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I store all my ammo in ammo cans. When I first started doing this, I would apply some Breakfree CLP to the rubber (neoprene?) seal gaskets with a q-tip, because I once read somewhere that this could help increase their longevity. Now I'm reading that I may have done more harm than good as petroleum based oils can breakdown rubber. Great...I have probably done this to 15-20 cans, and although I haven't noticed any deterioration, I really haven't been looking that closely. Although, applying the Breakfree to the seals turns the q-tip black. Am I over stressing? I really don't want to have to replace $200 worth of cans, but I will if that's what I need to do to ensure they have good seals.
 

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I don't know about the CLP, but Maglite recommends wiping down the o-rings on their flashlights with petroleum jelly. I assume (yes, I know the definition) that it would carry over to the ammo cans well.
 

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I keep a tube of KY in the garage for working on the race car, for that exact reason. Over time petroleum will eat rubber and neoprene. Mainly because they're made from petroleum, and petroleum based lubes act like a solvent and deteriorate the gasket or o-ring. Water based lubes do not. But fear not, clean your gaskets good to get the petroleum off of them, and I seriously doubt they're hurt. It takes time and/or pressure.

OK that being said, let the comments and jokes fly! LMAO
 

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I keep a tube of KY in the garage for working on the race car, for that exact reason. Over time petroleum will eat rubber and neoprene. Mainly because they're made from petroleum, and petroleum based lubes act like a solvent and deteriorate the gasket or o-ring. Water based lubes do not. But fear not, clean your gaskets good to get the petroleum off of them, and I seriously doubt they're hurt. It takes time and/or pressure.

OK that being said, let the comments and jokes fly! LMAO
You keep KY in the garage.... :D

Sounds like my assumption lived up to it's definition.
 

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I keep a tube of KY in the garage for working on the race car, for that exact reason. Over time petroleum will eat rubber and neoprene. Mainly because they're made from petroleum, and petroleum based lubes act like a solvent and deteriorate the gasket or o-ring. Water based lubes do not. But fear not, clean your gaskets good to get the petroleum off of them, and I seriously doubt they're hurt. It takes time and/or pressure.

OK that being said, let the comments and jokes fly! LMAO
I bet you spend alot of time in the garage, tinkering and such. But I also agree with water based lube. Pretty harmless to rubber components. I use an o ring lube.
 

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I knew when I posted that, the comments would soon follow. I expected and deserve it! :D

Seriously though, garage KY works great on assembling braided hose ends, transmission O-rings etc. Makes assembly and the all too often disassembly much easier.
 

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lube

lubes for my swimming pool filter and pump do not harm the rubber gaskets
or the plastic hardware, some of this looks a lot like KY jelly.
I believe it is more economical.
 

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I knew when I posted that, the comments would soon follow. I expected and deserve it! :D

Seriously though, garage KY works great on assembling braided hose ends, transmission O-rings etc. Makes assembly and the all too often disassembly much easier.
Not bad for the occaisional brunette fender cover, either?...........:D

I cleaned and repainted used GI cans, so all my o-rings are covered with Krylon satin Italian Olive. Doesn't seem to have hurt them in five years.
 

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I would use dielectric grease. The shiznit for seals IMO is dupont Krytox GPL 205 but is not cheap
 

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Yes, you are over stressing.

If you feel the need, clean them up then give them a squirt of silicon spray.
 

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I store all my ammo in ammo cans. When I first started doing this, I would apply some Breakfree CLP to the rubber (neoprene?) seal gaskets with a q-tip, because I once read somewhere that this could help increase their longevity. Now I'm reading that I may have done more harm than good as petroleum based oils can breakdown rubber. Great...I have probably done this to 15-20 cans, and although I haven't noticed any deterioration, I really haven't been looking that closely. Although, applying the Breakfree to the seals turns the q-tip black. Am I over stressing? I really don't want to have to replace $200 worth of cans, but I will if that's what I need to do to ensure they have good seals.
DO NOT LUBE THOSE RUBBER GASKETS WITH SOLVENT OR OIL!

If you must, then only the following chemicals are appropriate:
1. Dow Corning Vacuum grease
2. Vaseline
3. Vegetable grease, (e.g. Crisco)

Only use a very thin coat. That is, rub some of the stuff on your fingers and wipe a very thin film on the rubber.

Anything else, and you will cause the rubber to swell, deform, and eventually crack.

The only chemically resistant rubber I know of are either Viton, or Buna-N. Even in these cases, you need to be careful, and keep these away from solvents or low molecular weight petroleum based products.

I am not so sure about KY jelly. KY, is a water soluble lubricant that will not irritate human tissue. At least, this is what I have been told.
 

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A silicon based lubricant is best. In SCUBA diving this is what is used on the O-rings on the air tanks. It's a silicon type grease. When your life is involved, you want what is made for it, not something that will work.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I ended up putting some of this on the seals, now I'm done worrying about it. Thanks for the replies.

 

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DO NOT LUBE THOSE RUBBER GASKETS WITH SOLVENT OR OIL!

If you must, then only the following chemicals are appropriate:
1. Dow Corning Vacuum grease
2. Vaseline
3. Vegetable grease, (e.g. Crisco)

Only use a very thin coat. That is, rub some of the stuff on your fingers and wipe a very thin film on the rubber.

Anything else, and you will cause the rubber to swell, deform, and eventually crack.

The only chemically resistant rubber I know of are either Viton, or Buna-N. Even in these cases, you need to be careful, and keep these away from solvents or low molecular weight petroleum based products.

I am not so sure about KY jelly. KY, is a water soluble lubricant that will not irritate human tissue. At least, this is what I have been told.
1-vacuum grease is a silicon based product, as is dielectric grease, as is silicon spray and a plethora of other products. Their carriers are of more concern, especially sprays, which is why it's best to spray first onto a rag and then apply

2-vaseline can swell rubber

3-vegetable oil is a no no due to their drying/oxidizing characteristics. Some vegetable oils are used as furniture finishes and they certainly dry out, as in they form a solid state when exposed to oxygen.
 

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Sounds like it may be best to just keep them clean and dry. :)
 

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Sounds like it may be best to just keep them clean and dry. :)
If you're worried about them drying out, FrogLube can come to the rescue once again. Not only is is great for metal, but plastics, wood and rubber, too.

I also wouldn't recommend silicone based lubes, but water based should be fine.
 

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I've never thought about it to be honest. I've had the same ammo cans for over 3 decades and they were used when I got them. I have done nothing to the seals in them. I guess it was never anything to concern me. No point in worrying about it now.
 
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