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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a used Blackhawk in caliber .30 Carbine. The serial number is from year 1981 of manufacture. The revolver is in very good condition but I noticed that sometimes after firing the ejector rod does not line up with the chambers, preventing the ejection of empty cartridge casings using the ejector rod. When that happens, I have to remove the cylinder from the gun and use a cleaning rod to push the empty cases out of each chamber, then re-insert the cylinder into the frame. This seems to happen only upon firing the first six rounds from a clean gun (I always remove the cylinder when I clean the gun). Afterwards when I re-insert the cylinder into the gun, the ejector rod lines up OK and I don't have any more problems ejecting empty cases. The cylinder seems to be properly timed as I inspected the empty cylinder chambers down the bore with a light as I cocked the gun for each chamber. Each chamber seemed to line up OK. The cylinder otherwise seems to lock up tight enough (very little end-to-end play and no sideways play). Any comments? Thank you.
 

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I had a .41 mag blackhawk 2001 year modle that did what you are talking about, never did figure out what caused this but sold the gun to finance another project. P.S. I did not sell the gun for that reason thow, i t was a fine shooting revolver.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
more on the .30 carbine Blackhawk ejector rod issue

The .30 carbine chambers are relatively small diameter in relation to the size of the cylinder anyway. I noticed that the ejector rod is not perfectly round at the end but is shaped to help (I assume) guide the rod into the chamber. I can't ascertain if it's a cylinder alignment issue or not because as I mentioned previously the chambers seem to line up square with the bore as the hammer is cocked for each chamber. I'll check that again to make sure.
It's a good shooter though. Lots of power in a small cartridge. Don't intend to use it for hunting or target shooting just a 'carry piece' for walks into the backwoods and around the farm to deal with coyotes if they happen to get too close to our horses. We've got lots of coyotes up our way. I also have a Ruger 'Bisley' Single-Six .22 (1986 vintage-a beautiful revolver), a Single-Six .22 regular frame vintage 1985 that was given to me, and a Ruger 10-22 carbine. Love all my Ruger firearms. Best value for the dollar in the firearms market today in my opinion.
 
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