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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all - first post, and I'd appreciate any of the collective wisdom here.

Got a Ruger BH Bisley .44 Spl., 5.5" today. Had sorta been on the lookout and finally snagged one.
The normal first day wipe-down, inspection, dry-fire, etc. shows the trigger pull weight OK and within reason, but the creep and travel are not what I expected.

Any suggestions? This is my first Ruger SA in a very long time. I used to own a .41 BH and a .22 SS years back that would have been early 70's production, but they went away on trades. (I'm a S&W-holic). Sure don't recall anywhere near that much travel in the triggers.

Thanks for any help.....
 

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Are you comfortable in taking it apart and 'cleaning up' the trigger area? If so plenty of videos on how to do it. My NM Blackhawk has almost no trigger movement B4 breaking.

If not, have another SA shooter try it and if unacceptable....back to Ruger to fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Are you comfortable in taking it apart and 'cleaning up' the trigger area? If so plenty of videos on how to do it. My NM Blackhawk has almost no trigger movement B4 breaking.

If not, have another SA shooter try it and if unacceptable....back to Ruger to fix it.
Oh sure, when I get time, I'll tear it down and take a look-see. I've been tinkering on guns for a few decades, was just surprised to find that much creep. Guess I ought to check out Y-tube and see what's there.
Thanks.
 

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Ruger's production varies, but shoot and dry fire for a while first to make sure it really is a problem. A trigger job is relatively was and inexpensive and taking up excess creep is part of the process.



Jeff
 

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I have a stock Bisley Hunter and a SBH Bisley, both triggers have significant creep. The SBH is a Lipseys that I bought used, the seller had a trigger job done on it. It does have slightly less creep but it's still easy to pull the trigger slightly and get movement without tripping the hammer.

Bottom line, the new model SBHs have creepy triggers and there's not much one can do about it. If you think your new model SBH doesn't have trigger creep, you don't know how the feel it.
 

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Please explain trigger creep, mine is brand new and has a great trigger? Mine is not a sbh but a bh bisley that may be why its so good. The op first post I think is the same as mine bh bisley.
 

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Trigger creep is when you start to pull the trigger and nothing happens for the first bit of travel. It's also relative, what one person finds creepy, another may see as normal.

Trigger grittiness is the "crunchy" feel as the trigger, sear, hammer, etc. work together. It can also be smoothed with a trigger job. A good trigger job should smooth the action and remove creep.

Jeff
 

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The Ruger single action design leaves considerable creep and overtravel in the trigger. Lightening the springs will make that even more apparent. With the proper jigs, you can clean up the engaging surfaces and reduce some of the sear interface - still leaving a safe sear - to eliminate creep. The overtravel is pretty standard to fix - throw a set screw in the trigger or in the trigger guard and you're in business.
 

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I do know that, for those that think all sbh have trigger creep I don't know where that comes from all I have shoot are fine.
Your's has creep, you don't know how to detect it. Cock the hammer with the cylinder empty, then slowly pull the trigger with your finger while watching the trigger move, it'll go ~1/16" before tripping the hammer. I can pump the trigger back and forth without tripping the hammer.
 

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Dry fire it 3-4000 times first and then see if the gun still has creep. I bet it will not.
I'll take that bet, I can promise you it's endemic. Even an expensive trigger job only makes it better but does not eliminate creep.

The real irony is that SP101, GP100 and Super Redhawk have a much better single action trigger.
 

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Even an expensive trigger job only makes it better but does not eliminate creep.
I agree, but you can come very close though. I have several with Bob Munden trigger jobs (by Jeff Ault) and it is mostly undetectable (and I am very sensitive to creep) at the 2# trigger pull weight that I like.
 

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I agree, but you can come very close though. I have several with Bob Munden trigger jobs (by Jeff Ault) and it is mostly undetectable (and I am very sensitive to creep) at the 2# trigger pull weight that I like.
Interesting. The guy I bought my Lipseys 3.75" says he had a trigger job done but it's not much better than my stock Bisley Hunter (I have no idea who the gunsmith was).

Thankfully, I learned to shoot a handgun on a P89DC and a GP100, creep doesn't bother me on a handgun. Precision rifle is another story, I guess I'm not expect really tight groups with a 44mag compared to a 700 in 223 with a Timney trigger set at 1.5lbs.
 

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Dry fire it 3-4000 times first and then see if the gun still has creep. I bet it will not.
I'll also take that bet.

Creep is inherent to the sear interface design, too much sear engagement surface might yield a very safe trigger, but it also means the trigger has to travel a long ways before it breaks over. Dry firing "3-4000 times" would only self-polish the engaging surfaces, but would not at all remove the creep. Self-polishing can help remove "gritty feel" from a trigger, but it won't remove creep.

Similarly, P89DC isn't really correct in this statement:

Even an expensive trigger job only makes it better but does not eliminate creep.
If the "expensive trigger job" properly reduces the sear engagement, then yes, it can eliminate, or at least minimize, the creep present in a trigger.
 

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If the "expensive trigger job" properly reduces the sear engagement, then yes, it can eliminate, or at least minimize, the creep present in a trigger.
LOL, "or at least minimize it"...Please show us how or give us the name of the gunsmith that eliminates all noticable creep in a NM Ruger. And what happens on that creepless trigger with 2lb pull when it's dropped cocked?
 

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LOL, "or at least minimize it"...Please show us how or give us the name of the gunsmith that eliminates all noticable creep in a NM Ruger. And what happens on that creepless trigger with 2lb pull when it's dropped cocked?
I'm no professional smith, but have worked for/with a few over the years. All of my Ruger SA's have been cut down to 15thou sear engagement - for reference, most start out between 25-35thou from factory. I don't make a habit of dropping my revolvers while cocked, but I did a bit of "testing" on the first one I did over 15yrs ago and I couldn't get the hammer to shear with 15thou from any reasonable drop height. Safe sear engagement isn't just about surface area, the angle plays a part as well. With the compounding levers in the action, it makes a marked difference in creep to take the ruger sears down to minimum. By design, it's not really possible to take out all perceptible creep from the Ruger trigger and produce a "no movement trigger," but it does get a lot better. Nobody really expects a $500 production revolver to have a match quality trigger, but they do get a LOT better than factory.

My Bowen 475Line SBH has 18thou - I'll guarantee that they took it down, because I know it was "creepy" when I sent it to them.

Just because you've never seen it done before, well, I end up using this quote a lot on this site:

"There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy..." - Wild Bill Shakespeare, Hamlet
 
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