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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All
I was woundering I just got my mini 14 tactical back from ruger they replaced the barrel I've heard of a barrel break in I tried it with the AR and I spent about 3 hours or more at the range I notice no difference in shooting a 100 or even 200 yards has anyone done this with a mini or should I not waste my time doing that and get myself a good scope and go with that
Thanks
Jim
 

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Here we go.....

My two cents is it's a waste of time. Others are going to chime in and swear it's extremely important. Most guns will shoot better after you've put a few rounds down range. By better I mean more consistent than when they are brand new. The groups will tighten up a bit but no amount of 'break in' is going to turn a 2 MOA gun into a 1 MOA gun. It's just not. I suspect that most of the improvement the pro-break in crowd obtains is just the barrel seasoning a bit. They would have achieved the exact same improvement by shooting 50 rounds in row as they did by shooting 3 and cleaning. YMMV.

This is a good read and it's by none other than Gale McMillan himself. I suspect he might know a thing or two about rifle barrels.

http://www.6mmbr.com/gailmcmbreakin.html
 

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This issue is talked about a lot. Everyone has their own opinion.

But, I use Brasso and a plastic brush to shine up new or old barrels I suspect as being rough. There is also JB Bore Bright. This seems to take the rough out of the barrels. (old military barrels can have some real issues with rough and copper filled) I noticed that when I ran a brush or bore snake through my factory Mini barrels there was a little "shwish" sound while the bores on some of my other rifles were silent. I can only attribute that to the barrel having a rough internal finish.

You can also do this after your first firing. Brasso has ammonia in it and it will reduce the amount of copper left in the barrel. I can't tell you it will take it all out but it will turn a brush blue if you have "a lot". I think you will find this supplements or maybe even replaces a break in period.
kwg
 

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jimkok, I think we all fall prey to "old wives tales", especially if they seem to work. When I was much younger, I was told to break in a new barrel by shooting 3 rounds, clean the bore thoroughly, then shoot 3 more, clean and repeat until you have fired 20 rounds. Some people did the same basic regimen only in one round increments while others did a 1 round, 3 round, 5 round regimen. It always appeared to work ... groups shrunk a little but appeared to settle down after about 15 to 20 rounds. Years later, a friend told me he always "broke in" his new barrels when zeroing a scope and shooting some 3-round confirmation groups. This also amounted to shooting about 20 rounds and you could actually see the groups tighten until about 15 to 20 rounds had been fired ..... the difference being .... the bore wasn't cleaned until the range trip was over.

In 1973, I went to gunsmith school where the "old wives tale" was debunked. The truth is ... nearly all factory barrels (not match grade or custom built) have minor irregularities from the manufacturing process that seem to "iron out" after several rounds have been fired .... no matter if the barrel is cleaned after each round, every few rounds or after a range trip. So .... there is some truth to "break-in" but it doesn't require any special regimen ... just shoot a box of 20 and you should be good to go. BTW, I still use my friends routine of break-in during scope zero-in ... it kills two birds with one stone.

Something I learned from the "old bench rest guys" back when I was a "young guy" .... all barrels shoot tighter groups after they have been "fouled" by shooting 2 or 3 rounds. In reality, what happens is .... the striation marks left in the bore during the manufacturing process act much like a file and remove a slight amount of soft gilding metal (bullet jackets). This does two things ... the first being a bullet damaged by the striation marks will not fly perfectly straight, and the second thing is .... gilding metal will actually fill the striations and make the bore much smoother, thus reducing bullet damage. When you clean a bore (assuming you do a good job), most of the gilding metal is removed, which again exposes striation marks. No problem .... just shoot a few "fouling rounds" before you compete and groups will tighten. For hunting, not a big deal because the striations don't affect accuracy enough to make a difference on a deer's kill zone.
 

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I understand that this video was suppose to be a joke, but the first time he threw the rifle to the ground I got sick to my stomach. Why do people treat there rifles in such manor? :confused: It just sickens me to see a rifle (any rifle) to be treated this way.

Oh and dont worry about break in, just shoot the damn thing
 

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I understand that this video was suppose to be a joke, but the first time he threw the rifle to the ground I got sick to my stomach. Why do people treat there rifles in such manor? :confused: It just sickens me to see a rifle (any rifle) to be treated this way.

Oh and dont worry about break in, just shoot the damn thing
The first time he threw it down, I started to giggle. I knew where the video was going from there. Use it like you swiped it was the old saying we had when I was a young buck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the good input I think I will break it in while am sighting it in and I agree about that video when I saw him throw it the first time must be nice to throw away good money that way
 

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The first time he threw it down, I started to giggle. I knew where the video was going from there. Use it like you swiped it was the old saying we had when I was a young buck.
Yeah, we say "drive it like you stole it" down here, and it still is an ignorant "saying"
 

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Yeah, we say "drive it like you stole it" down here, and it still is an ignorant "saying"
Yes, that's maybe why I was an 11 year Corporal in the Cdn Army.
back to the subject at hand. I was brought up on the theory of needing to shoot a few hundred rounds down range with a new gun. Partially for the gun to "break in" and for the user to get used to the gun.
 

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Yes, just shoot it and it will break in fine. The most I will do is fire 40 or 50 rounds at the range, go home and swab out the bore, then run a patch with J-B finishing compound ( the red stuff, not the tan, the red is milder and less abrasive) through the bore several times. Then a patch with solvent to make sure all the J-B is cleaned out.
 

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Thanks for the good input I think I will break it in while am sighting it in and I agree about that video when I saw him throw it the first time must be nice to throw away good money that way
On a new (or any) weapon I stay away from mag dumps and a close eye on overheating the barrel. If I can't hold the barrel with a light glove on, it's getting too hot.

Old habit, I also clean the weapon after I shoot it.
 

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I run a patch through the barrel to make sure theres nothing in there from the factory ,( ya never know ). Then shoot it and clean it when your done.
 
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