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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys have read here about using some kind of wax etc for the care of the blued finish on revolvers. Now my question does this also apply to a Ruger GP100 Wiley Clapp with the flat or satin blued finish? I just want to take the best care for the protection of this gun. Comments, feedback, ideas much appreciated! Thanks in advance!!!:D;):cool:
 

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Waxing isn't a great solution, but it does work. It works in 2 ways:

1) It's a hydrophobic carbon source on the surface which protects against oxidation attack from moisture by repelling condensation.

2) It's a semi-sealant, basically similar to coating your revolver in grease, but without the mess.

I've started coating blued/phosphate/nitron/etc guns with Froglube, it seems to resist very well. Get out a hair dryer or mid-temp heat gun, get your GP100 HOT to the touch, and rub on the frog lube. It'll protect the finish and give it a rich, deep glow.

Bluing finish - meaning gloss, satin, matte, etc, are factors of their pre-bluing condition. If the surface isn't polished before bluing, it'll be satin or matte afterwards. If it's not high gloss polished before bluing, it can never be so without potentially cutting through the bluing. Satin/Matte finishes are more SLIGHTLY more vulnerable to rusting than high gloss polish finishes, but the same methods that protect a gloss finish will also protect a matte/satin finish.
 

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I have used Renaissance Wax with great success.
It works on blued gloss, semi gloss, satin Ect.
Does great on Stainless and wood finishes.
It is made for protecting almost everything.
Many museums around the globe use Renaissance wax to preserve many items.
It is pricey to buy, but a little goes a very long way.
It also has to be worked vigorously to polish off.
My best success has been with microfiber towels.
Costco has the best deal on the microfiber towels.
There at least as many opinions as well as products to maintain your firearms.
Most of these will protect finishes,
Renaissance wax leaves no mess behind.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Varminterrror can you get Frog Lube at the LGS's then FST JACK where to find the Rennaissance Wax at? My holster has a very good fit, don't plan on storing the gun in the holster. Only going to use it when out shooting. But thought of holster wear can work on a guns finish, now what if I put a plastic bag over the revolver then get the holster wet and put the gun in the holster just to stretch and loosen it up a bit? If so do I use hot or cold water on the holster? Or soak the holster in something else?
 

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Frog Lube is available at gunshops, whether your local shop stocks it or not is up to them. About half of them near me do. A little lasts a long time as long as you don't leave it open.

What is the lining of your new holster? I've mentioned it before, but I'll stress again - common lining leathers are chrome tanned (think garment leather, kid/goat skin, bull hide, purse leather, suede, etc), and will retain residual incipient chromium salts which will attack your gun finish and oxidize your firearm. Wet molding, or moisture from temperature change or perspiration will make this worse, as it can drive the hydrophilic salts to the surface.

Chrome tanned linings should have been thoroughly soaked and rinsed, then reoiled by the maker before the holster was assembled, but most these days do not. The purchaser should do so by running hot water through the holster long enough to stop any and all "bubbling" that might happen as the salts react and come to the surface. Chrome tanned leather straight from the roll will look like alka-seltzer when dipped in hot water. Once the salts are flushed from the leather, it needs to be reoiled with a firearm friendly leather oil.

Veg tanned leathers (think holster shells, saddles, etc) will not contain the corrosive salts of chrome tanned leathers, but veg tanned leathers WILL hold moisture and WILL leach oils out of your firearm. To my experience, frog lube seems to be friendly to firearms as well as holster leather (but WILL change its color, so don't coat visible parts of the holster), and most boot creams, lotions, or waxes are firearm finish friendly. CLP type gun cleaning oils will cut leather oils and degrade leather. So you still need to reoil (or cream or wax) the leather to ensure it won't leach oil from your firearm and suck away your finish richness, leaving your gun vulnerable to oxidation.

A lot of guys use Ren wax on holsters, and I have myself in the past, but I'm leery of it after learning a bit more about it following some odd results on a few saddles. It's GREAT stuff for museums - no doubt - but it's a micro-crystalline wax, and when microcrystals flocculate within leather pores, they become abrasive and as the leather moves with natural use, these crystals damage the collagen fibrils that give leather its stiffness and strength. This feature makes it a fantastic polish, so durable and so lustrous for so many materials, but for leather, it's damaging. Many leather oils soften leather by absorbing and softening these fibrils, but they don't actually damage the "strands" - meaning they'll flex and stretch, which isn't always good, but they are still strong. Salts and other crystalline particles in the pores will abrade and eventually cut the fibrils, making the leather weaker. For a holster, that might not matter as much as it does for saddle riggings, but as a leatherworker, I just don't see the point in using it when other products are available.

Never use any "compound" on gunleathers (or really any leather), as they are typically "compounded" with water. Fewer of them are cut with mineral spirits, but both water and spirits will be bad for the leather and bad for your firearm over time.

Many holsters are simply one layer of thick leather, with the flesh side exposed to the firearm. The flesh side on these are burnished (rubbed while wet to smooth) to give a slick appearance and feel. Some are waxed, and some are coated with a burnishing compound - essentially a plastic/polymer coating to hold the pores of the flesh side together. If you wet mold too wet, you can ruin the burnishing inside your holster, making it a rough surface when it dries, and particularly rougher when a bit of dust finds its way into the holster and find its itself at home between the nap. These holsters are cheap, so they're very common, but they're by far the worst culprits for holster wear on blued firearms, because they have the most abrasive interior.

To Prep your firearm for wet molding:

1) oil it well
2) tape a piece of dowel fit between the sights to prevent making a "locking impression" on the interior of the holster
3) wrap the firearm in a well fit plastic bag (I like to vacuum seal mine when I make new holsters using real firearms instead of dummies)

To wet mold your holster, you don't actually need to soak the holster through unless you're trying to do an exterior impression of the firearm. For slick shell holsters, you don't need to wet the exterior at all.

1) Run hot water through the interior of the holster until the interior surface feels like wet clay (takes far less water than you'd think)
2) While the holster is still nearly too hot to touch, insert the firearm, and press any high areas from the exterior of the holster to mold the interior surface to fit the gun.
3) Return to rework certain areas as it dries
4) Leave it overnight to dry
5) By morning, the interior should still JUST be damp. Don't yet remove the firearm, but pull it out 1/8"and gently mold again, then pull out another 1/8" and do so again. This loosens the physical lock the molding may have created behind some of the protruding features, but doesn't make the holster loose fitting, as the damp molding done at this time is not as well featured as the wet molding of the night prior.
6) Let it fully dry, then remove the firearm.
7) If it grips too tightly in one area or another, rewet and remold in those areas, but add a few layers of masking tape on the firearm in those areas before inserting into the bag.
8) Replenish the oils by creaming or waxing the interior of the holster and blowing through with a hair dryer or medium temp heat gun (not high temp - the funneled holster will gather heat and can burn)

Kiwi shoe polish, carnuba wax, bees wax, and Doc Marten's doc-balm are my go-to lining polishes/waxes for holsters. They all need a little heat to absorb properly and deeply into the leather.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The Holster is a Bianchi its not a suede lining I am guessing its a a layer of think leather with the flesh side exposed the the firearm. My thoughts are to try to do the molding I am just trying to get the fit looser the retention is fairly firm. My other question after a mold job as you have described would it help to finish with as described Kiwi shoe polish or carnuba wax, bee's wax or the Doc Martens doc-balm???
 

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With a flesh side, it'll likely be coated and burnished inside, so you'll have to get them hot and wet to take wet molding at all. If it's not sealed, it'll take water readily. Less work and water to wet mold it.

Yes, seal with the cream or wax after wet molding, and blow with warm air to sink it into the leather.

It has been many years, but I have used Galco holster lube for this purpose as well. It does the job, meaning it makes removing and reholstering easier, but I can't attest to how good it actually is for the leather, or the firearm.
 
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