Ruger Forum banner

21 - 26 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,855 Posts
I have the Tomcat Inox. My very favorite carry gun. The frame cracking issue can be avoided by not shooting ammo with a muzzle energy over 130 ft./lbs. (basically .32 ammo over 71 grain).

My Tomcat is very accurate, super reliable, and fun to carry and shoot.

[/url]
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,223 Posts
Having multiple Bobcats in .22 and .25 the Tomcat appealed to me even with the known issue. It goes to the range every other month for 50 rounds, using ammo @ 130 ft.lbs.

If I had a cracked one I'd be peeved too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I purchased one of these the frame cracked. Beretta does not stand behind their product. Yea it "rarely" happens and is "misinformation?" Sure beretta keep selling junk and blaming the ammo. Mine was blue anyone know if the stainless would be stronger?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
In my opinion, Beretta is clearly at fault - trying to blame the ammo is not really honest.

That is because the "newer ammo that started to be loaded hotter" is actually "the way European ammo makers have always loaded the 7.65 Browning (.32 Auto)!"

My Mauser model 1914 (late 1921 mfgr date) loves the S&B 177 ft-lbs ammo - much more than the way it tolerates the weak 130 ft-lbs US-standard ammo!

All of the older European 7.65 Br pistols also do well with the European ammo - its what they were designed for, after all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Note however, that there is one newer "European" 7.65 Br pistol that does have a safety issue... NOT ammo-related!

Walther PPK/S-1 .32

PPK PPK/S RECALL
Important Safety Recall – FEBRUARY 2013 PPK & PPK/S

Smith & Wesson has identified a condition that may exist in certain PPK and PPK/S pistols which may permit a round to be discharged without the trigger being pulled. When the manual safety is disengaged, Smith & Wesson’s Product Engineering Group has determined that the possibility exists in certain firearms that lowering the hammer may cause a chambered round to fire.

This recall applies to all Walther PPK and PPK/S pistols manufactured by Smith & Wesson from March 21, 2002, until February 3, 2009. The Serial Numbers of the pistol subject to this recall are as follows:

0010BAB – 9999BAB
0000BAC – 9999BAC
0000BAD – 9999BAD
0000BAE – 9999BAE
0000BAF – 9999BAF
0000BAH – 9999BAH
0000BAJ – 9999BAJ
0000BAK – 9999BAK
0000BAL – 5313BAL
0000BAM – 1320BAM
0000LTD – 0499LTD
0001PPK – 1500PPK
0026REP – 0219REP
0001WLE – 0459WLE

STOP USING YOUR PISTOL AND RETURN IT AT ONCE. Any unintended discharge of a firearm has the potential for causing injury and we ask that you stop using your pistol immediately.

To facilitate the repair of your pistol please contact customer service to receive instructions. Upon receipt of your pistol, we will replace the existing hammer block with a new part at no cost to you. Your firearm will be returned as quickly and efficiently as possible.


When your pistol is returned, you should note a punch dot which appears at the back of the frame. See the photograph below.

This marking is verification that the new hammer block has been installed and that your pistol is safe to handle.

Please contact Walther Arms via phone (479) 242-8500 or email us using the Contact Us form if your PPK or PPK/S serial number is within the range of recalled guns. Our customer service team will provide you with an RA#, Return Form, and a PrePaid FedEx label.
145307
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,395 Posts
Note however, that there is one newer "European" 7.65 Br pistol that does have a safety issue... NOT ammo-related!
I've only seen the S&W version of the PPK in 9x17mm (.380). I'd buy a 7.65mm PPK if I found one.
 
21 - 26 of 26 Posts
Top