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After some good reading based on the help of everyone on this forum I'd like to put up the following caliber/ powder combinations and see what you folks think.

I have the following powders on my shelf.

8LB of CFE Pistol
3LB of HP-38
5LB of Titegroup.

My chocies are limited since I live in NJ and there are maybe one or two shops that have powder. Other than that I have to order it. So, I'm limited to purchasing what was available.

If I understand everything correctly CFE Pistol is a mid range burning powder while Titegroup is a fast burning powder and HP-38 falls somewhere between Titegroup and CFE Pistol. As a result am Correctly using the powders as follows:

CFE Pistol:
45 ACP
6.3 Grains of powder
230 Grain X-treme RN Plated bullets
Large pistol primer
COL 1.200"
Pistol: Ruger SR1911 5" Barrel

9MM Luger
5.2 Grains of Powder
124 Grain X-treme RN Plated bullet
Small Pistol Primer
COL 1.150"
Pistol Beretta PX4 Storm Compact 3.1" barrel

___________________________

HP-38
.38 Special
4.8 Grains of Powder
125 Grain X-treme Flat Nose Plated bullets
Small Pistol Primer
COL 1.455"
Revolver Ruger GP100 4" Barrel

___________________________

As for the Titegroup I'm not sure which way to go with this powder as from what I have read it's perhaps not the best choice for 9mm or 45 ACP. I do admit that if I could get my hands on another 8LB of CFE I would sell the HP-38 and Titegroup as CFE pistol seems to work very well for 45 ACP, 9MM and .38 Special.
 

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Tite group works very nicely in 38 special. I load 3.4 grains under a 158gr xtreme bullet for a light plinking round. Same charge works for an xtreme 125gr in 38 special and has minimal recoil. I have been loading 5.3gr of CFE Pistol with 124gr Xtreme bullets. I load mine a wee bit shorter at 1.145 OAL.
 

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Discussion Starter #4

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rojasj, Please read my article in the Forum Library titled: "The Mysteries of Smokeless Gunpowder". There are applications and suggestions that should meet your needs and answer your questions.

Here's a link: http://rugerforum.net/library/29181-mysteries-smokeless-gunpowder.html
I highly recommend anyone considering using H-110/296 to read page 12 the section SQUIBS.

Most experts are very keen on the rule "Don't go below manufacturers specified minimum charges" when it comes to 110/296.

H 110 and WW 296 used to be somewhat similar but not identical I'm told, which is why older reloading manuals show different charges for the two powders. Nowadays, I'm told they are the same and come from the same foreign maker, being distributed in USA by Hodgdon. This is one good reason to use the latest reloading manuals and/or the manufacturers website database.

Radio George
 

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After some good reading based on the help of everyone on this forum I'd like to put up the following caliber/ powder combinations and see what you folks think.

I have the following powders on my shelf.

8LB of CFE Pistol
3LB of HP-38
5LB of Titegroup.

My chocies are limited since I live in NJ and there are maybe one or two shops that have powder. Other than that I have to order it. So, I'm limited to purchasing what was available.

If I understand everything correctly CFE Pistol is a mid range burning powder while Titegroup is a fast burning powder and HP-38 falls somewhere between Titegroup and CFE Pistol. As a result am Correctly using the powders as follows:

CFE Pistol:
45 ACP
6.3 Grains of powder
230 Grain X-treme RN Plated bullets
Large pistol primer
COL 1.200"
Pistol: Ruger SR1911 5" Barrel

9MM Luger
5.2 Grains of Powder
124 Grain X-treme RN Plated bullet
Small Pistol Primer
COL 1.150"
Pistol Beretta PX4 Storm Compact 3.1" barrel

___________________________

HP-38
.38 Special
4.8 Grains of Powder
125 Grain X-treme Flat Nose Plated bullets
Small Pistol Primer
COL 1.455"
Revolver Ruger GP100 4" Barrel

___________________________

As for the Titegroup I'm not sure which way to go with this powder as from what I have read it's perhaps not the best choice for 9mm or 45 ACP. I do admit that if I could get my hands on another 8LB of CFE I would sell the HP-38 and Titegroup as CFE pistol seems to work very well for 45 ACP, 9MM and .38 Special.
To answer this specifically, I send you to the Hodgdon's online reloading data center, where you can check your proposed loading data against their recommendations.

Some cartridge loads are listed as "RUGER ONLY", this does not included the new model Vaquero. When loading such +P and ++P loads, be sure to label them so your heirs don't blow up their plastic guns in the far future.

Hodgdon Reloading | Home

Radio George
 

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>H 110 and WW 296 used to be somewhat similar but not identical I'm told

Untrue. What they saw was the difference in lot numbers and not any difference in the powder. Lot numbers vary. H110 and W296 always came for the same blend (or so Hodgdon has admitted). Win and Hodgdon got the powders from the same factory and from the same lots.

.45 Auto: does best with a fast powder. TiteGroup is popular, but in my guns not even close to the top 5 for accuracy. My most accurate .45 Auto powder is 231/HP38, followed by Bullseye, Red Dot, and AA2.
.38 Spl: also does best with fast powder. My most accurate loads are with AA2, followed by Bullseye, Red Dot, and 231/HP38.
9x19: here is where your CFE pistol may be great. Never used it. Don't think I even have a manual with load data for it or a
"burn rate" chart that shows it.
Most accurate 9x19 powder I have found is Power Pistol, followed by Silhouette and True Blue. 9x19 seems to be most accurate from mid-range to almost MAX loads using a relatively slow powder. My 9x19s have never done well with any powder much faster than AA5.
Have you worked these loads up from start or are you assuming?
The COL from Hodgdon should be considered the minimum COL for that data and NOT a recommended COL. 1.200" for .45 Auto is quite short, though I have certainly seen shorter with button-nose SWCs.
Before you load any, check with a couple of inert dummy rounds that a COL that short actually feeds and chambers in your gun. A COL of 1.220" will usually work fine, but all guns have slightly different chambers/throats/ledes.
Next, a plated bullet should be loaded like a lead bullet (unless it has a plating as thick as jacketed bullets--and the manufacturer recommends using jacketed date) and your load is 0.1gn over Hodgdon's max load for a lead bullet, so I hope you have worked up the load and not just decided that is what you want.
Never assume that your gun and mix of component lot numbers will be that similar to what the test lab found with their gun and component lot numbers. This is why the all recommend ONLY starting with the start load and working up. They may claim theirs is the "best" manual, but they still emphasis starting at the start load.
 

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I highly recommend anyone considering using H-110/296 to read page 12 the section SQUIBS.

Most experts are very keen on the rule "Don't go below manufacturers specified minimum charges" when it comes to 110/296.

H 110 and WW 296 used to be somewhat similar but not identical I'm told, which is why older reloading manuals show different charges for the two powders. Nowadays, I'm told they are the same and come from the same foreign maker, being distributed in USA by Hodgdon. This is one good reason to use the latest reloading manuals and/or the manufacturers website database.

Radio George

H110/296 are made in St Marks.
 

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">H 110 and WW 296 used to be somewhat similar but not identical I'm told.

Untrue"

At one time, Winchester-Western made propellant. Hodgdon's on the other hand did not, but resold military surplus ammo. It wasn't until 2006 that the two reached a licensing agreement, leaving Hodgdon to sell "both". I put "both" in quotes since there may never have been two different manufacturers, but everyone will agree that when ball powder was first introduced to the civilian market in the 1960's, there were constant changes, improvements and upgrades to the manufacturing process, leaving today's product possibly quite different than a particular batch from years ago.

Also as reloaders we are warned not to blend powders for safety reasons. This I do agree with, but in fact, manufacturers of cartridges have always blended propellants to give them an "edge". Their vast resources made testing a sane and safe process, unlike the basement tinkerer's nil resources in that area.

Radio George
 
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