Ruger Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I'm brand new to revolvers so bear with me. I just purchased a new model blackhawk 45 /45. The rear sight has some play in it. Is it supposed to do this. Also when swapping cylinders the rod sometimes gets hung up. Thanks for any help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,356 Posts
Almost all of my Ruger revolvers with adjustable sights have "play" in them side to side, or do you mean up and down, which, yes, it will move down when you push on it because of the springs.

The only solution is to get a Bowen Rough Country sight if you absolutely need a rock solid sight that won't move.

Once the gun breaks in and you get used to it, changing cylinders will be easier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
My 357/9mm Blackhawk Flattop rear sight has zero play in it and I got it turned up a lot from zeroing it in. If I push down on the back of the sight you'll get some play side to side.

The cylinder needs to be lined up pretty much before you can work the base pin in but once that's done it should slide in easily. A drop or two of oil on the base pin is a good idea.

BTW, welcome to the forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
397 Posts
Changing cylinders will become much easier the more you do it.

You'll learn how to place the cylinder in exactly the right spot and turn it just exactly right to get the base pin to slide right in.

Very soon you won't even think about it as you do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
Changing cylinders, there is a trick, roll the cylinder back and forth just a bit as you slide the pin back in it will go in much easier.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,907 Posts
1st verify the pin goes into the frame freely w/o the cyl, and then just in the cyl. If not, check for burrs, polish the pin, etc., until it will slip in both easily. Then put the cyl in the gun and try the pin. Always lubricate the pin, it gets a lot of powder fouling at the joint of the cyl gas ring and the front inside of the cyl window.


Rest chief's method will allow you to feel the engagement of the cyl pawl into the star notches on the rear of the cyl. Until that happens, the hole in the cyl will not align with the holes in the frame for the pin to go in straight. Jiggle the pin as you insert it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,381 Posts
Its not something that is generally mastered right away. My Dad still has trouble changing his 22/22mag after a year. Twice now he said there was a problem and I changed it out in seconds. There is a trick to it.
Do what Hondo and Rest chief said. ;) Good luck.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
575 Posts
I use gravity for re-installing the base pin. Not sure if all Ruger SA guns will do this but, I can push the release button and my pin will slide down with the gun pointed down. It will slide back home with the gun pointed up. (cylinder removed, of course)

To replace the cylinder I simply put it in place, (gate open, of course) Point the gun upwards, push the button and wiggle the cylinder around until the pin finds it's hole and drops. I may need to help push it home but note that there is no forcing on the pin until it is fully engaged in the cylinder. Before I started using this method I always felt that I needed three hands.

Hope this makes sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
olhubb,

I KNOW I'm the newest guy on the forum, I just bought my used Blackhawk last night. Haven't shot it yet. But I did have problems getting the pin through.

I figured out all the things said here, good info. But, in addition to lubing the pin, I used a .22 brush to clean the center hole through the cylinder. Lot of carbon there. Then I used a Q-Tip to brush a little light oil through. That made a world of difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
450 Posts
My problem is with the adjustable rear sights on my Blackhawk. It shoots very low. So I started turning the rear-sight UP very slowly. A quarter turn at a time. When it was up to a point that was there, but almost there, a few shots disengaged the elevation screw from the base of the sight and, of course, the spring elevates it to a ridiculous point. It (the screw) is just no longer attached to or screwed into the base. I absolutely do not want to re-engage the screw and then start filing the front sight down. I need a solution. Is it possible to find a screw that is, maybe, one or two millimeters longer than the factory one so that I can elevate the rear-sights and have them still engaged (and the screw will not work itself out. It's hard to blue-loctite it when it's at optimum or near optimum elevation. Are there after market rear-sights for the Blackhawk?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,751 Posts
It shoots very low....
That's good (in a way). My .357 flattop shot very low too. So out came the file and filed down that front sight. Now my rear sight is back where it should be. The .357 is the middle revolver below. You can see the front sight looks different than the others.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
450 Posts
Yes. I guess that's what I'll be doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
450 Posts
Absolutely.......

I used to dabble in woodworking. Measure twice (or more) and cut once.
I have a boresight laser that goes in from the breech. I therefore, have a pretty good point of aim and I'll work the sights to get onto that laser point. The only problem I have with that laser is that it uses two of those tiny batteries like they use in watches. But the moment I put those two batteries IN and before I screw the base cap the laser comes ON. Then I waste battery time screwing the base in and placing the sight in the breech. That's for .357 mag and .38 spcl. For .22 they came up with a box to house the batteries connected to the laser by a wire and the box has an Off/On switch. Very convenient.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,751 Posts
Be careful there, as the muzzle is moving before the bullet exits, the bore sight method isn't going to work to well. Need to find the load you are going to shoot, then file, shoot, file shoot, until you are satisfied :) .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
450 Posts
File a bit.....shoot ..... repeat

Boresight laser is to get me in the neighbourhood.
Problem is I rarely have the range to myself. During handgun sessions we shoot ten minute relays. 10 shooters on the line (usually 13 but end lanes are waiting for aeration and air flow fixes.)
What I like to do to zero in, is shoot from 10 yards (we're not allowed to shoot from less than seven because of steel backdrop and ricochets) then walk back two or three yards, shoot --- adjust if necessary--- back another few yards and repeat until I'm back at our maximum 20 yards line.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top