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I read an article recently by someone who used the David Tubbs Final Finish product on his barrel, and he reported groups were 38% smaller afterwards. The rifle was not a Ruger, it was a Remington 700.

Has anyone here tried Tubbs' product on a Ruger barrel? If yes, please share your experience. It's less than $50, and I am considering it for my 77/357.
 

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If you have a rough cut barrel with lots of tooling marks that fouls with copper bad or one that has a lot of variation in the diameter from the chamber to the crown then it "could" help.

The Marlin barrels seem to get better after fire lapping them but they start fairly bad from the get go.

The Ruger barrels are hammer forged on a mandrel are quite smooth and don't foul much if at all with copper or lead so what do you think you will get out of running in effect a grinder down the barrel.

38% improvement how bad was it before they started? Do you have a target rifle how accurate is it already?

If you think it will take a 1/2" rifle and turn it into a 1/4" rifle I don't think you will be happy.

I have fire lapped with the Beartooth Bullets kit more or less the same thing and it improved the Marlin but like I said the barrel was rough the groups got better but the fouling all but stopped with cooper and lead. The barrels diameter varied and the fire lapping corrected that. But like I said the Ruger hammer forged barrel takes care of that in the way it is manufactured they tapper a small amount from the chamber to the crown getting tighter at the crown just what you want.

If your Ruger shoots good, good ammo selection or hand loading will make more of a difference than some magical barrel treatment.

The Tubs treatment was developed back in the day when most barrels had tool marks and as they fouled the accuracy dropped. Very few rifles these days need the treatment.

Best regards,

Roadie
 

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The evidence I would suggest is found in the practices followed by those at the top in the business.

No barrel maker sells fire-lapped barrels, many sell properly hand lapped barrels. There's a reason for that.

Lapping with bullets ensures that you will round off the sharp edges in your barrel. That sounds great, until you recall that your rifle barrel is supposed to have sharp edges - namely - the rifling.

If I lap anything these days, I do hand lapping. Yes, it takes time and effort above and beyond fire lapping, but yes, there's a marked difference in the results it yields vs. fire lapping.
 
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