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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 7 1/2 Ruger Blackhawk 45LC/45ACP Convertible. I would like to know if I could shoot the Rimmed 45 ACP ammo in it out of the 45LC cylinder. I don`t think I ever would, but just wanted to know if I could. Thanks in advance for any info.
ken
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys for the info. I never even thought about a difference in rim thickness between the 45 ACP RIM and the old 45LC. I wonder why there is a difference in rim thickness. What guns made to day will shoot the 45 ACP RIM cartridge. And what guns did they shoot the 45 ACP RIM`s thru any way and were they accurate and really functional. I remember seeing a guy at a Gun Show a few years ago buying about 500 pieces of 45 ACP RIM brass. And I just thought to my self that he was going to shoot it out of a Ruger 45LC. But now I wonder, just what in the world he was going to shoot it out of. I really enjoy this forum and I have learned a lot from all of You.
ken
 

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In a nutshell, there was a shortage of 1911 autos during WW1. The original New Service was in 45 "long" Colt (the 1909 model). It was a simple expedient to machine the rear of the cylinder so that 45 acp could be used by utilizing a half moon clip. This allowed 3 cartridges to be loaded simultaneously. Smith and Wesson followed with their large frame Hand Ejector Model. Both were labeled "1917" models and Colt carried the "New Service" name over to the newer model. There is reproduction web gear available at Pacific Canvas and Awning, as well as other places. Original gear is a bit pricey. I have heard the shortage continued throughout the war and there were more 45 acp revolvers used than 1911s.

I have both and prefer the S & W, although the Colt is a GIANT pistol. Many were subsequently modified into big-bore "belly" guns after the war, mostly by John Henry Fitzgerald ("Fitz"). I think either one is nearly as perfect as you can get in a revolver for defense.

The thicker rim was to compensate for the thickness of the clip and to facilitate ejection by the extractor. One of the pistols (S & W, I think) has a shoulder, so 45 acp can be fired without clips but you need a rod (like a pencil) to eject the empties.

The S & W 25 in 45 acp also can use 45 Auto Rim (at least some can). Incidentally, that is the most accurate revolver I have ever owned, including my Python.

I prefer to load 45 AR for mine, simply so as to avoid messing with a clip==all it takes is a 45 AR shellholder and 45 acp dies.
 

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cpt t:
Thanks guys for the info. I never even thought about a difference in rim thickness between the 45 ACP RIM and the old 45LC. I wonder why there is a difference in rim thickness.
In order for the .45 ACP cartridge to work in the old Colt and S&W revolvers, the half moon clips were devised. These clips required the cylinder to be shortened on the hind end, which allowed part of the head of the .45 ACP case to be exposed. The .45 Auto Rim had to have a thicker rim to make up the difference of the clip, and place the case head in the same relative position as the ACP case with clips.

Since the Single Action does not need clips, the case headspacing on the case mouth, Ruger made the cylinder chambers deep enough for the case to chamber so the head is nearly flush with the back of the cylindder. This left headspace too tight for use of the thinck rim .45 AR case.

Colt and S&W revolvers chambered for .45 ACP will handle .45 AR equally well, not so with Single Action revolvers, unless specifically designed/modified to do so.

Bob Wright

(BearBio beat me to the posting.)
 

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BearBio:

I don't believe Fitzgerald modified so many of those M1917 Colts, as most of the ones I have seen don't bear the other trademarks of his work. Colt actually did these modifications, as Fitzgerald was an employee of Colt. His trademarks were the cut away trigger guard and de-horned hammer, as well as the shortened barrel.

During the 'Fifties, many of these were advertised as mail order, for $19.95 to $24.95, and were done by various mail order companies, some even being fitted with the Williams Shorty Ramp.


Bob Wright
 

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I did mis-speak. I did not mean to imply that Fitz did them himself. Many were converted following his lead and are often referred to "Fitz Specials", even if made today.
 
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