Ruger Forum banner
21 - 40 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
If you do not reload I would either start or get a 45 acp cylinder for the gun so it is cheaper to fire.
This +1.

I recently bought a .45acp/.45Colt NMBH and am very happy with it. Unlike .44 Magnums I used to own, .45Colt isn't painful to shoot, it's only painful to buy! :)

Also, because I have the .45acp cylinder, I'll always have ammo on hand for it as I also have a 1911 and a Glock30 which I also both enjoy.

Still, I have been saving my brass (particularly .45 and .357/.38) for the day (hopefully coming soon) when I do start reloading. I really do enjoy my Blackhawk - the serial number indicates a birthday in 1977. It's action is much smoother than my New Vaquero and another Blackhawk I used to have. Good luck and welcome to the forum!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts


My newest. 45 Colt and tough to find in this configuration. It is used but nearly pristine. She wants to be a dirty girl :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
I just traded for a 1976 Blackhawk in .45 Colt. Have a Super Blackhawk and a Vaquero in .357 Magnum. I reload so just another set of dies and new recipes to try out. I'd definately encourage the OP to start reloading. Fun and makes shooting much more affordable.
 

·
To the Right of Reagan
Joined
·
570 Posts
The .45 Colt (technically there is no such thing as a .45 long Colt) is a fantastic round. Loaded as a cowboy round it is great for target shooting and plinking. The more powerful rounds are great for hunting. If you are a reloader, the .45 Colt is very versatile. There is also a great variety of factory ammo, but it is rather pricey. I have 4 Ruger Blackhawks in .45 Colt and love them all. I could almost say the exact same things about the .357 magnum. One good thing about the .357 magnum is that you can usually find less expensive.38 special for target and plinking. Hope this helps.
I've read it here a few times in the last week where some guys say there is no such thing as a Long Colt. I don't understand. My Instruction Manual that came with my Ruger Vaquero has printed right on it .45LC. Also, at my local hardware store, I told the lady I needed .45 cal. rounds, she came back with a bullet that was too short. I had to go 25 miles to another town to find a .45 cal. bullet that is long enough for my cylinder. All my ammo boxes even have .45LC printed on them.

What do some of you guys mean when you say there is no such thing as a Long Colt?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
495 Posts
.45 colt is a "manstopper" as defined by the late great Elmer Kieth and a cartridge that he (forced to choose) wrote that he would select over the .357 Mag. With the flexibility to load up for hunting, I would think it a great choice. Just don't count on finding inexpensive factory loads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,814 Posts
What do some of you guys mean when you say there is no such thing as a Long Colt?
Read up on the history of the .45 Colt cartridge. In a nut shell (as this subject has been discussed repeatedly if you do a search) You will find back in the latter 1800s there was a lot of 'confusion' due to shorter .45 rounds (Schofield, government, and probably some others that I don't remember) and the longer .45 Colt. Now we can't have confusion in the Army right? So to stop the confusion it was commonly called 'give me a box of the Long .45 Colt'. So the .45 Long Colt became a commonly used 'alias' for the .45 Colt cartridge by civilians and Army personal alike. That was then.... Now-a-days there is no confusion (or shouldn't be I should say) as there is just the .45 Colt, .45 APC, .45 Auto Rim, .45 Schofield, and a .45 'cowboy' load used for CAS that are in play. Even at that the .45AR, Schofield, and the Cowboy are small 'niche' cartridges. But, alas we still have people (and quite a few companies for marketing purposes or they just gave in :) ) still referring to the .45 Colt as the .45 Long Colt even though there isn't really no such cartridge except in the minds of some shooters and of course on the o' silver screen. Go figure :) . I used to call it the Long Colt too BTW... until I did a bit of research on the round when I started to reload for it and found out differently. Is it bad to add the 'Long'? Is it confusing? No, of course not! We all know what you mean if you add the 'L', just not technically correct and totally unnecessary in today's world. There you have it in a nutshell.

Just a couple references via google to get you started....

The .45 Colt: A History | Sheriff Jim Wilson
.45 Colt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
.45 Colt (.45 long Colt)

... and so on
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,568 Posts
I have an opportunity to buy a used Blackhawk in 45 LC for about 435 dollars
appears to be made late seventies, early eighties
I really would like to buy this gun, but I have two questions for more experienced SA folks:

What is the 45 LC round like? Compared say to .357?
Is it too expensive nowadays?

I know I am a newbie and I appreciate your help
Here's my opinion on the 45 colt. With a ruger blackhawk, and an either hand loaded, or premium loads like buffalo bore or HSM bear loads, it extremely potent... Somewhere between 44 mag and 454 casull. With standard SAAMI loads, it is a good man killer, as well as medium/large game. I will tell you that 45 Colt is an expensive round if you are stuck with factory loads. As a hand loader myself, it is by far my favorite revolver round.

For premium loads, in my area, it's between $1 and $2 per round. For non-bear loads, it's about $1 per round. As a hand loader, it's about $.20 per round.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,568 Posts
Funny story

Years ago, a non-experienced in guns guy was coming with me fishing. He had an Italian repro SAA .45 colt. He went for supplies at Walmart, and verified what caliber he needed to buy ammo for. I told him "45 Colt". He comes back an hour or so later with no ammo.

I said "what's wrong?". He said "they don't have any 45 Colt, only 45 long colt- thats what the clerk said"


Arghh. I went back to the store with him and got what he needed.
 

·
To the Right of Reagan
Joined
·
570 Posts
Read up on the history of the .45 Colt cartridge. In a nut shell (as this subject has been discussed repeatedly if you do a search) You will find back in the latter 1800s there was a lot of 'confusion' due to shorter .45 rounds (Schofield, government, and probably some others that I don't remember) and the longer .45 Colt. Now we can't have confusion in the Army right? So to stop the confusion it was commonly called 'give me a box of the Long .45 Colt'. So the .45 Long Colt became a commonly used 'alias' for the .45 Colt cartridge by civilians and Army personal alike. That was then.... Now-a-days there is no confusion (or shouldn't be I should say) as there is just the .45 Colt, .45 APC, .45 Auto Rim, .45 Schofield, and a .45 'cowboy' load used for CAS that are in play. Even at that the .45AR, Schofield, and the Cowboy are small 'niche' cartridges. But, alas we still have people (and quite a few companies for marketing purposes or they just gave in :) ) still referring to the .45 Colt as the .45 Long Colt even though there isn't really no such cartridge except in the minds of some shooters and of course on the o' silver screen. Go figure :) . I used to call it the Long Colt too BTW... until I did a bit of research on the round when I started to reload for it and found out differently. Is it bad to add the 'Long'? Is it confusing? No, of course not! We all know what you mean if you add the 'L', just not technically correct and totally unnecessary in today's world. There you have it in a nutshell.

Just a couple references via google to get you started....

The .45 Colt: A History | Sheriff Jim Wilson
.45 Colt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
.45 Colt (.45 long Colt)

... and so on
Okay, thanks. I need to go to the local hardware store and see what their .45 ammo says on the box. They look just like mine, except they're shorter. Do they maybe say ".45 Auto?" I'll go see.
 

·
Registered
Northwest Oregon
Joined
·
2,436 Posts
I have a Ruger Blackhawk with both the .45 Colt and .45 ACP cylinders. That makes it very versatile to shoot from mild to wild. The .45 Colt can be a lot of fun with cowboy loads on up to hot .44 magnum levels. The .45 ACP +P rounds have about the same energy of typical .45 Colt rounds. I also have a Smith & Wesson 460XVR that will shoot 460 S&W magnum, 454 Casull, or .45 Colt rounds. It will handle up to a 460 S&W magnum round with a 300 grain bullet at 2060 fps and 2826 ft. lbs. of muzzle energy.
 

·
To the Right of Reagan
Joined
·
570 Posts
Okay, I just got back from our hardware store. They have two different manufacturers of .45, and they both say ".45 Auto" on the box. The case is about 3/8" shorter than what I use.

They can get mine in, and they're glad to do it, but they won't stock mine.

What do I call my type of ammo, just ".45 Colt?"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,568 Posts
Okay, I just got back from our hardware store. They have two different manufacturers of .45, and they both say ".45 Auto" on the box. The case is about 3/8" shorter than what I use.

They can get mine in, and they're glad to do it, but they won't stock mine.

What do I call my type of ammo, just ".45 Colt?"
Yup, 45 colt is the technical name that most manufacturers call it. 45 auto is technically 45 ACP, it is a rimless cartridge made for semi-auto pistols. Glad the ammo manufacturers make it clear as mud huh? ;)
 

·
To the Right of Reagan
Joined
·
570 Posts
Yup, 45 colt is the technical name that most manufacturers call it. 45 auto is technically 45 ACP, it is a rimless cartridge made for semi-auto pistols. Glad the ammo manufacturers make it clear as mud huh? ;)
Yeah, it's confusing, but you set me straight and I appreciate it. From now on, I'm just going to ask for .45 Colt. If they bring me the wrong ammo, then they're not knowledgeable in their job. I'll have to educate them. ;)

Thanks for taking the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
The 45 Colt has been my favorite round for years. Right now I have a 5 & 1/2" Blackhawk Convertible, a 4 & 3/4" Uberti SAA, and a 7 & 1/2" Pietta SAA.
In fact, although I have other modern choices, the Blackhawk is my nightstand gun. She stays loaded with Corbon 45 Colt +P 200 grain JHP's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Lot's of stores these days no longer carry 45 Colt, or 45 LC, whatever you want to call it. If you just ask for 45 ammo, you will probably get 45 ACP if you are not careful. The nice thing about a 45 convertible is that you can use them both. And the ACP is cheaper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
What do some of you guys mean when you say there is no such thing as a Long Colt?
There are those that get their panties in a bunch if the words "Long Colt" are uttered.

Pay no attention to the screeching from the peanut gallery. Yes, the cartridge is officially called a 45 Colt, but the term 45 Long Colt is OK too.

I've got a few of the "original 45 Colts" They use .454 round balls and loose powder. Of course there is also the Ruger Old Army that I load with .457 round balls. Technically, those are 44 Colts - even though they use a larger diameter bullet than the 45 Colt.

Go figure.

There is nothing wrong with calling the 45 Colt a Long Colt. These days if you go to a gun store and ask for a box of 45 colts nine times out of ten you will be handed a box of 45 ACPs.

BTW - I shoot both in my Blackhawk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
If you cast your own bullets as well as reload ,you can further knock the cost down. Casting is not that difficult ,just a lot of little things to learn but be careful as it can be a disease .Buying different molds to try and scrounging for lead. The results are very gratifying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
The 45 Colt has been my favorite round for years. Right now I have a 5 & 1/2" Blackhawk Convertible, a 4 & 3/4" Uberti SAA, and a 7 & 1/2" Pietta SAA.
In fact, although I have other modern choices, the Blackhawk is my nightstand gun. She stays loaded with Corbon 45 Colt +P 200 grain JHP's.
Like you, I find the Blackhawk in .45 Colt very comforting on my night stand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
The .45 colt cartridge is very versitile. It can be loaded mild for plinking and cowboy action shooting, and hot for hunting. There are several brands of ammo for it on the market but like many others have stated they can be pretty pricey. If you do decide to get it i would look into reloading. I started out reloading the .45 colt because it is one of the easiest. I have the lee master loader and I can easily make 1,000 rounds in a night. The cost of reloading can vary but for a basic plinker load I average about 20 cents per round compared to $1 at the stores. Buying in bulk is the key to saving when reloading.
 
21 - 40 of 43 Posts
Top