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Hi everyone, thanks for welcoming me to your forum. I'm 65 and live in NC. Retired from government after 34 years, as C, Project Br. Mgr. I purchased a 9mm P95DC new around six years ago and have never fired a round through it. But since the world is rapidly changing around us and getting worse, decided to get familiar with it, and especially to train my wife. I'm somewhat familiar with guns since I've had a Blackhawk Super Single Six for about 35 years, but not familiar with grain. I decided to pick up practice rounds and take my wife to pistol range to finally shoot it. While I was at gun shop also purchased Remington 9mm Luger (Subsonic RTP9MM8) 147 gr JHP. After reading thread posted about a 147 gr not discharging from firing chamber and having to update the gun, am I going to have any of the same problems? I also noticed that on side of barrel where the shells discharge, it has scribed on it, 9mm x 19.
 

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Righteous Dude
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Welcome!

Your pistol will fire the 9mm which may also be noted as 9x19, 9 parabellum, or 9mm Luger. It's all the same.

The typical bullet weights for plinking practice and defense are 115gr or 124gr. Pick up some defense ammo in these grains and also get practice ammo in the same weight. Other weights exist. I generally stick with 115 or 124 depending on the pistol.
 

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If I understand your post correctly you are asking what grain means? It is simply a measure of weight like ounces or grams and such. As neon said 115 and 124 are most common in the plinking weights. The sub-sonic rounds may not function in you pistol as they are a reduced power load to make them quieter by reducing the velocity. I would just return them if you can. Good luck and enjoy shooting you 9mm
 

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Welcome Bob!

The P95 was my first firearm, ever. And it is a great gun, and it still pulls home defense duty along with others that I have added to my collection since then.

As was said, the grain is the bullet weight.

The great thing about the P95, it will shoot pretty much any brand and weight ammo you can put in it. I tend to shoot 124gr rounds out of my 9mm's, but if I can't find any, I use the 115gr stuff too (which seems to be the most available). My SD rounds are always 124gr though.

Be safe and happy shooting!
 

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Welcome to the forum. The previous posts were written by knowledgeable folks. My only recommendation would be to buy a 50-round box of personal protection ammo of the same weight (grains) and shoot one magazine each time that you go to the range to shoot your target (range) ammo. I personally prefer 115 grain ball ammo in my P95DC. Enjoy and stay safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks to all, that answers my questions and I'll be sticking to the 124 if I can find them. Like you, I couldn't find any on the shelf and not knowing what grain, was thinking that 115 didn't have the stopping power if needed for defense and is the reason for the purchase of the 147. Bob
 

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GONRA sez its handy to know there are 7000 grains to the pound.
Not sure where this "unit of weight" is still used in addition for US gun stuff....
Prety sure grams are used overseas....
 

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Welcome!

Your pistol will fire the 9mm which may also be noted as 9x19, 9 parabellum, or 9mm Luger. It's all the same.

The typical bullet weights for plinking practice and defense are 115gr or 124gr. Pick up some defense ammo in these grains and also get practice ammo in the same weight. Other weights exist. I generally stick with 115 or 124 depending on the pistol.
9X19, 9mm Parabellum, 9mm Luger are the cartridge designator, and are all the same.

9mm alone means nothing- it is a unit of measurement, and 9mm Luger bullets are .355 inch diameter, same as .380, .38 Special, (3.57"), .357 Magnum (.357") and about at least a half dozen other very different cartridges.

Essentially any of the .38's, .380's, .356's, .357's, 9mm Luger, 9mm Short all could be called 9mm. Here's a partial list:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9_mm_caliber

Gunning is all about precision. Let's try to be precise.

Radio George
 
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