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Have 1980's.... 505 & 10 yr old RCBS check weight set(which keep uncontaminated for sure). Great scale!!, yet in recent years I get a little concerned with charges under 8 or 9 graines.

Have eScale to cross check but even its not as accurate as a good beam scale, IMO. But ekectronic good for weighing bullets, h2o & cases too.
 

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Back in the early ‘90s friends of mine knew I reloaded shotshells. They bought a box full of miscellaneous stuff at an auction for $2. Gave me an Ohaus 10-10 that was in the bottom of the box that was missing the pan. Bought one mail order (pre-internet) and got a great scale for about $15 total.

I also use a cheap digital for double checking shot charges and for other hobby related stuff.

Try to find a used one online.
 

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I didnt read through all the replies so this may be a repeat. I use an Ohaus. It is probably 45 yrs. old and I like it. I have recently picked up an RCBS electronic scale and powder meter but use it for powder measure. I use Ohaus to statistically verify weights. Also use the Ohaus for bullets and brass.
 

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I also recommend the RCBS 10-10. I have a set of check weights as well just to check accuracy from time to time. Using mine for 20 years now.
 

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I have an RCBS 10-10 scale that I got in a trade 30 years or more ago and it was fairly old then. But it still works just fine. Just in front of the RCBS is my Dillon DeTerminator electronic scale. The Dillon and RCBS scales get zeroed every time I use them plus I have check weights from 3 to 710 grains. On smaller pistol charges I tend to use the beam scale because the electronic seems to get a bit hokey when first starting out with charges in the single digit range. I have found that a lot of people don't even know their scales (both types) need to be zeroed often, nor how to do it. Your beam scale should be re-zeroed every time it is moved even a bit. It's quite easy to have it be off by .1 to .5 grains just by moving it an inch or so. Probably not a big deal if you're loading mid range .38's but if you are anywhere near a max load on anything it can be the difference between an ok & and an over pressure load. In fact, I usually rezero/calibrate my electronic scale every time I start out on higher pressure rounds and then cross check it with the beam scale as well. As much as I love my electronic scale, if I could only have one it would be the beam scale. The electronic scales can drift even when recalibrated so if it's all you have, check weights are mandatory! You just can't be too careful when using scales of any type.
Cheers,
crkckr
 

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I use a Dillon that I bought second hand with the rest of my kit back in the early '90s, and it still works great.

When I load for precision rifle, I use the RCBS Chargemaster to throw light charges. I toss them into the Dillon and then I trickle the rest.
 

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5-0-5

I have used an old Bonanza beam scale for 40 years or more, and it has served me well. I would lke to get a scale that has magnetic dampening, though, and thought I would see what everyone else uses. Any recommendations?
I too have a RCBS 5-0-5. After many decades of use I wanted a faster weigh-up for custom loads and went to a Digital RCBS trickle powder scale. I am very happy with it. I do still use the RCBS 5-0-5 to verify calibration of the Digital scale. Gravity never lies.
 

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The RCBS 505 and 1010 have both been replaced by the M500 and M1000, both to their detriment. If you want a new scale, the 1010 from OHAUS/RCBS is the way to go imo. They can be had used or old stock for 100-150 bucks, just make sure you get the green one if you want imperial. The tan one is metric. If you're in the market, I can reach out to some folks who sell reloading equipment for ya.
 

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Unless you can find a Ohaus/RCBS Dial-O-Grain in good shape at a reasonable price, the RCBS 10-10 is the way to go.
 

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I've got a Redding balance beam scale that is about 40+ years old but according to my weights it's still 100% reliable. I also have an digital Lyman ran on a single AAA battery that has proven fairly accurate once warmed up, but the trick is to have it warmed up and away from other electric appliances when in use. However when I start to approach maximum loadings I rely on my Redding balance beam exclusively.
 

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I used an Ohaus beam scale(the RCBS 505, but a different color) for ~40 years, then bought a Dillon Eliminator. I use a set of Lyman check weights to zero for lower charges, and a 53 gr. Verified weight varmint bullet to zero for larger charges.
 

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What do you guys feel about the hornady balance beam scale? IS it at least better then the lee safety scale?

I started with just a lee safety beam scale, and when I realized it I tossed it and stopped reloading until I can find a better option..... but its been 4 months now without figuring out a replacement.
 

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What do you guys feel about the hornady balance beam scale? IS it at least better then the lee safety scale?

I started with just a lee safety beam scale, and when I realized it I tossed it and stopped reloading until I can find a better option..... but its been 4 months now without figuring out a replacement.
I have a lot of Hornady products that I use everyday and like a lot. Their LNL balance beam is one that I don’t. I went through several of them when they first came out a few years ago and Hornady ended up giving me a electronic bench scale instead.
None of them would match any of the test weights I have and to be frank are poorly made. But there seems to be many out there who have it and have had no issues with it. I appear to be one of the few who like the Hornady electronic bench scale as it has been working for several years now with no issues.
If you can find a used RCBS 505, 1010, Ohaus, Redding, in mint shape that would be the way to go or look at the new ones that the OEM’s have.
If not then maybe give the Hornady beam scale a chance.
 

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I have a lot of Hornady products that I use everyday and like a lot. Their LNL balance beam is one that I don’t. I went through several of them when they first came out a few years ago and Hornady ended up giving me a electronic bench scale instead.
None of them would match any of the test weights I have and to be frank are poorly made. But there seems to be many out there who have it and have had no issues with it. I appear to be one of the few who like the Hornady electronic bench scale as it has been working for several years now with no issues.
If you can find a used RCBS 505, 1010, Ohaus, Redding, in mint shape that would be the way to go or look at the new ones that the OEM’s have.
If not then maybe give the Hornady beam scale a chance.
Im hesitant on a scale that claims to use "knife edge pivot points" like lee and hornady claim too.

I had my lee have a unique machining issue that gave it an option for 3 yes 3 places for the little razor blade to balance on. AND you actually couldn't get it get on the same spot twice. And none of the spots gave identical measurements.
Last time I tried to use it, I was loading 10 grains of red dot into .308 Winchester, I measured out in 5 grain measurements, and well when I was done I ended up with 20 grains in my case... although the pan balanced out at 10 using the big ball bearing.... So ive been avoiding reloading.

I was also using the newest yellow lee dippers, but have an issue is that SOME give you less then they are supposed to, and others give you MORE..
 

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In past have cleaned my 505 with rubbing alcohol, not sure if this is best?.

Keep mine in a little cubby but my little workshop minimizes dust, almost none it seems. Yet was also curious if other contaminates in air could settle on any precision instrument?

May consider keeping it in a cabinet.
 

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Im hesitant on a scale that claims to use "knife edge pivot points" like lee and hornady claim too.

I had my lee have a unique machining issue that gave it an option for 3 yes 3 places for the little razor blade to balance on. AND you actually couldn't get it get on the same spot twice. And none of the spots gave identical measurements.
Last time I tried to use it, I was loading 10 grains of red dot into .308 Winchester, I measured out in 5 grain measurements, and well when I was done I ended up with 20 grains in my case... although the pan balanced out at 10 using the big ball bearing.... So ive been avoiding reloading.

I was also using the newest yellow lee dippers, but have an issue is that SOME give you less then they are supposed to, and others give you MORE..
All the balance beams use knife edges. Why not look at electronic scales?
 

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Been using my RCBS 505 beam scale decades, never a problem i check zero then use my RCBS check weights to confirm zero, and i am off and loading.
 

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magnetic damping caution

I've been using a Lyman Pro 1000 for a number of years. No complaints, but one caution and one recommendation.

Magnetic damping, at least on my scale, works well but can lead to small errors. The forces that provide the damping do introduce slight resistance when the scale is near equilibrium and at rest or moving slowly. The result is a tendency to stop prematurely, yielding a false reading or to be slightly restrained from moving from the stopped position. It's a noticeable event if you're watching what you're doing, so no real problem ... a slight bump on the pan to force a larger motion and things invariably settle correctly.

Check weights are always a good idea but need not be pricey calibration weights. Really, any odd piece of metal or whatever of known weight (or, more properly, "knowable") stable weight can be used ... I have several pricey commercial calibration weights but my most used and useful check weights are just odd bits of metal and a magnum primer that were cleaned once and are kept in a closed container.

In using check weights, you want to validate the scale reading beyond and below your target weight but at a reasonable interval. If my target is 5.2 grains, I'm much more comfortable knowing that my scale is reading correctly at 4.1 grains and 6.7 grains than I would be at 0 and 100.
 
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