scope (though ridiculous looking) would inch out some good accuracy... or even a red dot.

I say if you humanely take game, go for it. Better practice! :)
 

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Interesting question. If the Alaskan had the scope scallops like the SRH, I wonder if a scope (though ridiculous looking) would inch out some good accuracy... or even a red dot.

I say if you humanely take game, go for it. Better practice! :)
I've seen tests showing that most snubbies are inherently pretty accurate, if you can point them repeatably, either with a Ransom rest or some sort of optical sight. The accuracy limitation is the short sight radius and the rudimentary sight. I imagine that if you could put a red dot sight on it, the Alaskan would be good to 50 or even 75 yards.


Jim
 

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And that's what I would surmise. If the shooter was able gain better sighting, I'd think it'd be fairly formidable. The thing is, who puts optics on snubbies?

Similarly, I was thinking about my j-frame. Or even a SP. Would someone hunt with a 357 snub? It's an interesting topic.
 

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Check your state regs. Some states have a minimum barrel length for deer hunting with a handgun. In our state of Wisconsin, you need 5 1/2" measured from firing pin to the muzzle. The Alaskan would not be a legal deer gun, here.
 

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If you can get within sufficient range to allow you to consistently hit the vitals of any animal in North America with the 454Casull Alaskan, you WILL kill it.

The 454C Alaskan delivers more power than a 9.5" or 10.5" 44mag revolver. The issue isn't power. It's placement.

If you want to improve your sighting device on the Alaskan a bit, consider a JP sight mount (JPA-RR, modified) with a Burris FastFire III. The front sight of an Alaskan revolver is wider than 16MOA for a 6ft tall man, swapping for a 3moa dot sight will let you overcome the short sight radius.

Practice a lot, get close enough to place the shot, and kill whatever you want to kill in North America with ease.
 

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I have carrying my large frame, 5" Vaquero in 45 Colt when hunting out of a tree stand. I've killed five deer with it using my 325gn handloads. I never shoot over 30 yds and have never had a deer get up. I just bought an Alaskan 454 for a fishing trip to Alaska at the end of the month. I would think with practice to get to know your gun and your abilities you shouldn't have any problems with taking deer with it. I just make it a practice to use my long gun for even a questionable shoot. Like Clint Eastwood said "A man has to know his limitations".
 
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