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I'm looking at getting a 22 target pistol to do some plinking, so I don't want the SR22. I'm thinking of a MK III or 22/45, I'd like one with removable grip panels so I can swap them out. Maybe a rail or capable of putting a rail on for a small optic.

What's everyone's opinion for the best Ruger 22 piston............dependability and performance?

Thanks,

Steve
 

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I was always partial to the Mark bull barrel pistols. I've had a Mark II Govt Target model since I bought it new in the 80s and I swear by it. Some folks don't like the grip angle so they opt for the 22/45. It's up to your personal taste...try them out before you buy if you get the chance.
 

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I've had a bunch of MKII's over the years and I don't think you can find a better .22 pistol for the money. I'd put the Ruger MKII up against just about any .22 pistol available.
A stock MKII is an outstanding gun and a slightly tricked out one is even better. A good MKII in the hands of a competent shooter will give a S&W model 41 and real run for the money.

Bill Ruger got the basics right with the standard pistol. The MKII added some small improvements. The basic design is incredibly durable, reliable and simple. The receiver is basically just a pipe that the barrel threads into. The fixed barrel doesn't move. The fixed receiver allows a long sight radius without the rear sight riding on a movable slide. The grip frame is two heavy steel stampings welded together to form the grip. It doesn't get much simpler or stronger than a MKII.

A lot of people underestimate the Ruger standard pistol , MKII and MKIII's. The quality of those pistols is much higher than the cost leads some to believe.

I've shot the Browning Buckmark, a few Colt Woodsmen pistols, a couple of S&W model 41's and a bunch of others. I would never give up a MKII.
 

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If you have the big bucks. This animal is the smoothest shooting .22 I have ever touched.

I have a 1953 vintage but she still punches nice tight groups.
 

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Ruger® 22/45™ Target Rimfire Pistol Model 10140

This is the one I'm liking the looks of.

I hear they are a real PITA to clean..........is that true? Why?
I have that pistol, and three other Ruger Mark Series pistols. For the money, there is nothing better. The Ruger is more accurate than you are.

People complain about dis/reassembly because there are pistols that are easier. The Ruger isnt that tough if you follow the procedure, and understand what needs done. I can strip my Ruger Mark pistols in less than 30 seconds, and reassemble them just as quickly. Its not that difficult. I compare it to changing the oil in your car. Many people can do it. There are some people who simply can not, and stripping/reassembling the Ruger pistol is the same.
 

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I hear they are a real PITA to clean..........is that true? Why?
Yes, one of the things MK pistols are known for is being a real #$%* to reassemble after field stripping. And I'm speaking as the owner of an MK III Standard that I bought NIB and ended up going through hell with. To make a LONG story short, I had a gunsmith install a Majestic Arms Speed Strip Kit on it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDcwDg2aTs8
 

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Ive kicked around getting a mark series. Just never happened.

Ive been very happy with my single six convertables. They are very accurate,, and easy to clean.
 

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A Ruger Mark III or 22/45 won't ever be a Pardini, Feinwerkbau, or Hammerli, or even a S&W 41, but for CASUAL target shooting with an expectation of , the Ruger Mark III and 22/45 and Browning Buckmark are the best options out there.

The preference between the 22/45 and the Mark III is subjective. I personally prefer the the Mark III (actually prefer Mark II the most), a little extra weight in hand, and a better grip feel for me. I have a pair of 22/45's also, but don't like them nearly as much.

One advantage, if you're a Bullseye shooter, in owning a 22/45 is the common grip frame shape to the 1911. Only really matters for beginning Bullseye shooters, since once you get a little ways down the road, you'll be able to outshoot a 22/45, and you'll also want to get an Ortho style grip (Vitarbo) for your rimfire, which you might not be able to use on your 1911 (depending upon class).

Both are optic ready in most models - meaning most of both are D&T'd for a base. Not all come with a base, but the bases are cheap.

Go hold both side by side, you'll be able to tell which your hand prefers.
 

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You can't go wrong with a 22/45. I've had mine for about 25 years. One practice I do is to switch back and forth between it and my 1911; it's a good way to reinforce best practices.
 

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I field stripped my Mk II Govt once when I first got it in 1987 and it was a nightmare. I've never taken it down since. After each range session, I just blast the whole action out with Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber and clean the bore out with Hoppes #9...oil it well and put it up 'til the next time. 28 years and thousands of rounds later, it's never failed me once....:D
 

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.... I hear they are a real PITA to clean..........is that true? Why?
Despite what you may have heard, once you learn the Mark Series field strip procedure and practice it a few times they are actually quite simple to clean. My MKIII512 is nearing 80,000 rounds down the pipe and generally gets field stripped and cleaned after each range appearance.
 

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Despite what you may have heard, once you learn the Mark Series field strip procedure and practice it a few times they are actually quite simple to clean. ...........
/\ I agree. /\

The reassembly procedure is more about understanding the relationship between the components than it is about following the directions. Once you understand how the parts interact it is simple to field strip and reassemble a Ruger .22 pistol.

The relationship between the hammer, hammer strut and the mainspring housing is the main issue when reassembling a Ruger Standard, MKII or MKIII. People are different and it doesn't "click" with everyone right away.
 

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Pardini SP Bullseye Edition = $2300.00
Feinwerkbau AW93 = $2475.00
Hammerli SP20 = $1750.00
S&W Model 41 = $1200.00
Used Ruger MKII = $500.00 +/- $100; Volquartsen Hammer, sear & trigger = $110.00


Just saying......
 

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I recommend the Ruger Mark II or Mark III if you want a good target or plinking pistol.

The S&W 617 is the best revolver if that interests you.

I like the Mark III over the 22/45 for the all-steel construction. Nothing wrong with the 22/45 though.

The Mark III is great with an optic.

 

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I went with the 22/45 and it has been a fun shooter. I really do not take it apart for cleaning, just flush it out and run a bor snake through it. I like the looks of the new lite models, while mine is not a lite model I do not find it heavy.
 
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