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Exchequer
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Discussion Starter #21
A Vet affirmed what I knew. DO NOT feed your pets any of your human food. She deals day in and out with diabetes, cancer and other people diseases!!! Get it?
With all due respect to your vet friend, and as someone who had owned and operated a "health food store for dogs and cats" for a decade, I have to disagree.

Dogs and cats today have the same physiology and biology as they have had for thousands of years. While we may have domesticated them in terms of their behaviors, we have not domesticated or altered their biology. The best diet for dogs and cats was designed by Mother Nature, not by a corporation, not by Rachel Ray, and certainly not by a vet. Most vets have about as much nutritional training as our own doctors have; that is to say- none to speak of. Personally, when it comes to diet, I trust Mother Nature over a vet any day

The fact of the matter is that ALL dry pet food is, by its very nature, the most processed type of food out there. And all things equal, the more processed a food is, the worse it is for a body.

My dog (going on17 years in September), ate a raw diet his whole life - until last year when he just got too old to reasonably digest the raw proteins. He now eats "people food"; a mixture of cooked meats or poultry with some veggies and barley. He gets no wheat, corn, soy, artificial colors, or "flavors". I don't use toxic flea and tick meds on him and aside from typical age-related issues, he's doing pretty darn well.

I would suggest that there is no such thing as "people food" and "dog food", there is only food. It is either appropriate for a dog or cat or it is not.

Sorry for the rant, but this is something I know about deeply and for which I have a passion.

 

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Grand Inquisitor
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The fact of the matter is that ALL dry pet food is, by its very nature, the most processed type of food out there. And all things equal, the more processed a food is, the worse it is for a body.
I agree, and in the Old Country, where my Turkish ancestors raised their livestock dogs, the perfect diet was a barley stew and bits of game, when the latter was available. Our dogs, like theirs, roam far and work all day, never coming indoors.

Given the quantity of food that Anatolian Shepherds consume, it is hard to avoid kibble, but in consultation with dog fanatics, I picked out premium and expensive brands. Most supermarket brands, while better than what I fed pets decades ago, are not optimal.

Yet the dogs need more: we supplement their food with raw or dehydrated meat, often organ meats. The older pup gets a senior vitamin, daily. When I can get rabbits to breed in the brush piles on the edges of the woods, a-hunting I will go for more protein of the dogs and our chickens.

It might differ for house pets.
 

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I am bad and apologize ahead...........the thread above this one is. “Has anyone noticed?
” And then we have ‘barefoot in the kitchen’. I’’m sorry, not really, my mind just went in another direction.
 

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I have always enjoyed baking but am not a sweet-tooth person. Being at home "more than usual" for the past 8 weeks, last week I found this absolutely yummy treat. I am not hijacking this thread: The woman who put this recipe on line swears it is the only people food her dog will steal if he gets a chance -- so it fits with the dog treat theme - sort of.

For those of us who are gluten intolerant it is a fantastic treat - for those of you who can eat wheat flour it is a fantastic treat. So there. Tapioca flour is inexpensive and should be available in most grocery stores. Look for the Bob's Mill products. Actually I just bought a case of 4 one pound bags from VitaCost for only $10 which is a really good deal if you use much of it, which I do.

CHEESE PUFFS

1 large egg beaten well with a fork
2/3 C. milk or milk substitute (almond, soy, etc.)
1/3 C. oil (NOT CANOLA OR "Vegetable oil" - use rice bran oil, grapeseed oil or olive oil!)
1 C. of soft white cheese, such as mozzarella, shredded - at room temperature
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. sugar or agave
1 1/2 C. tapioca flour (also called yuca or cassava flour)
1 tsp. baking powder, aluminum free
oven spray
2 mini-muffin pans ( or 1 regular "12 hole" muffin pan)

Preheat oven to 400º - makes 12 regular "cupcake size" puffs or 24 mini puffs

Place egg in very warm water to bring to a bit warmer than room temperature. Measure the milk and oil, and heat until warm in a microwave or on the stove.

Place the salt, sugar, baking powder and tapioca flour in a blender, -OR- I USE a 4 CUP MEASURING cup and a stick blender. Mix together.

When the oven is hot, add the cheese, then the egg, and last the oil and milk. Blend until a smooth batter forms. If VERY thick, add a Tbsp. or more of milk.

Spray muffin tins. Fill mini pans to the rim; if any are left empty add a couple Tbsp of water to each empty one. If using full size pans divide batter evenly among 12 "cups."

Place in oven for 12 minutes or a little longer; they are done when very puffy and starting to brown around the top edges. Let sit on a rack a bit before dumping out onto a rack or clean dish towels and eat while they are still warm. If any are left, seal in something, refrigerate and reheat briefly in a microwave.

NOTE: THESE PUFF UP SUPER HIGH when baking, but then sink back down after they are out of the oven. This is normal. They are cheesy/gooey delights, with a meal or any old time.
 

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Could be worse ways to shelter in place. You will gain the covid-15 for sure that way. :)
 
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