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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thinking of getting a 10/22 after having shot one a few times at the range. I mostly shoot indoors in 25 to 50 yd lanes although we have 100 yd lanes and am no better than lower average. Outdoor ranges are far away and inconvenient to get to.

But I've only been shooting a short time and almost all pistols, no rifles.

As many people seem to upgrade their 10/22s all the time, is there an out of the box Ruger that won't need any upgrades for a few years? Or are there a few high value upgrades that you would encourage nearly everyone to do?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Just to clarify, I'm not thinking of getting upgrades right away, but trying to understand the process by understanding what things matter and are highest value. It also helps me decide which gun to buy.
 

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Best two upgrades are good scope amd trigger. Shoot the daylights out of it. A 1022 barrel needs about 1000 rounds to really get broken in. The 1022 stock barrel can be surprisingly accurate.
Good optics , nice light crisp trigger amd learning good shooting technique willgo a long way. A kidd or volquartsen trigger kit is the beat place to start.
Dont waste money with fancy upgrades until you know what your rifle will be capable of.

Check this guy out. He has gone way diqn the rabbit hole. His videos are packed with info.

 

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I bought mine in 1995, prob been 500-600 rds shot through it. Scoped it about 4 years ago, loved that. Only other thing I will do is get a trigger job. It shoots pretty damn good as is. Lookin at current prices on em, & what they are made of, glad I got mine when I did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I put a Ruger BX trigger and a Hogue stock on mine. The trigger isn't a Timney trigger but it's much better than the OEM. The Hogue stock made it feel like a totally different gun.
Given those upgrades, would a Custom Ruger or used custom gun be worth it in the 650 to 800 range? I talked to two guys who said they put so much into their 10/22s they would have been better off buying custom like Kidd.
 

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Given those upgrades, would a Custom Ruger or used custom gun be worth it in the 650 to 800 range? I talked to two guys who said they put so much into their 10/22s they would have been better off buying custom like Kidd.
I had used my 10/22 for years before adding things to it. At the time, I think the stock cost me around $60 and the trigger $50 I did buy a Kidd spring/rod kit, bolt buffer pin, and charging handle. Out of those, the charging handle has the most impact on shooting/using the gun. I think that I paid around $225 for the gun so I'm not even close to $650.

I did add a muzzle break ($40?) but that was mainly because the gun was to short to rest on the stand offs in my safe. The other reason was that my son thought 22 was totally "uncool" I thought that the break made the humble 10/22 more bad ass........silly Dad......LOL.

You had asked what upgrade made the most difference out of the box and for me, the stock, trigger, and charging handle made the most difference. Thats a total of around $135. I got lucky and mine shoots very well so I've never been inclined to change out anything else but yet the gun is custom to me. They're also very easy to work on and I enjoy "putzing" every once in a while so doing the upgrades piecemeal is all part of the fun.

There's also the law of diminishing returns to take into account. I would dare to say that my 10/22 shoots as good as 90-95% of all 10/22's out there. In order to get that last 5-10% out of the gun it would cost me 3 times what the gun originally sold for. For that money, I bought a Ruger Precision......more toys for the boys.......;)

Trigger Wood Gun barrel Gun accessory Air gun


PS. If you like to target shoot at longer ranges go with a minimum of 12x and no less than a Vortex Crossfire in price range/quality. It's nice to see the holes at a 100yds.
 

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i have two and the first thing i did was the upgrade bolt releases. just makes it so much easier to shoot. an easy do it yourself or pay the ten bucks for the drop in part. on one of my rifles i splurged for the Kidd trigger group. all i can say is....it's worth it. but totally unnecessary for just shooting the rifle. the unscoped one has tru glo sights. a huge improvement over stock. softer bolt stops are nice too but just make it a little quieter. not a fan of the plastic stocks...so changed that too. it's a rifle you can play around with forever....us tinkerers like that. all that said it works just fine right out of the box. but once you have one.....enjoy!
 

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I own several 10/22's (and want more) and most are upgraded. Not that you absolutely have to upgrade one to have fun. When I got my first one as a teen in the late 80s I put hundreds of rounds through it with a bone stock rifle and had a ball doing so. Ruger does offer a custom target model with precision style stock, bull barrel and better trigger than the standard versions. As do other manufacturers like KIDD or Tactical Solutions, but they do cost a significant amount more than the basic rifle. For your first 10/22 I would suggest getting a plain Jane model, shooting it a bit and decided for yourself what you'd like to change on it. Like many others have suggested, first thing you may consider changing is the trigger. Ruger offers a factory trigger group, the BX, that's a simple drop in replacement of the original. It's super easy to swap out, all you have to do is remove the action from the stock, that's it. They have gone up in cost over the years. I remember paying around $50 five years back but now they're closer to $100. Like I said, you don't have to upgrade the trigger to shoot and have fun doing so. But once you've fired another that's been tweaked you will definitely want to change yours. Whatever you decide, just don't go overboard like so many of us here. I know people with well over $1k invested in what was a $250 rifle.
 

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Thinking of getting a 10/22 after having shot one a few times at the range. I mostly shoot indoors in 25 to 50 yd lanes although we have 100 yd lanes and am no better than lower average. Outdoor ranges are far away and inconvenient to get to.

But I've only been shooting a short time and almost all pistols, no rifles.

As many people seem to upgrade their 10/22s all the time, is there an out of the box Ruger that won't need any upgrades for a few years? Or are there a few high value upgrades that you would encourage nearly everyone to do?
I have 2 stock 10-22's. Both older models. I put optics on them, if that counts as an upgrade. Then I invested in ammunition.

The rest of it is basically jewelry. I learn to shoot what I buy.

I like a firm trigger because I hunt when it is cold. My hands may be numb and likely I will be wearing gloves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
These are all fair points. However, my tendency to buy things that are way above my pay grade functionally are because I've waited most of my life to go shooting, till I had the time and money to afford it. Unfortunately I'm over 60 and starting to get hand shakes and bad arthritis, as well as many other health issues. So part of it is just the desire to afford nice toys that are a pleasure to own and help me shoot better even though an above average shooter could probably do better with a Hi-Point than I could with a $5000 super gun customized to me. I probably don't have decades to get better and my shakes are only going to get worse. So I'm enjoying what I can when I can.

Doesn't mean I'm going to throw money away, but I'd like something that incorporates the most basic upgrades that I'm likely to want and has a nice stock.

For example, I now know that my Ruger MK IV SS is good enough for me. I don't need a VQ. But I've tricked it out with competition wooden grips because it helps me hold the gun steady, and it has a nice charging handle and a dot. Also, it's a beautiful machine that makes me proud to own it.
 

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I'd buy a bone stock 1022 carbine. It'll be a fine rifle as it is. After all, they've been a favorite for decades for a reason. Read the manual, shoot the rifle alot, get to know it. Then make the decisions about improvements YOU would like rather than what others think you would like. There's no rush. My humble $.02. Good Luck pareto and welcome to the forum.
 

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@pareto , I did not mean to imply one SHOULD NOT modify a 10-22. Only that one does not NEED TO modify a 10-22.

My Carbine does not shoot as well as my Target model does. The Target model came from Ruger with a higher quality trigger and a heavy contour barrel.

Some guys just like to tinker, and there is a lot of fun in that. I tinker with motorcycles.
 

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is there an out of the box Ruger that won't need any upgrades for a few years?
The Ruger 10/22 does not "need" upgrades. If you want a bullseye target rifle and you buy a 10/22 from Walmart, you have chosen the wrong tool IMO. I killed many squirrels and many tin cans in my youth with a stock 10/22... not sure how I ever got by with that rifle just stock out of the box!

I did change out the sights a few years ago. I removed the scope that I had put on it in my young adult years and put a set of Tech Sights on it. Gave me click repeatable adjustments and a sight picture similar to that of an AR-15. Now that my son is not shooting my 10/22, I may put the scope back on. I also did modify the bolt release to allow me to release the bolt without using the bolt release tab. But other than that, my rifle is the exact same as it was the day I got it for my birthday back in the early 80's.
 

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I would agree with other posters here. Shoot your 10/22 for awhile before spending money on upgrades. You may ( likely ) find that your ammo selection is a bigger factor in the accuracy and function of your rifle than minor upgrades that can add up to significant costs.

I would think that your first most important choices are wood vs. Synthetic stock, and blued vs stainless model. There are also different quality levels Ruger makes to choose from. Best wishes on whatever you choose to do.
 

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One of the biggest reasons for upgrading the stock is to get a recoil pad. Not because 22 recoil is brutal, but to get the danged gun to lean in a corner on a smooth, hard surface. Worth every penny to know that the gun won't kick out and land on the scope.
 
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