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Hello: I'm new to the forum, but I'm not new to Ruger firearms (My father passed down to me a .22 single-action revolver and a .22 rifle that together we used to shoot). My fingers are crossed that tomorrow I will be in possession of my third Ruger (if the tracking number data are accurate). It is a model 5041 44 Mag double-action Redhawk. When I pick it up at my local gun shop I plan to purchase ammo before I head to the range. As most, or all, of you know, the impressive advancements made by Ruger in designing the Redhawk allow for the relatively safe use of ammo that is more powerful than your everyday 44 Mag. Whereas I likely will eventually graduate to using more powerful loads, I am looking for advice for which ammo I should use in a new, non-fired, Ruger revolver. I use various brands for my other firearms, one of which is Magtech. Does anyone care to comment or share insight regarding this matter? I'm considering Magtech, 44 Magnum, FMJ-FP, brass case, 240 grain with a muzzle velocity of 1,178 fps and muzzle energy of 741 ft.-lbs. Or I might bump it up a little to a Federal (American Eagle) 44 with 1,230 fps and 805 ft.-lbs. I would appreciate any thoughts. Thanks.
 

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...As most, or all, of you know, the impressive advancements made by Ruger in designing the Redhawk allow for the relatively safe use of ammo that is more powerful than your everyday 44 Mag...
What do you mean by "everyday 44 Mag"? The SAAMI max pressure standard for the .44 Remington Magnum is 36,000 psi. Any factory loading of the cartridge should be under this figure and safe in any .44 Magnum firearm in good condition. Just because the .44 Magnum Redhawk revolver is an inherently strong design, doesn't mean one should shoot loads exceeding 36,000 psi in it.

To me, an "everyday 44 Mag" is a loading of a 240 gr jacketed bullet at around 1200-1300 fps MV in a handgun.

That said, you don't need to have a loading of that power when starting out with a Redhawk. .44 Magnum factory ammo is very expensive. The more powerful loads are often the more expensive ones. For basic paper punching, I would try a few of the lower velocity loadings with 200-240 gr bullets to see which one is the most accurate in your gun at 25-50 yds. Once you find a good target load, purchase it in bulk at the lowest per-round cost possible. The Magtech load you are considering seems like it could be a good target load, if it shoots well for you and your gun.
 

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I would stick with standard (what I call standard) .44 mag loads in the 741 muzzle energy range with 240gr. That's if you want to start out low until you get a feel for the recoil. Up to you.

How to know which one's? Sportsman's Guide online is a good place to review it all and gives the specifications. See link below. I order from them because my LGS/Range doesn't cary much of a variety in .44 Mag at all. It's really dismal and that's also true for 44 Special. Ordering online, you can get what you want.

My first choice for range shooting is Magtech, FMJ (full metal jacket), 240gr. And it seems to be clean burning as well.

https://www.sportsmansguide.com/pro...mmo/44-remington-magnum-ammo?d=121&c=95&s=930
 

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If your previous experience is only with .22 rimfires, your in for a real surprise when you first shoot your new Blackhawk.

As noted, factory .44 Mag ammo is very hot and loaded to quite high pressure as it has always been chambered in modern firearms. It's not like .45 Colt which is usually loaded to black powder pressures to protect old guns so there are modern high pressure loads restricted to modern guns.

As a start consider buying a box of .44 Special ammo to get used to the new revolver with lower blast and recoil and then buy a box of any commercial .44 Mag.
 

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+1 on .44 special ammo to start with. Once you are comfortable with that then start working some .44 mag in. The only previous experience you mentioned was shooting .22’s and as has been mentioned you stepped up quite a bit in recoil and noise on the shooter side. If you haven’t shot a .44 mag before I don’t think you realize what a step up it is.
 

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So, here I go to the range for the first time with my brand new Redhawk and all they have to sell is some very expensive hot, obviously, Hornady and of course, being unfamiliar with 44 magnum, I commence to shoot it anyway. I just didn't know....do now!!!! It was all the LGS had and I wasn't about to go home without trying my new gun.

I was introduced to 44 magnum the hard way but it wasn't too bad. Later, when I did some spec research on all the brands and bullet weights, I learned what to stay with unless I'm out on a big game hunt.

Second trip to the range with my Redhawk: I had standard load 240gr, 741 energy and it was noticeably lighter to shoot than the Hornady. There's quite a variety. Also shot a box of 44 special and it had less of a kick than my 1911 with 230gr 45 Auto. Not surprising given the weight of my Redhawk with the 7.5" barrel.

Learn what's out there in .44 Magnum.
 

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the old standard for .44 magnum pressure used to be higher than 36k psi. The CIP standard follows the old pressure at 41k psi.

The Norma and Samson .44 mag I have from the 1980s is noticeably hotter than current US production.
 

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Blazer .44 Magnum is relatively inexpensive and milder than a lot of the other factory loads. You can often find it for less than $25 for a box of 50- often times cheaper than .44 special.
 

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The Magtech is a good practice load. I've shot quite a bit of their 240gr JSP load through my 7.5" Redhawk. Their brass has been good for the five or six times I've reloaded them with my hunting load. That load uses either the Hornady 240gr XTP HP or the Magtech 240gr JSP bullet and exits the muzzle at over 1400fps. Fiochi also makes good, inexpensive (relatively speaking) .44mag ammo. Avoid any of the premium hunting loads sold in 20rd boxes as it's ridiculously expensive and overpowered for practice. Have fun, but only shoot a few cylinder's full at a time concentrating on the fundamentals to avoid developing a flinch. Shoot more with a similar rimfire or medium bore centerfire handgun to build skills. Happy shooting.
 

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Magtech is reliable, but I find it to be dirty in .44 mag and spcl. American Eagle is clean and reliable. Underwood is hot, but also reliable and clean. I also shoot Hornady in my Redhawk, but I think the box says not for revolvers. Never had a problem with the leverlution stuff in my RH.
 
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