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"The Real Deal"
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I've noticed that .223 seems much more readily available than 5.56 NATO at the brick & mortar shop where I've been buying ammo.

Ruger's page for my rifle model says that either will work, but I'm wondering how much difference there is, and are there any caveats I should be aware of?
Not really alot of differences, the .223 rem round is known to be more accurate in rhe 223 rem, and 223 wylde rifles. The chamber is tighter. The wylde allows the use of either .223 rem or 5.56 also. The nato 5.56 chamber is fairly accurate too. However a handload .223 tuned to the rifle is by far the most accurate, seeings how you control the quality, and all will be exactly the same. Factory ammo is made with a high and low spec and as long as it falls into that production range its sold, if its outta the production range its not, so you get variances in bullet seating depth, and case over all length. They are all safe to shoot, it just can effect the accuracy due to variances. But never shoot 5.56 nato in a rifle chambered in .223 remington only since it will create an over pressure situation due to the cut of the chamber and cartridge dimensions at the neck.

I stay away from steel case for my ar's, I found the tula .223 does not have enough powder charge to completely eject and strip another round from the magazine, making the ar a bolt gun basically. I tried it in several of my ar's with the same results, did not function in my standard mini 14 either.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Thanks Tacky.

I've already decided to stay away from steel case ammo since seeing a few clips on YouTube where it caused various problems with that model.

I checked out the sites you mentioned, one of which has the Frontier 75gr in 5.56 I'd been looking for, so I should be able to keep up my ammo stock until I get into reloading. 馃檪

I have a co-worker who wants to eliminate some feral hogs on his land, so I'll be researching 75gr bthp vs 55gr as far as expansion and velocity.

It'll be a good opportunity to see what my rig can really do. 馃榿
 

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You can shoot any ammunition with a 223 Rem head stamp in a barrel with a 223 chamber, a 5.56 NATO chamber, or a 223 Wylde chamber. Since your rifle has a 5.56 NATO chamber you can choose between either 5.56x45 mm or .223 Remington ammunition.

There is not guarantee that any particular variety of .223 Remington ammunition will be either more or less powerful, or more or less accurate than ammunition loaded with the same projectile bearing a 5.56 head stamp. Only be experimentation can you determine what your particular barrel likes best. When you do, buy whatever works and is cheapest regardless of head stamp.

Some manufacturers produce and sell ammunition head stamped .223 Rem and 5.56 that are loaded with the same exact projectile and have exactly the same published specs. I have shot such ammunition using the same rifle and found no difference in accuracy, reliability, or apparent POI.
 

"The Real Deal"
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Thanks Tacky.

I've already decided to stay away from steel case ammo since seeing a few clips on YouTube where it caused various problems with that model.

I checked out the sites you mentioned, one of which has the Frontier 75gr in 5.56 I'd been looking for, so I should be able to keep up my ammo stock until I get into reloading. 馃檪

I have a co-worker who wants to eliminate some feral hogs on his land, so I'll be researching 75gr bthp vs 55gr as far as expansion and velocity.

It'll be a good opportunity to see what my rig can really do. 馃榿
Although you can shoot any rounds at hogs, or any animal for that matter, probably best results would be like the hornady ftx tipped rounds, barnes tsx tipped rounds, nosler accubond tipped rounds, or others that are bonded. They are made to penetrate and retain their weight from 80 % to 95%. Hogs are tough, so I would stay away from fragmenting rounds like the vmax, or blitzkings since they may seperate on impact and not dump its full energy deep inside a hog. Those bullets are usually used for varmints with not as tough skin, foxes, coyotes, woodchucks, etc.

I use a 25-45 sharps for hogs, its a .223 remington case that has had the neck of the case blownout to hold a 25 caliber bullet. I load a 117 gain interbond hornady on them. Basically everything on my ar is the same as a normal ar15 but barrel is a 25 caliber or .257. This allows 40% or more energy on the target with the same felt recoil. I also load a 90 grain sierra hpfb for that rifle thats moving pretty good too. Hopefully soon I can try the newest 450 bushmaster I just built on hogs with its 250 grain bonded bullets.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Wow! I was thinking about trying the Frontier 77gr bthp for the hogs, but I'll look for the Barnes or Hornady rounds suggested from local shops. I'm guessing 70gr would maintain better velocity/penetration?
 

"The Real Deal"
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Wow! I was thinking about trying the Frontier 77gr bthp for the hogs, but I'll look for the Barnes or Hornady rounds suggested from local shops. I'm guessing 70gr would maintain better velocity/penetration?
Well, not necessarily the heavier rounds usually run a bit slower than the lighter ones. Penetration is more about bullet design, bonded holds together better than thin skinned bullets that are not. Kind of like choosing the right tool for the job really. My 55 grainers usually run around 3000 fps. The 75's I shoot are 2500 to 2600 fps, but those are bthp match bullets and fmj bt cannlures.

I also look into the Hornady gmx, or gilding metal expanding, they are a bonded type bullet that retains its weight, should work well on hogs.
 

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One of the downsides to running steel ammo is......it doesn鈥檛 expand and seal the chamber way brass does, that said it runs dirtier. It also doesn鈥檛 spring back the same way brass does. A dirty chamber and a steel case that doesn鈥檛 contract like the others equals a stuck case.

Steel cases run great in an AK, but they were designed to run steel. Take an AR and an AK and throw them both in a mud puddle and see which one still shoots......it鈥檒l be the AK, they have looser tolerances.
 

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Welcome from Illinois.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
One of the downsides to running steel ammo is......it doesn鈥檛 expand and seal the chamber way brass does, that said it runs dirtier. It also doesn鈥檛 spring back the same way brass does. A dirty chamber and a steel case that doesn鈥檛 contract like the others equals a stuck case.

Steel cases run great in an AK, but they were designed to run steel. Take an AR and an AK and throw them both in a mud puddle and see which one still shoots......it鈥檒l be the AK, they have looser tolerances.
Still wishing I hadn't sold my SKS years ago. That woulda been nice to have around.
 

"The Real Deal"
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One of the downsides to running steel ammo is......it doesn鈥檛 expand and seal the chamber way brass does, that said it runs dirtier. It also doesn鈥檛 spring back the same way brass does. A dirty chamber and a steel case that doesn鈥檛 contract like the others equals a stuck case.

SteelSteeles run great in an AK, but they were designed to run steel. Take an AR and an AK and throw them both in a mud puddle and see which one still shoots......it鈥檒l be the AK, they have looser tolerances.

True that, only run steel in my 3 ak pattern rifles, and sks, never a failure. You know the uzi was also designed with real loose tolerances sa e as the ak, why I own one of the too, the original in 9mm and have the 45 conversion for it too. Alot of fun.
 

"The Real Deal"
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Still wishing I hadn't sold my SKS years ago. That woulda been nice to have around.

I picked up a yugo 59/66 from a friend that needed some cash, gave $200 for it, very accurate rifle despite the long creepy trigger. Mine is as issued still, no need for extra detachable mags, synthetic stocks and what have you. Fine as is.
 

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I picked up a yugo 59/66 from a friend that needed some cash, gave $200 for it, very accurate rifle despite the long creepy trigger. Mine is as issued still, no need for extra detachable mags, synthetic stocks and what have you. Fine as is.
Tacky, back in the early 90鈥檚 my buddy鈥檚 gun shop came across a boat load of SKS鈥....$79 bucks. At that price he said if the weapon fails, just use it as a 鈥渂eat stick鈥.
 

"The Real Deal"
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Tacky, back in the early 90鈥檚 my buddy鈥檚 gun shop came across a boat load of SKS鈥....$79 bucks. At that price he said if the weapon fails, just use it as a 鈥渂eat stick鈥.
I remember in the early 90's the local Roses store had them for around that, maybe $90, packed full of cosmoline. Believe they were chinese, but can't remember. Its crazy to see the prices they command now isn't it? :eek: In my travels I think my sks is more accurate than my ak rifles.
 

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As a new gun owner the popular advice I constantly see is to keep an AR wet. I even see people on this thread say keep it dripping. Meanwhile I see veterans say not to over oil them like the video linked below.

I bought an AR-556 MPR, and noticed the manual didn't really get into cleaning or a break-in process. Following suggestions on this forum, and youtube, I broke it down, cleaned it and made sure it was well oiled. Taking it out for the first time, it shot excellently but wouldn't feed using Federal American Eagle 223 FMJ.

I broke it down, and dry swabbed the BCG, and throat completely and the gun suddenly worked great with no issues!

Though it's in the title, and he does talk a little about LSA, the point of this video is about cleaning and oiling an AR. Not that you should use LSA.

 

"The Real Deal"
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As a new gun owner the popular advice I constantly see is to keep an AR wet. I even see people on this thread say keep it dripping. Meanwhile I see veterans say not to over oil them like the video linked below.

I bought an AR-556 MPR, and noticed the manual didn't really get into cleaning or a break-in process. Following suggestions on this forum, and youtube, I broke it down, cleaned it and made sure it was well oiled. Taking it out for the first time, it shot excellently but wouldn't feed using Federal American Eagle 223 FMJ.

I broke it down, and dry swabbed the BCG, and throat completely and the gun suddenly worked great with no issues!

Though it's in the title, and he does talk a little about LSA, the point of this video is about cleaning and oiling an AR. Not that you should use LSA.

Valid points. I do believe on heavy oil until it breaks in. I can see military guys saying the opposite since if oiled good, and your in the sandbox, its gonna attract dirt like putting on sunscreen. and laying on beach sand. I also do not recommend heavy oil if the firearm is on Defense duty since keeping a round in the chamber with oil, the oil can migrate into the round and cause it to fail to go bang. But i would not have a bnib ar on defense duty, or any other until it had proven itself and had a few hundred rounds through it.
When i take an AR to the range, its bolt is wet.

Obviously this is gross lubrication, but it does prove a valid point.

 
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here's how to clean and lube your AR-15

 
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"The Real Deal"
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Only thing is, i missed the whole process of disassembly of the ar15. :love:
and how come my gunsmiths have never looked like Ashley?
 

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