Ruger Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a Redhawk 45/45 and three Blackhawk 45 convertibles. Seven cylinders in all. All manufactured within the last two years.

I am just getting back into reloading after several years. I plan to shoot cast bullets almost exclusively.

Based on my reading here, it seems that the cylinder throats will likely need reamed to 0.4525. I have never performed this operation before.

So my question is...… is there a gunsmith that would ream all seven cylinders at once for a decent price? Or should I attempt to just rent the reamer and do them all myself? I have very little spare time lately due to work, and I don't know when I would have the time to sit down and learn to ream multiple cylinders all at once.

With seven cylinders to ream with little time, I would prefer to find a gunsmith that doesn't charge an arm and a leg.

Any help on this decision will be greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
These are questions we probably can't answer well. While reaming isn't a hard task in gunsmith terms, it may be beyond your specific capabilities. For gunsmiths, you'll have to contact them and ask for quotes. No idea what an arm and a leg cost in your neck of the woods, but you may find individual gunsmiths range from reasonable to outrageous. Consider turn around time as well.

But, have you tried reloading for one to see if you really need it reamed?

Jeff

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
 

·
Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
Joined
·
16,351 Posts
mc89, Reaming cylinder throats is a pretty easy task. It takes me less than 5 minutes per hole …. 30 minutes per cylinder at the most. The only tools you need is the reamer and a 1/2" drill chuck. If you don't have a chuck, you can buy a decent one at any hardware store or Harbor Freight for under 10 bucks. Here's a 1/2" Jacobs chuck at Harbor Freight: https://www.harborfreight.com/1-2-half-inch-jacobs-keyed-chuck-45731.html?_br_psugg_q=drill+chuck Drill chucks come in handy for all sorts of things … like a pin vice. No power tools are used, only the hand operated reamer mounted in a drill chuck.

You will also need some oil and some rags for cleanup.

I put a set of instructions in the forum E-Library. Here's a link: https://rugerforum.net/e-library/18570-forcing-cone-cylinder-throat-chamfering.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, Iowegan. After reading your PDF instructions, I believe I'll go ahead and do them myself. Probably have to wait until late next month to find the time though.

One question though about the cut-off cartridge case you use. Should it be cut to a specific length?
 

·
Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
Joined
·
16,351 Posts
mc89, Case guide length is not critical, however longer is better. The cutoff case I'm using is .75" long and was made from a spent unsized Starline case. Modern 45 Colt cases have walls that taper thicker at the base so it's hard to get much longer than .75" and still allow the reamer to fit. Make sure you start with an unsized spent case or the reamer won't fit. Expanded unsized cases fit very snug in most chambers so you may find they get stuck after the reamer is removed. No problem …. just use a 45 cal bore brush partially inserted from the rear. When you pull it out, the bristles will grab the case guide and pull it out.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top