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I did, it was amazing. I watched the entire thing while doing some homework. When he hit 100k feet my books went down and I was on the edge of my seat right up until he pulled the chute, once that happened I knew he was all good... 2500+ jumps under his belt. I figured he would be fine once he got under 50,000 feet with all his experience haha
 

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Yes I did. That was something. The old guy in mission control, who was relaying instructions was the old record setter. Neat he was there to help him.
 

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We watched right up until we had to leave for church, then DVR'd it.
Came home and watched with my son -- kind of neat to share a historical moment like that with him.

I guess someone doing it with a flight suit is next?
Or a 100,000 ft bungee?
 

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Yes I did. That was something. The old guy in mission control, who was relaying instructions was the old record setter. Neat he was there to help him.
Teamwork...the jump was pretty awesome!
 

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That guy has some very large solid brass cojones. Good for him!
 

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I loved it. However, I was also reminded that NASA or the Air Force used to do this kind of stuff, back in the 60's. That's how the 82 year old Joe Kittinger set his record. Granted I am glad they did it. But also said that our politicians see no value in doing such memorable stuff like this. Watched it with my wife and son. Great memories.
 

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Was great, watched the entire event. I think NASA and the Air force will try to get as much information and data they can from this jump
 

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It must have been quite a sight up there. I thought I heard if his suit lost pressure his blood would boil. Haven't figured that one out yet.
 

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What a view he had. The wife and I watched all of it. Having grown up in the space race years this sort of thing amazes me. Jumping out of the capsule with near no atmosphere takes some courage.
 

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It must have been quite a sight up there. I thought I heard if his suit lost pressure his blood would boil. Haven't figured that one out yet.

Not so much "boil" as "vaporize". Due to the essentially zero atmospheric pressure at that altitude any liquid will transition to the vapor state, or "boil away". That applies, of course, to all the fluids in our bodies.

I cannot imagine how that would feel . . . other then extremely, if briefly, painful.

:( :eek: :(
 

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Incredible! What makes this guy tick? Can you imagine thinking ... "Hey, wouldn't it be cool to jump from a helium balloon up in the stratosphere and break the sound barrier while free falling." ?

This guy deserves a Charles Lindberg style ticker tape parade.
 

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I'm glad the TV news covered that Joe Kittinger was Baumgartner's Mission Controller. Joe set the previous height record in the Sixties. Having to wait on this attempt created a nice coincidence, in that Baumgartner did it on the anniversary of Chuck Yeager being the first to break the sound barrier. Only Chuck had to use the Bell X-1 rocket plane.
 

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Not so much "boil" as "vaporize". Due to the essentially zero atmospheric pressure at that altitude any liquid will transition to the vapor state, or "boil away". That applies, of course, to all the fluids in our bodies.

I cannot imagine how that would feel . . . other then extremely, if briefly, painful.

:( :eek: :(
Actually boil or vaporize are the correct terms. Boiling point of liquid decreases as pressure decreases. Thats why a car coolant system boils less/later with a higher capcity radiator cap and why fluid immediatly boils in absence of atmosphere.
 
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