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Discussion Starter #1
A few years ago I read an article written by a guy teaching people to shoot. He said bearing grease is the best long lasting lubricant for guns.
It also good to use for people who keep guns in safe for many years. Bearing grease will never dry out.
Plastic guns with almost no frame rails(small tabs instead) definitely need better lubrication.
Who uses bearing grease?
 

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Beating grease for bearing, motor oil for motors, gun grease for guns.......simple enough for me. :cool:

ETA; I only use a dab of 鈥済un grease鈥 on my lugs.
 

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Stop and think about it .... grease is used when there is high pressure friction surfaces, usually rated in thousands of psi .... ie wheel bearings on a car, gears in a transmission, or constant load bearing surfaces like steering linkage. I don't know of any gun that has more than 25 psi in any part of the gun except the bore or chambers. As such, you don't need or want anything that will stay sticky and attract dirt and abrasive powder residue. In many cases, grease contaminated with very sharp and hard carbon particles will cause much more wear than if no lubricant is used.

I never use grease on any of my pistols, rifles, or revolvers. The exception ..... In the past, I had a Springfield M1 Garand where I use a dab of grease on the oprod.

A very light film of oil on all steel parts is all you need. It's mostly for rust prevention but it does have limited lubrication qualities. The surface of parts feel wet .... you used too much oil.

Here's my old Series 70 Colt MK IV Govt Model that I bought new in the 70's. Over the years, it's had in excess of 50,000 FMJ rounds down the pipe before the rifling in the bore got so thin, it wouldn't spin bullets. A new barrel put it back in tack driver condition. All I've ever done with this gun is to clean it after each shooting session and apply a dot of oil on each part then spread it out until the part feels dry. All my other guns get the same treatment, however none of them have as high of a round count as my old Series 70.

 

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Discussion Starter #5
Good looking 1911 and interesting story about 50k rounds.
Nothing else was worn out?
It seems like you replaced hammer and rear safety, probably just to make it look better. You can probably sell it for 5x more than you paid.
 

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car5car, Yes, I replaced many parts and used this 1911 for hard ball NRA bullseye matches. The straight mainspring housing was replaced with an arched housing. The grip safety was replaced with a beavertail grip safety. The spur hammer was replaced with a skeletonized hammer. The trigger was replaced with a longer trigger. The thumb safety and slide lock were replaced with extended parts and of course the grip were replaced with rubber Pachmayer finger groove grips. The sights were replaced with 3-dot Bomar adjustable sights. All of these mods were done at least 30 years ago .... probably longer. The slide and frame were reblued twice. The key issue is .... the slide, frame, and the rest of the internal parts are original Colt parts that show minimal wear and are still well within spec. I paid $92 for the basic gun over 44 years ago. It's worth about 10X that amount today.
 

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Since I restore old cars and do a lot of DIY maintenance, I want to weigh in. Bearing grease is incredibly viscous. It is great for the sorts of forces that wheel bearings experience, but it is just too thick for a gun鈥檚 rail. Even body-to-frame bushings get a lighter weight grease, and they slide back in forth at speed, more like a gun鈥檚 slide.

My 1911 has only fired about 5k rounds since 2001, and it looks great still. Hoppes or another similar product are all I use, and very sparingly.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The guy who wrote the article was watching his students, shooting thousands of rounds a day. So he watched guns malfunctioning a lot. He said about bearing grease. I also used synthetic engine oil.
 

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I learned it grease what slides and oil what rotates. I use Mil Comm TW-25B on the rails and outside of the BBL's of my semi auto's. A very small amount and spread evenly with the finger is all I use. I am 2 years into a 1 1/2 oz tube and still going strong.
 

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I have tried it, sparingly. Applied in tiny amounts with a Q-Tip, it will work, but I would imagine it would tend to attract And hold dirt, and for that reason I don鈥檛 use it.
 

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Only weapns grease I used was GAA (Grease automotive and artillery) and that was on a howitzer. even the M2 .50 machine gun only got CLP and I assure you the pressure on the surfaces are far greater than any pistol or rifle. In the desert grease is completely avoided as it turns into grinding compound.. DON'T USE GREASE
 

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I always find this topic amazing in that it comes up at all.
If there is a tried and true method that clearly works, why change it?
Some people talk about the cost of gun lubricant vs motor oils. As I have gone through about 2 bottles of gun oil in 10 years (part of that spillage), I don't get the argument. My cheapest gun was $200 in 1997 (Mossberg 500); my most expensive $800. I would have to go through a LOT of gun oil to think I was spending a lot vs the investment in the firearms themselves (I have 9 at about a total of $5,000)
Some people just want to reinvent the wheel so to speak.

Not really looking for any hate mail, I just wanted to point out that I kind of chuckle as I read some of these threads. I actually have used CLP and Ballistol as cleaners, but I always end with a few drops of Hoppes gun oil.
 

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Went through BCT at Ft. Polk, LA in 67. We had M-14鈥檚. Used NO grease. Only military gun oil. The old stuff before Breakfree. Those basic training rifles were shot thousands of times over their life span. Taken apart and cleaned after every firing session. Bolt roller was never greased, only oiled. And still it was not hard to hit a 300 meter pop up target with one. The M-14/M1A is an inherent accurate rifle even after thousands of rounds and hundreds of cleanings. And cleaning from the muzzle end.
 

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First off, as a mechanic in my previous career, grease is not just meant for areas that are under severe loading. Grease is for areas where oils will not stay in place. That is why you see grease in places like ball joints, steering components, universal joints, CV joints....etc.

You see oil in engines and transmissions. It takes a much better sealing system to keep oil where it belongs. Oil relies on pressure and film strength to seperate parts from each other.

I definitely use grease on my gun rails. All of them. I have a small tub of gun grease and like it because it seems to be cleaner. But, I would use any high temperature wheel bearing grease on my slide rails before I would use gun oil.
 

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Key to using bearing grease is u have to pack that slide just like u do a bearing.

Ok, got that off my chest.

Use whatever u want. If it works for ya, great, if not change it. In 30 years and thousands of rounds through handguns I've never used any type of grease. I think I'll stick with what I've been using.

These threads always seem to pick up a good head of steam.
 

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Ok, here is the million dollar question. If you look at my other posts in threads on the exact same topic, gun products for guns, auto products for autos, etc. Basic ingredients might be the same or not. Don鈥檛 care. Auto products might be cheaper. Don鈥檛 care. Even with the most expensive gun product I can find, we are still talking about mere fractions of a cent, an almost incalculable cost. So, granted some oils might not stay in place as much as one would want, and some grease might attract more crud, but those example (and not limited to) can be recognized and overcome with oiling more frequently, cleaning and re-greasing for instance. So, has anyone actually used a lube, regardless of intended use, that actually failed?


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I will try for the prize......yes, I have. Depending on how you define failure.

I still work on a lot of vehicles. Mine and others, for free and for fun money. Anyway, I ran oil analyses on my cars and diesel tractor years ago to tell when a conventional motor oil "fails" versus when a synthetic oil does. That way I had a basis (beyond just guessing) to decide how long I wanted to stretch out oil change intervals. The synthetics maintain their lubrication properties far longer than conventional oils. Like 2 times longer.

These debates rage on internet sites devoted to vehicle maintenance.

So, maybe we should talk about guns. I was an early adopter of using grease on my aluminum framed guns. The steel slide rails were removing the anodizing on the aluminum frame slide surfaces. With grease, the anodizing stays intact much better than with oil, assuming similar levels of neglect. I am a gun shooter and do not look forward to cleaning them beyond a wipe down for corrosion.
 
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